Date   
Re: Track Voltage for N Scale Sound Decoders ?

Mark Cartwright
 

Ah?
You might want to consider...Getting that 2-6-6-4 right away and begin to use it as one of your primary track testers....
With SOUND
Not a GP-7 which is one of the easiest locomotives to accommodate to any layout....Well almost.
====
If you are so inclined to longer steam locomotives one day.....
Actually I suggest something with a 10 in it..such as a 2-10-4 and then learn to run it not only on straights or gentle curves as a single unit but pulling an ever increasing length of train; upwards of what ever you and your layout feel comfortable with.
OVER every single Turnout on your layout.
For me that is 60 cars; not 158 which was my prototypical goal.
====
Except...when visiting someone else's layout.
Then ? Yes, it's time to find your best runner over any type of track or grade.
Several of my Kato/Atlas Diesels come to mind.
====
That is with one (fairly affordable) exception....in Steam at $150.


Especially their latest version. This model taught me many things about the general design and engineering of N Scale Locomotives; such as the use of Bearing Blocks on every single driver and the overall balance of a longitudinal array of motor, driving gears and flywheels. Along with simply the way a Tender should be electrified to the wheels.These work well with #6 or #8 Turnouts, with a 6 in the driver array. However, my 2-10-4's seem to prefer #10 or larger turnouts.
:)) Mark

Re: Track Voltage for N Scale Sound Decoders ?

Charles Brumbelow
 

Mark - Do your steam locomotives with 8 connected drivers need #8 or gentler turnouts/switches?

Thanks. Charles



On Friday, February 22, 2019, 2:20 AM, Mark Cartwright via Groups.Io <marcdecapri@...> wrote:

Ah?
You might want to consider...Getting that 2-6-6-4 right away and begin to use it as one of your primary track testers....
With SOUND
Not a GP-7 which is one of the easiest locomotives to accommodate to any layout....Well almost.
====
If you are so inclined to longer steam locomotives one day.....
Actually I suggest something with a 10 in it..such as a 2-10-4 and then learn to run it not only on straights or gentle curves as a single unit but pulling an ever increasing length of train; upwards of what ever you and your layout feel comfortable with.
OVER every single Turnout on your layout.
For me that is 60 cars; not 158 which was my prototypical goal.
====
Except...when visiting someone else's layout.
Then ? Yes, it's time to find your best runner over any type of track or grade.
Several of my Kato/Atlas Diesels come to mind.
====
That is with one (fairly affordable) exception....in Steam at $150.


Especially their latest version. This model taught me many things about the general design and engineering of N Scale Locomotives; such as the use of Bearing Blocks on every single driver and the overall balance of a longitudinal array of motor, driving gears and flywheels. Along with simply the way a Tender should be electrified to the wheels.These work well with #6 or #8 Turnouts, with a 6 in the driver array. However, my 2-10-4's seem to prefer #10 or larger turnouts.
:)) Mark

Re: Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

Jim Keating
 

All,
I have an issue with my Peco Electrofrog turnout with DCC.  It seems that I have may have failed to modify the turnout, and also have definitely failed to connect the frog to my tortoise switch machine for power routing prior to installation on the layout!  OUCH.  Modifying in place will be a pain but I can ultimately manage that :( 
My question is, can I solder a wire to the frog and connect to the tortoise WITHOUT having to completely pull up the turnout and use the provided wire underneath?  Has anyone done this?
Currently, as the turnout is being thrown, I get a short.  Then, once the turnout has completed it's diversion, I can reset the short and visa versa. 
Please advise. 
Thanks, Jim

Re: Track Voltage for N Scale Sound Decoders ?

John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

Charles,

 

My answer may or may not be applicable, depending on the brand in question.  I use PECO code 55 electrofrog turnouts, which strangely enough ALL have #6 frogs.  Small, Medium and Large turnouts have different diverging track curves and lengths.  I have found that all of my locos including 2-8-4s run smoothly through both small and medium turnouts (diverging curves 12” and 18” radius respectively.)

 

That’s the simple version.  The answer may vary with grade, as well as train length.  With the obvious exception of the 12” curve in the turnout itself, my minimum radius is 13 inches.  My passing sidings limit most trains to 22 cars but my 2-8-4 Kanawhas will pull about 30 cars up a 2.7% grade.  Going up a steep grade with more than 20 cars would cause the lead driver would hop the rail on only one curve, causing trouble at the next turnout. Going down, it ran through just fine. It WASN’T the turnout.  Closer examination showed that I had inadvertently laid the curve at 11 inches instead of 13.  Fixing the curve fixed the problem, but it may indicate that a small turnout could be pushing the envelope for a 2-8-4 pulling a heavy load.

 

The C&O didn’t normally run 2-10-4s on the James River line, so I don’t plan to allow for them.  USRA 2-8-8-2s seem to work just fine.

 

If you are using Atlas turnouts, or Peco code 80, the answers may be different.

 

Cheers,

John

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Charles Brumbelow via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2019 10:33 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Track Voltage for N Scale Sound Decoders ?

 

Mark - Do your steam locomotives with 8 connected drivers need #8 or gentler turnouts/switches?

Thanks. Charles



On Friday, February 22, 2019, 2:20 AM, Mark Cartwright via Groups.Io <marcdecapri@...> wrote:

Ah?

You might want to consider...Getting that 2-6-6-4 right away and begin to use it as one of your primary track testers....

With SOUND

Not a GP-7 which is one of the easiest locomotives to accommodate to any layout....Well almost.

====

If you are so inclined to longer steam locomotives one day.....

Actually I suggest something with a 10 in it..such as a 2-10-4 and then learn to run it not only on straights or gentle curves as a single unit but pulling an ever increasing length of train; upwards of what ever you and your layout feel comfortable with.

OVER every single Turnout on your layout.

For me that is 60 cars; not 158 which was my prototypical goal.

====

Except...when visiting someone else's layout.

Then ? Yes, it's time to find your best runner over any type of track or grade.

Several of my Kato/Atlas Diesels come to mind.

====

That is with one (fairly affordable) exception....in Steam at $150.

 

Kato (Japan) JNR C55 4-6-2 Pacific

Kato (Japan) JNR C55 4-6-2 Pacific

 

Especially their latest version. This model taught me many things about the general design and engineering of N Scale Locomotives; such as the use of Bearing Blocks on every single driver and the overall balance of a longitudinal array of motor, driving gears and flywheels. Along with simply the way a Tender should be electrified to the wheels.These work well with #6 or #8 Turnouts, with a 6 in the driver array. However, my 2-10-4's seem to prefer #10 or larger turnouts.

:)) Mark

Re: Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

It sounds like you failed to use insulated joiners on the two inside rails at the point end of the frog.  There is no substitute for doing that.  Once you install the insulated joiners, you may be able to get away without power-routing the frog until the electrical connection through the point rails becomes unreliable and locomotives start losing power as they go through the turnout.

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Keating via Groups.Io
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2019 2:24 PM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

 

All,
I have an issue with my Peco Electrofrog turnout with DCC.  It seems that I have may have failed to modify the turnout, and also have definitely failed to connect the frog to my tortoise switch machine for power routing prior to installation on the layout!  OUCH.  Modifying in place will be a pain but I can ultimately manage that :( 
My question is, can I solder a wire to the frog and connect to the tortoise WITHOUT having to completely pull up the turnout and use the provided wire underneath?  Has anyone done this?
Currently, as the turnout is being thrown, I get a short.  Then, once the turnout has completed it's diversion, I can reset the short and visa versa. 
Please advise. 
Thanks, Jim

Re: Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

wirefordcc
 

Jim,

If you haven't already seen the diagram I have of the Peco Electrofrog on my website, check it out at:

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_peco.htm#a2

I've never soldered to a Peco Electrofrog frog because of the wire they provide, but I have successfully soldered to many frogs of other manufacturers turnouts.  While I think you can solder to the Peco, I suggest perhaps a better course of action for the Peco.  The rails leaving the frog (see my diagram on my website) are part of the frog on a Peco.  Solder to one of the rails shown in green away from the frog.  This is preferred so that you are less likely to melt any ties around the frog and risk messing up the critical alignment of the frog.

To power route the frog, you need to cut the two jumpers I show in my website that say "cut jumpers".  This isolates the frog so that you can power route it.  You can try using a standard old-fashion razor blade to do this from the top of the turnout.  It might be thin enough to get through the gap that Peco provided in the turnout.

Everyone else:

If you install Peco Electrofrog turnouts but initially want to try to use them without power routing the frog, still drop the wire Peco provides that is attached to their frog through your table top.  Attach about 10" of wire to Peco's wire to make it long enough to use later without trying to solder a wire to it later under your benchwork in the future.

Allan Gartner
Wiring For DCC

Re: Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

John Cahill
 

There should be a very fine wire coming out from under the point to the left or right (depending on hand if point) to which you can solder a feed from one of the Tortoise auxiliary switches which are fed by the same busses as feed your track. The bit you may have missed is the two links beneath the point across the insulating plastic you can see from the top. These should have been cut or removed before fitting. 
So my first suggestion is to lift the points and address both these issues. If this is totally impractical (!) then with a very fine disc in a Dremel, you could cut down through the point VERY CAREFULLY which will isolate the frog. Then with careful soldering a wire can be attached to the inside of the frog V and then fed back to the Tortoise switch as above. I have done it with old Electrofrogs made before DCC was common. If possible also wire the fixed blades of the points to their respective buses as this eliminates another DCC weakness in Pecorino points. I have always used Peco EF points on my own DC, DCC and several exhibition layouts and find them very reliable when installed correctly with particular attention to the wiring. Hope this helps!

John

On 22 Feb 2019, at 19:24, Jim Keating via Groups.Io <jim.keating@...> wrote:

All,
I have an issue with my Peco Electrofrog turnout with DCC.  It seems that I have may have failed to modify the turnout, and also have definitely failed to connect the frog to my tortoise switch machine for power routing prior to installation on the layout!  OUCH.  Modifying in place will be a pain but I can ultimately manage that :( 
My question is, can I solder a wire to the frog and connect to the tortoise WITHOUT having to completely pull up the turnout and use the provided wire underneath?  Has anyone done this?
Currently, as the turnout is being thrown, I get a short.  Then, once the turnout has completed it's diversion, I can reset the short and visa versa. 
Please advise. 
Thanks, Jim

Older Shinohara 3 way turnout

Jay
 
Edited

Hi!
I just acquired an older version of this turnout.
It was installed, but going through it, it always shorts out my DCC system.
What's going on?
It is installed like any other switch.
There are Kato & Atlas switches on my layout that work fine.
I forgot to add, this is N Scale.

Jay

Re: Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

Jim Keating
 

Thank you John, I'll check those joiners on the inside rails.

On Friday, February 22, 2019, 3:52:25 PM PST, John Cahill <johncahill25@...> wrote:


There should be a very fine wire coming out from under the point to the left or right (depending on hand if point) to which you can solder a feed from one of the Tortoise auxiliary switches which are fed by the same busses as feed your track. The bit you may have missed is the two links beneath the point across the insulating plastic you can see from the top. These should have been cut or removed before fitting. 
So my first suggestion is to lift the points and address both these issues. If this is totally impractical (!) then with a very fine disc in a Dremel, you could cut down through the point VERY CAREFULLY which will isolate the frog. Then with careful soldering a wire can be attached to the inside of the frog V and then fed back to the Tortoise switch as above. I have done it with old Electrofrogs made before DCC was common. If possible also wire the fixed blades of the points to their respective buses as this eliminates another DCC weakness in Pecorino points. I have always used Peco EF points on my own DC, DCC and several exhibition layouts and find them very reliable when installed correctly with particular attention to the wiring. Hope this helps!

John

On 22 Feb 2019, at 19:24, Jim Keating via Groups.Io <jim.keating@...> wrote:

All,
I have an issue with my Peco Electrofrog turnout with DCC.  It seems that I have may have failed to modify the turnout, and also have definitely failed to connect the frog to my tortoise switch machine for power routing prior to installation on the layout!  OUCH.  Modifying in place will be a pain but I can ultimately manage that :( 
My question is, can I solder a wire to the frog and connect to the tortoise WITHOUT having to completely pull up the turnout and use the provided wire underneath?  Has anyone done this?
Currently, as the turnout is being thrown, I get a short.  Then, once the turnout has completed it's diversion, I can reset the short and visa versa. 
Please advise. 
Thanks, Jim

Re: Track Voltage for N Scale Sound Decoders ?

Mark Cartwright
 

Charles....
I wrote this very long reply, which I believe could have possibly alienated many a Model Railroader of today but not a Model Railroader of say 1934 in his Attic, Basement or Family Room of 25 feet in width.
So I deleted it.
We call this a Missed Approach in aviation.....
Let me go around again....
Here is the phenomenon......
http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/267707.aspx
========
So to answer your question in the most succinct manner possible....
It's the one after the 9 o 9 - The Beatles.
Meaning ....
No, not a #8 for a 8 Drivers nor even a re-created #9 Kato Unitrack Turnout from a #6.
I was using an Atlas #10 for 10 drivers and found even that not the best for locomotives of multiple sets of long drivers such as a 2-8-8-2 with an actual train of 30 or more cars behind it.
=========
Despite what Walter's of Today writes on the Box; their Y6B (2-8-8-2) does not like to pull a train over a #4, but it seems to have no issues with a #12. with 30 cars behind it.
The previous owner of my Y6B, kept sending his back to Walther's...
Three Times and they would pick him out another one...
Never telling him to simply disregard the advertising on the box.
==========
Even without traction tires on a 1.5% Grade.
My previous standard of 1.73% gave me pause to question.
=========
I no longer use traction tires..DCC Sound needs all the help it can get.
=========
So back to the above article....
Do passenger cars derail or uncouple (even in N Scale) as the first writers states on 20, 24 or even 26 inch curves?
Yes  they do on abrupt 90 degree curves with a 21 car passenger train behind three consisted Kato Diesel Locomotives (even though perfectly speed matched).
=====
iN my reality, N Scale begins to seriously open up at 28 inch curves and even the transition to such a curve shoed be gentle....not abrupt at 90 degrees.
=====
I may let the world know when I actually create Success On My Layout and write a book which Kalmbach will never publish; nor be allowed in Train Stores.
=====
Presently, I am experimenting with 28 to 84 inch parabolic curves.
https://www.nmra.org/sites/default/files/d3b3.pdf

But not at the N Scale Level; which was not yet compressed in 1952.
It's the one after the 9 o 9  ...or TT Scale to HO and even O scales which I am currently using; as my basis for Physics.
Lionel O Scale Bridges for example...actually measure out to be N Full Scale.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RES7mnxkYCE
And when one would attempt to actually put an O Scale Ship under such a Lionel Bridge.
https://eaglewingsironcraft.wordpress.com/2012/01/17/o-gauge-vertical-lift-bridge/
Ah?
We are gonna need a smaller boat or get a bigger bridge.
============================
Or better yet known as BNSF Modern Specifications scaled down to Model Railroading.
And everything else too including the width of your Channel.
What I call Full Scale Model Railroading (without compression)
Meaning ?

Yes, I am in the process of learning the Art of Creating #12 (and larger) Turnouts with Fast Track Jigs.
I am placing these on a Wooden HO Scale Tru-scale Base. and beginning to control then with a ESU like Servo motor back to my ESU ECoS.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IYvfKwGppo

Question ? >>> Everything 

The Other Phenomenon....
Which gave ma a What the Hey ?!?!
Nearly everyone of my N Scale Brass Steam Locomotives came to me LNIB.
Never run
Even those which had been converted to DCC with Sound.
Here are some clues.....on the proverbial Hallmark 2-10-4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgwu7ydD4Bw
===> There AIN"T NOTHING WRONG WITH IT !
Just don't expect it to run on 19 inch curves.
When you slop up the drivers so they wiggle to and fro...
Oops !
Then the locomotive may get confused as it tries to traverse a Commensurate Turnout. 
Increase the turnout as well... !
Keep your drivers tight within Box Journals.
Here is another one....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lKP4wSurQ5Y
The Con Car Aero Train.
If you complain to Con For about it...they will send you some weights.
Don't use them....Just go to a wider radius.
Another example is the Kato Shinkansen using Single Viaduct Kato Track....
Won't work..
http://www.jnsforum.com/community/topic/4376-kato-single-track-viaduct-connect-to-viaduct-station/

Kato's Double Viaduct Track has a clearance of 15 mm rather than 10....and I increased even these dimensions when it came to my #9 Kato Turnout.
======
Again as at the first article strongly suggests...
It's the one after what ever the Manufacturer Suggests is where you should begin your track laying efforts.
Today...
There isn't much on my layout that I have not modified from the instant, I took it out of the box.
===================
Except for Lok/More N Scale Steam Locomotives (The best the hobby has ever offered).
I've got to get me one of these.....
http://spookshow.net/loco/more4664.html

And will so, as my reward for creating a layout which can actually run it.
Sorry Spookshow...
19 inch curves ARE THE PROBLEM.
=============================================
I learned as an Aviation Pilot....
Not to simply read and believe the specifications as set forth in written form.
Instead....
Take the Airplane out on your own, and see what you can personally make it do.
Then if you actually do loose an engine on take-off.....
Meaning....
===> I won't fly a Cessna 310 into most small airports.
The roll out procedure on one engine out on take off...exceeds the length of most small airport runways.
They are fine with both engines operating...but is you loose an engine....It will be considered as Pilot Failure to investigate the minimums. and the Insurance may not kick in.
Such as ...
https://www.aviationlawmonitor.com/2010/02/articles/general-aviation/tesla-cessna-310-crash-at-east-palo-alto-the-paradox-of-the-twin/

Yes, this airport and the one North of it too at San Carlos.
====
So a 4-6-6-4 works easier than say a 4-6-2? on the same given trackage?
>>> No 
The Kato 4-6-2 is a phenomenon unto itself.and I strongly suspect a whole other layout will be required to effectively operate a LIK 4-6-6-4.
:)) Mark

Re: Older Shinohara 3 way turnout

Mark Cartwright
 

Ah ?
Jay....
I struggled with Shinohara Track from 1973 to 1982 in a #209 John Armstrong Track Plan.
I haven't got much nice to say about either one of them.
=====
After spending hundreds of hours with an NMRA Gauge, increasing the turnouts and radius from the given plan and soldering the entire layout....
I could not effectively run anything better than a Con For SW 1200 with no more than 5 cars behind it.
======
In 1982, I bought my first house on my first 30 year mortgage. I put that layout up in the attic by 1983, and left it there when I sold that house in 2003.
I did not allow myself to become infatuated with N Scale till 2012, in a whole other this time paid for basement with a house on top AFTER seeing a video on Kato Unitrack.
======
Maybe N Scale ain't so bad....I was considering going back to HO; and began to buy both including O Scale and even G.
======
It was not until 2014, when I even allowed myself to open up my N Scale Time Capsule from 1982.
By that time, I was well on my way to complete DCC with Sound. 
:)) Mark

There might be a Shinohara 3 Way Turnout in that 1982 Drawer.
Do no harm.....
I would feel guilty if I sold it to anyone; but I may use it one day as a partial template.
====
There was a special 3 way electronic switching motor developed for it, in the yet to become Silicon Valley at the still up and running Train Store in Santa Clara in 1977. I may use it one day on a hand laid 3 way switch.

Re: Older Shinohara 3 way turnout

Jay
 

Hi Mark,
I went down to my layout last night.
After a few adult beverages, an idea popped into my brain.
I isolated the switch outputs & powered the 3 out feeds separately.
It looks like the power routing in the switch was interfering with the out feeds.
Now everything works fine.
Apparently after posting new ideas bubbled up.
It was successful evening!


Jay

Aristo Dash 9 DCC

ggagerailer@...
 

Hello,

I put in the AirWire adapta board, G3 Decoder and Phoenix P8 sound in my Aristo Dash 9..  I wired everything according to specifications for the Adapta Board, G3 and  Phoenix P8 Sound Board, including removing the power pickup leads to the motors as I am strictly using battery power.  I left the on board switches in place, hoping that all I needed to do was make sure that the switches were left in the appropriate positions: 

Battery/Track Power  "battery" position
Smoke "on"
Lights "on"
Motor "on"

The G3 decoder is not talking to the remote throttle, even with initial power up, the green light is steady with them G3, but the red light does not come on, which should happen even before it is programmed, as it knows the throttle found the decoder, even before programming.  I than programmed the address and frequency, still nothing. 

I read a procedure from a fellow with the Ottawa Garden Railroad Society in Canada.  With the exception of him using Aristo sound and DCC, the install was very similar. This guy did do a step I have not done that maybe might have some effect but not sure.  I will enclose the link to the page.  
 
 
Look at "REMOVING THE MU CONNECTORS"  I did not think this made much sense to do as the DPDT on board switches would just stay in the "on" position, with the exception Battery/Track Power switch, left in "battery" position. Do I need to do this step so when the MU connectors are plugged back into the main factory circuit board, thing their is not recunant power coming from somewhere else as indicated in the article? And am I doing anything else wrong?  
 
I would appreciate any referral or to pass this on, including my email address.
 
Thanks
Dave
 

Clean Track

Daniel Thomson
 

In recent posts several methods have been mentioned for cleaning track. One we use on the MNSE layouts, both portable and permanent, were learned from a Virginia N-Track group at a national NMRA convention. Using just a few drops on a cloth or woven type furniture glide we find Ronsonol Lighter Fluid to be very effective without being detrimental to the ties or plastic frogs. It also did not leave any oil or lubricating effect on the rails. It IS lighter fluid and should be respected for that in use but is actually less flashy than many other cleaners. People have been carrying it in lighters in their pockets for decades.

I do a lot of model locomotive maintenance both professionally and personally and find contact points the key trouble spots of many different running and DCC control issues. Rail to wheel, wheel to pick-ups, pick-ups to chassis, chassis to boards, boards to motor brush caps, brushes to armatures are all prone to dirt getting in the way. Clean rail is required. For deep cleaning internally I often rely on a contact cleaner. Plastic compatibility is critical. One of the best I have found so far still requires care around paint finishes. That is by Techspray and is their ELine Contact Cleaner, labeled #1622-10S. Do use with proper ventilation.

Regards; Dan T., Pres. MNSE.org

Re: Wiring Peco Electrofrogs

Jim Keating
 

Good info.  Thanks Allan.

On Friday, February 22, 2019, 3:13:26 PM PST, wirefordcc <bigboy@...> wrote:


Jim,

If you haven't already seen the diagram I have of the Peco Electrofrog on my website, check it out at:

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_peco.htm#a2

I've never soldered to a Peco Electrofrog frog because of the wire they provide, but I have successfully soldered to many frogs of other manufacturers turnouts.  While I think you can solder to the Peco, I suggest perhaps a better course of action for the Peco.  The rails leaving the frog (see my diagram on my website) are part of the frog on a Peco.  Solder to one of the rails shown in green away from the frog.  This is preferred so that you are less likely to melt any ties around the frog and risk messing up the critical alignment of the frog.

To power route the frog, you need to cut the two jumpers I show in my website that say "cut jumpers".  This isolates the frog so that you can power route it.  You can try using a standard old-fashion razor blade to do this from the top of the turnout.  It might be thin enough to get through the gap that Peco provided in the turnout.

Everyone else:

If you install Peco Electrofrog turnouts but initially want to try to use them without power routing the frog, still drop the wire Peco provides that is attached to their frog through your table top.  Attach about 10" of wire to Peco's wire to make it long enough to use later without trying to solder a wire to it later under your benchwork in the future.

Allan Gartner
Wiring For DCC

Re: Older Shinohara 3 way turnout

Don Vollrath
 

Jay,
You simply relearned that the original turnouts didn't necessarily cause short circuits on the old DC layouts... but many of them DID do power routing. Trains simply roared through the selected path. The only way to eliminate issues with DCC layouts where one expects all track segments to be properly powered at all times is to either 1) isolate all turnout exit rails and let the throwbar and points select what rail piece gets which stock rail polarity. OR  2) butcher up the individual point rails and frogs so that you can 'manually' manipulate which rail piece gets what polarity at any given moment without causing any shorts when a train rolls through AND during partial/moving  switch throws.

Note that idea 1) can be supplemented with frog juicers, but still may have issues of not being totally 'DCC friendly' as the open point rails will often be at the opposite polarity of the nearby stock rail. This can cause momentary shorts with out of gauge wheel sets or as the long driver wheelbase of the 2-10-2 rolls through.

Idea 2) calls for lots of careful examination, isolation of point rail contact feeds, cutting of additional frog isolating rail gaps, with added feeder wires fed from reliable switching mechanisms coordinated with exact throwbar positioning.

Either way it is up to the engineer to make sure the selected path is what you expect before entering the turnout.

DonV 

Re: Older Shinohara 3 way turnout

Jay
 

Hi Don,
A friend gave this to me, someone gave it to him & he isn't in N Scale.
I could not find any info on the web how to use this with DCC.
I had to add power to the legs as the switch would not supply power to them reliably.
That's when this issue popped up.
It was ahead scratcher for me, it would work on one leg only.
As soon as another leg was switched it would short.
Removing the out feeds stopped the shorting issue.
Putting them back in one at a time worked fine.
As soon as a second one was added, the problem came up.
That's what led me to isolate the the out feeds & power them separately.
A Frog juicer would work, but this turned out to be the cheapest solution.
6 track isolators & some wiring was all it took.
It is now working as it should.

Jay

Re: Cleaners & Lubricants

Alex Hempel
 

I did a run on the weekend over the main parts of my layout with a Proses cleaning car with both dry and wet cleaning action. For lack of anything better, I used Isopropyl Alcohol on the wet pad. It has definitely brought an improvement - one of my locos with sound and light runs smoothly all over the layout now, without flickering lights or sound dropouts. The other, a Bachmann cheapie, still struggles, but from what I can gather from the net, that might just be a crappy decoder...

Wiring a DCC layout

Lead_horse@...
 

Hi I am new too this group and was hoping someone could tell me how to wire up the layout shown in the attachments please. I am completely new too model railways and DCC and also a complete novice with electrical (I know not the best combination). I will be using peco setrack 100 (am I correct in thinking in that I will only have a choice of insulfrogs), all my points and the turntable will be under manual control and the layout will be on a 9ft x 4ft baseboard controlled by a gaugemaster prodigy advance2.
Thank you for any help anyone can provide it will be whole heartedly appreciated.
Paul

Re: Wiring a DCC layout

digitaldanm@...
 

Paul,

Did you intend to attach a file? I'm in a similar situation to you (total newbie) and would love to see your layout and hear folks' responses.

Dan