Date   
Re: Wiring problem

Tom O'Hara
 

I'll toss in an opinion which echoes those of others. The diagram looks OK for the reversers I use, which are by DCC Specialities. I don't know the MRC unit. So I'll pose a couple of ideas: If the MRC unit uses a mechanical relay, then it's probably too slow; and the system will short out first. If the MRC unit has an input and output which are connected backwards, then this could create havoc with your wiring depending on the rest of the layout. I prefer the former explanation at this point. 

.....Tom

--
... Tom

Re: Wiring problem

Jay
 
Edited

I used 2 MRC Reverser Units on the MWR Train Museum N Scale layout.
This is on a Digitrax system layout.
Both ends  of both sections were totally isolated.
That is, 2 isolating rail joiners at each end of each section.
They worked flawlessly. No hitch or short when entering or leaving the section.
They were connected directly to the DCC Buss.
It is interesting that you can't get it to work.
That was my 1st time using a reverser.
They are still working 5 years later.

Jay

Re: Wiring problem

Jay
 

Sorry for the multiple posts, my computer crashed twice while writing that post!

Jay

Fw: binding wires in DCC installation

Michael Shockley
 




I was watching a video and they mentioned binding the wires in a loco to keep them out of the drive.  It was something about a waxy threadlike material that sticks together when you press it to hold the wires.
Any idea what they were talking about?  I wish I were paying more attention before it got away from me.

Mike Shockley

Re: Fw: binding wires in DCC installation

Craig Zeni
 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 9:00 PM, Michael Shockley via Groups.Io wrote:




I was watching a video and they mentioned binding the wires in a loco to keep them out of the drive. It was something about a waxy threadlike material that sticks together when you press it to hold the wires.
Any idea what they were talking about? I wish I were paying more attention before it got away from me.
Not familiar with anything that sticks together, but dental floss works fantastic for bundling up wires. We all have that package of floss that our dentist gave us...that we never use :)

Craig Zeni
Cary NC

Re: Fw: binding wires in DCC installation

Kurt Konrath
 

I have used “Bees Wax” from craft stores in sewing department.

Slightly sticky helps string stay together.

Kurt

On Mar 11, 2019, at 7:52 AM, Craig Zeni <@CraigZ> wrote:


On Mar 10, 2019, at 9:00 PM, Michael Shockley via Groups.Io wrote:




I was watching a video and they mentioned binding the wires in a loco to keep them out of the drive. It was something about a waxy threadlike material that sticks together when you press it to hold the wires.
Any idea what they were talking about? I wish I were paying more attention before it got away from me.
Not familiar with anything that sticks together, but dental floss works fantastic for bundling up wires. We all have that package of floss that our dentist gave us...that we never use :)

Craig Zeni
Cary NC





Re: Wiring problem

Don Vollrath
 

Charles, disconnect the two output wires from the MRC unit. Then with power ON verify with a voltmeter that there is near zero volts across all 4 loop isolating gaps. If it is not zero you have an unwanted connection to loop tracks. Find and disconnect it.
DonV

Re: Fw: binding wires in DCC installation

Mark Stamm
 

This is typically referred to as cable lacing. 

http://www.aeroelectric.com/articles/cable_lace/cable_lace.html

Mark P Stamm
Mark at Euphoriatt dot Com

Sent from my mobile device

Re: Fw: binding wires in DCC installation

Joseph Melhorn
 

It’s called Stator Lacing and Tie Cord. In another life, we used it to bind rewound coils of wire for motor stators and armatures. It is a braided flat cord (cotton?) that was coated with wax, or something resembling wax. That was 45 years ago and I still have a partial spool of it. You could also wax your own thread with beeswax and get similar results.

Joe Melhorn

Sahuarita, AZ

 

Re: Forgive my ignorance! Am I creating several reverse loops on my proposed layout?

Tom G.
 

Re: Forgive my ignorance! Am I creating several reverse loops on my proposed layout?

whmvd
 

HiTom,

You won't regret those changes. That's a lot more reasonable while still giving you lots of options. Like it!
Wouter


On Wed, 13 Mar 2019 at 03:31, Tom G. via Groups.Io <tjg81296=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Made a few updates. Thanks all for the advice.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/oqbriyxcawabj5t/SCARM%20-%20playroomScarm_v30.pdf?dl=0

Re: Forgive my ignorance! Am I creating several reverse loops on my proposed layout?

Mark Cartwright
 

Better....
Tom,

Run some of the Green Track...while also making an attempt to run the Roundtable.
On the way to doing this...
Consider some Structures and Scenery as well as spacing.
I expect a few more epiphanies along the way.
Mark

power supply for servos?

Dave Emery
 

If I go with servo-based switch machines (e.g. Tam Valley or Walthers), how do I power them? It would be a pain in the posterior to have to provision AC and then a bunch of wall-warts around the layout. Has anyone done a ’servo power bus’?

dave

Re: power supply for servos?

Paul O
 

 Dave, I have a 12 V DC power bus that runs around my layout. Then use small adjustable regulators from Banggood.com set to 5 V to power my servos. 

Paul O

Re: power supply for servos?

Jay
 

Hi!
You power both systems from the DCC Bus or a 12v supply.
The control boards supply the power to the servos.

Jay

Re: Fw: binding wires in DCC installation

wirefordcc
 

A friend of mine uses a different approach to keeping wires out of the motor of a locomotive.  He uses Aleene's Tack-It  Over and Over.  You can use the adhesive to hold down wires and you can peel them up and move them later.  I've seen him use this stuff.  Appears to be a good idea if it holds up over the years.  You can get this adhesive at craft stores.

Allan Gartner
Wiring For DCC

Re: power supply for servos?

Keith Elrod
 

Walthers makes a 12v PS {filtered} to go with their new LCC switch control;.

Keith 

On Wed, Mar 13, 2019 at 3:50 PM Dave Emery via Groups.Io <deemery=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
If I go with servo-based switch machines (e.g. Tam Valley or Walthers), how do I power them?  It would be a pain in the posterior to have to provision AC and then a bunch of wall-warts around the layout.  Has anyone done a ’servo power bus’?

        dave



Re: Forgive my ignorance! Am I creating several reverse loops on my proposed layout?

Don Vollrath
 

As updated there are no reversing loops except for the turntable itself.
DonV 

Re: Forgive my ignorance! Am I creating several reverse loops on my proposed layout?

Tom G.
 

Hi Don,

Are the turntables always in need of an auto reverser by default?

Thanks,
Tom




-----Original Message-----
From: Don Vollrath <donevol43@...>
To: w4dccqa <w4dccqa@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Mar 13, 2019 9:57 pm
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Forgive my ignorance! Am I creating several reverse loops on my proposed layout?

As updated there are no reversing loops except for the turntable itself.
DonV 

Turntable Reversing.

Carl
 

Hi Tom:

We added reversing cam switches to the turntable shaft. They work OK, but there is a dead space where we have no tracks.

You can also use a toggle switch and correct the polarity manually.

Carl.

On 3/13/2019 10:19 PM, Tom G. via Groups.Io wrote:
Hi Don,

Are the turntables always in need of an auto reverser by default?

Thanks,
Tom

Virus-free. www.avast.com