Date   
Re: Solid vs. Stranded Wire

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

For DCC buss wire use, does it matter if I use SOLID or STRANDED wire ?

Not really. Use either type as you desire.
Stranded is more flexible but may require crimped spade/ring lug connections to screw terminal strips if you use them.
Solid wire can be used with screw terminals without any crimped on lugs. May hold twists better than stranded.
DonV

Solid vs. Stranded Wire

jmscnw <jmscnw@...>
 

For DCC buss wire use, does it matter if I use SOLID or STRANDED wire ?

Re: [NTrakDCCSIG] DecoderPro

Paul Bender <paul.bender@...>
 

Hi Mike,

On December 17, Mike Langford wrote:
Is anyone using DecoderPro for setting up your decoders? If so can I use
the PR1 and the small portable programming box/track I built with it or do I
need to purchase what they recommend to use with it? Just curious...
Nope, you'll need to use another piece of hardware.

At this point in time, If you want a standalone programming track (i.e. one that
is NOT connected to a standard command station) you'll need to obtain an
SPROG-II from http://www.sprog-dcc.co.uk/ I own the serial version of this
device, and they do work very well.

Alternatly, if you really want to use that PR-1, you could volunteer to write a
JMRI driver for it. You don't necessarilly need to be well versed in Java to
do this, but a little low level programming experience would be helpfull
(especially for a device like the PR-1, where most of the code will be low
level code).

Paul

DecoderPro

Michael Langford
 

List,

Is anyone using DecoderPro for setting up your decoders? If so can I use
the PR1 and the small portable programming box/track I built with it or do I
need to purchase what they recommend to use with it? Just curious...

Mike Langford
SOO Line 1966-67
Digitrax User Since 1996

Re: Expanding from a Digitrax Zephyr system to a Super Empire Builder system

Doug Stuard <dstuard@...>
 

The DT400R can be connected to the command station via loconet for
programming. If you are usingthe DB150 as your command station
however, yo will be limited to the DB150 programming features (no CV
readback, no separate programming track).

Or you can re-option your DCS50 as a command station.


6 of one......

Doug


--- In WiringForDCC@..., "Ron Massa" <ron@r...> wrote:

Doug: Thanks for the info! This is all still pretty new to me so
I
appreciate "experienced" advice. Can I connect the DT400R
throttle via
loconet (not in simplex radio mode) and use that for programming
instead of
switching the DCS50 back to command station mode? If not,
switching the
DCS50 back to programming mode in the rare occasion that I need to
program
doesn't seem like a big deal.



Regards,



Ronald A. Massa, Sr.

RMA Electronics, Inc.

35 Pond Park Road, Unit #12

Hingham, MA 02043

TEL: 781-749-9700

FAX: 781-749-9707

Email: ron@r...

Specialists in Vision and Imaging since 1986



-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On
Behalf Of Doug Stuard
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 2:44 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Expanding from a Digitrax Zephyr
system to a
Super Empire Builder system



The DCS50 can be optioned to separate the throttle and booster
functions (and disable the command station) so your DB150 can be
used as the command station. The DCS50 manyual describes how to
do
this.

The DB150 can feed your PM42 and the DCS50 can feed yet another
power district for a total of five.

Keep in mind that the DB150, when use as a command station CANNOT
read back CVs, so you may want to keep the DCS50 so you can switch
it back to command station mode for programming.

Doug Stuard
NVNTRAK


--- In WiringForDCC@..., "ahacman" <ron@r...> wrote:

Last year I purchased a Zephyr starter set with DCS 50 all-
in-
one command station/booster/throttle and use it to run my new
layout
(single power district running two locos on a small layout). It
works great! I just purchased a Radio equipped Super Empire
builder
set for my layout expansion currently under construction with
DT400R
throttle and DB150 command station/booster plus an additional
UT4R
throttle, a PM42, plus some other stuff (will probably expand to
6-
8
loco addresses max. with 2 or 3 users max. at a time).



My question is can I switch my Zephyr DCS 50 to a
throttle and booster only to run my original layout portion
(still
as a single power district) and use my new DB150 as my new
booster/command station driving the new expansion subdivided
into
4
new power districts? I will subdivide my expansion into 4 power
stations (main line, freight yard, side spurs, etc.) so I also
purchased a PM42. Do I have to reprogram my current two locos
to
run from the new command station? Since I will be greatly
expanding
my layout I think I would prefer to switch to the DB150 as my
command station now as it will offer more addresses, etc.
although
I
probably will never exceed the 10 max addresses of the Zephyr
DCS150
so I want to do whatever is easiest. Your advice is greatly
appreciated. Thank you.





http://www.WiringForDCC.com




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<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WiringForDCC> " on the web.


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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Peco double slip insulfrog

JOHN <jcebay@...>
 

hi
I am new myself but my simple understanding is that insulfrog will work
straight out of the box but you will suffer a dead spot especially with slow
moving shunting locos with limited pickup whereas electofrog requires a
little reworking but offers much better continuity of traction current. A
full explantion with diagrams is available on the turnouts section of the
WiringForDCC page.

John

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On
Behalf Of tundrathe
Sent: 14 December 2005 22:09
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Peco double slip insulfrog



I am new to DCC. Why does insulfrog or electrofrog matter in terms of
wiring for DCC.

thanks

Joe Capizzi




--- In WiringForDCC@..., "Elliott Janofsky" <ejanofsky@h...>
wrote:
>
> John, Dale Glower talks about the electrofrog double slip not needing
much.
> Since the insulfrogs of regular type are even more friendly, am assuming
> correctly that nothing has to be done for the double slip either? In
looking
> at it and using it , it seems that way. I guess throwing jumpers in
would
> help it also. Thanks for the answer. Elliott
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "JOHN" jcebay@n...
> To: WiringForDCC@...
> Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2005 2:43 AM
> Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog
>
>
> > Hi
> > I am not sure that you have to do anything with it other than power
it.
> > If you look at the diagram on the wiring for turnouts page then
compare it
> > with the peco insul slip its exactly the same. I haven't laid mine yet
but
> > thats how I see it at the moment. If anybody knows any different
please
> > tell
> > me..................John
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: WiringForDCC@...
> > [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On
> > Behalf Of Elliott Janofsky
> > Sent: 13 December 2005 01:04
> > To: WiringForDCC@...
> > Subject: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog
> >
> >
> > I'm trying to wire a Peco insulfrog double slip to make it more DCC
> > friendly. Any suggestions? Thanks, Elliott
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > http://www.WiringForDCC.com
> >
> >
> >
> > SPONSORED LINKS Lionel model train European model trains Model
> > railroads
> > Ho scale model train Ho model trains Model train n scale
> >
> >
>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> > --
> > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
> >
> > a.. Visit your group "WiringForDCC" on the web.
> >
> > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
> > WiringForDCC-unsubscribe@...
> >
> > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
> > Service.
> >
> >
>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
> > --
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > http://www.WiringForDCC.com
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
>







http://www.WiringForDCC.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Re: Peco double slip insulfrog

tundrathe <tundrathe@...>
 

I am new to DCC. Why does insulfrog or electrofrog matter in terms of wiring for DCC.

thanks

Joe Capizzi

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "Elliott Janofsky" <ejanofsky@h...> wrote:

John, Dale Glower talks about the electrofrog double slip not needing much.
Since the insulfrogs of regular type are even more friendly, am assuming
correctly that nothing has to be done for the double slip either? In looking
at it and using it , it seems that way. I guess throwing jumpers in would
help it also. Thanks for the answer. Elliott
----- Original Message -----
From: "JOHN" jcebay@n...
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2005 2:43 AM
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog


Hi
I am not sure that you have to do anything with it other than power it.
If you look at the diagram on the wiring for turnouts page then compare it
with the peco insul slip its exactly the same. I haven't laid mine yet but
thats how I see it at the moment. If anybody knows any different please
tell
me..................John
-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On
Behalf Of Elliott Janofsky
Sent: 13 December 2005 01:04
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog


I'm trying to wire a Peco insulfrog double slip to make it more DCC
friendly. Any suggestions? Thanks, Elliott





http://www.WiringForDCC.com



SPONSORED LINKS Lionel model train European model trains Model
railroads
Ho scale model train Ho model trains Model train n scale


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

a.. Visit your group "WiringForDCC" on the web.

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
WiringForDCC-unsubscribe@...

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Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: Terminating a Buss Run

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

How about using your last feeder connection along the buss line ?
Would it be okay to " dead end " the wire inside the IDC connector.

Yes, you can end the bus wires at a scotchlok IDC connector that connects the last track drop feeder to the DCC bus.
But be aware that part of the IDC connector requires that the wire insulation actually extends a littler bit past the connector body in order to ensure that the wire remains straight inside the connector.
DonV

Re: Expanding from a Digitrax Zephyr system to a Super Empire Builder system

Ron Massa <ron@...>
 

Doug: Thanks for the info! This is all still pretty new to me so I
appreciate "experienced" advice. Can I connect the DT400R throttle via
loconet (not in simplex radio mode) and use that for programming instead of
switching the DCS50 back to command station mode? If not, switching the
DCS50 back to programming mode in the rare occasion that I need to program
doesn't seem like a big deal.



Regards,



Ronald A. Massa, Sr.

RMA Electronics, Inc.

35 Pond Park Road, Unit #12

Hingham, MA 02043

TEL: 781-749-9700

FAX: 781-749-9707

Email: ron@...

Specialists in Vision and Imaging since 1986

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On
Behalf Of Doug Stuard
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 2:44 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Expanding from a Digitrax Zephyr system to a
Super Empire Builder system



The DCS50 can be optioned to separate the throttle and booster
functions (and disable the command station) so your DB150 can be
used as the command station. The DCS50 manyual describes how to do
this.

The DB150 can feed your PM42 and the DCS50 can feed yet another
power district for a total of five.

Keep in mind that the DB150, when use as a command station CANNOT
read back CVs, so you may want to keep the DCS50 so you can switch
it back to command station mode for programming.

Doug Stuard
NVNTRAK


--- In WiringForDCC@..., "ahacman" <ron@r...> wrote:

Last year I purchased a Zephyr starter set with DCS 50 all-in-
one command station/booster/throttle and use it to run my new
layout
(single power district running two locos on a small layout). It
works great! I just purchased a Radio equipped Super Empire
builder
set for my layout expansion currently under construction with
DT400R
throttle and DB150 command station/booster plus an additional UT4R
throttle, a PM42, plus some other stuff (will probably expand to 6-
8
loco addresses max. with 2 or 3 users max. at a time).



My question is can I switch my Zephyr DCS 50 to a
throttle and booster only to run my original layout portion (still
as a single power district) and use my new DB150 as my new
booster/command station driving the new expansion subdivided into
4
new power districts? I will subdivide my expansion into 4 power
stations (main line, freight yard, side spurs, etc.) so I also
purchased a PM42. Do I have to reprogram my current two locos to
run from the new command station? Since I will be greatly
expanding
my layout I think I would prefer to switch to the DB150 as my
command station now as it will offer more addresses, etc. although
I
probably will never exceed the 10 max addresses of the Zephyr
DCS150
so I want to do whatever is easiest. Your advice is greatly
appreciated. Thank you.





http://www.WiringForDCC.com




_____

YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS



* Visit your group "WiringForDCC
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WiringForDCC> " on the web.


* To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
WiringForDCC-unsubscribe@...
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_____

Re: Terminating a Buss Run

jmscnw <jmscnw@...>
 

Don,

Thanks for options info.

How about using your last feeder connection along the buss line ?
Would it be okay to " dead end " the wire inside the IDC connector.



Just cut the wires off and hold them mechanically in place....Really,
the electrons won't escape. :-)
Adding a wire nut to each wire will help ensure that nothing else
touches it. It could also end at a terminal strip for future expansion
of your empire.
Better yet, the end of the bus run is the ideal place to add an R/C
bus terminator. So put ae point terminal strip there and use the
center terminal for the R & C tiepoint.
DonV

Re: Expanding from a Digitrax Zephyr system to a Super Empire Builder system

Doug Stuard <dstuard@...>
 

The DCS50 can be optioned to separate the throttle and booster
functions (and disable the command station) so your DB150 can be
used as the command station. The DCS50 manyual describes how to do
this.

The DB150 can feed your PM42 and the DCS50 can feed yet another
power district for a total of five.

Keep in mind that the DB150, when use as a command station CANNOT
read back CVs, so you may want to keep the DCS50 so you can switch
it back to command station mode for programming.

Doug Stuard
NVNTRAK


--- In WiringForDCC@..., "ahacman" <ron@r...> wrote:

Last year I purchased a Zephyr starter set with DCS 50 all-in-
one command station/booster/throttle and use it to run my new
layout
(single power district running two locos on a small layout). It
works great! I just purchased a Radio equipped Super Empire
builder
set for my layout expansion currently under construction with
DT400R
throttle and DB150 command station/booster plus an additional UT4R
throttle, a PM42, plus some other stuff (will probably expand to 6-
8
loco addresses max. with 2 or 3 users max. at a time).



My question is can I switch my Zephyr DCS 50 to a
throttle and booster only to run my original layout portion (still
as a single power district) and use my new DB150 as my new
booster/command station driving the new expansion subdivided into
4
new power districts? I will subdivide my expansion into 4 power
stations (main line, freight yard, side spurs, etc.) so I also
purchased a PM42. Do I have to reprogram my current two locos to
run from the new command station? Since I will be greatly
expanding
my layout I think I would prefer to switch to the DB150 as my
command station now as it will offer more addresses, etc. although
I
probably will never exceed the 10 max addresses of the Zephyr
DCS150
so I want to do whatever is easiest. Your advice is greatly
appreciated. Thank you.

Re: Peco double slip insulfrog

Elliott Janofsky <ejanofsky@...>
 

John, Dale Glower talks about the electrofrog double slip not needing much. Since the insulfrogs of regular type are even more friendly, am assuming correctly that nothing has to be done for the double slip either? In looking at it and using it , it seems that way. I guess throwing jumpers in would help it also. Thanks for the answer. Elliott

----- Original Message -----
From: "JOHN" <jcebay@...>
To: <WiringForDCC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2005 2:43 AM
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog


Hi
I am not sure that you have to do anything with it other than power it.
If you look at the diagram on the wiring for turnouts page then compare it
with the peco insul slip its exactly the same. I haven't laid mine yet but
thats how I see it at the moment. If anybody knows any different please tell
me..................John
-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On
Behalf Of Elliott Janofsky
Sent: 13 December 2005 01:04
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog


I'm trying to wire a Peco insulfrog double slip to make it more DCC
friendly. Any suggestions? Thanks, Elliott





http://www.WiringForDCC.com



SPONSORED LINKS Lionel model train European model trains Model railroads
Ho scale model train Ho model trains Model train n scale


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
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a.. Visit your group "WiringForDCC" on the web.

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
WiringForDCC-unsubscribe@...

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
Service.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Expanding from a Digitrax Zephyr system to a Super Empire Builder system

ahacman <ron@...>
 

Last year I purchased a Zephyr starter set with DCS 50 all-in-
one command station/booster/throttle and use it to run my new layout
(single power district running two locos on a small layout). It
works great! I just purchased a Radio equipped Super Empire builder
set for my layout expansion currently under construction with DT400R
throttle and DB150 command station/booster plus an additional UT4R
throttle, a PM42, plus some other stuff (will probably expand to 6-8
loco addresses max. with 2 or 3 users max. at a time).



My question is can I switch my Zephyr DCS 50 to a
throttle and booster only to run my original layout portion (still
as a single power district) and use my new DB150 as my new
booster/command station driving the new expansion subdivided into 4
new power districts? I will subdivide my expansion into 4 power
stations (main line, freight yard, side spurs, etc.) so I also
purchased a PM42. Do I have to reprogram my current two locos to
run from the new command station? Since I will be greatly expanding
my layout I think I would prefer to switch to the DB150 as my
command station now as it will offer more addresses, etc. although I
probably will never exceed the 10 max addresses of the Zephyr DCS150
so I want to do whatever is easiest. Your advice is greatly
appreciated. Thank you.

Re: How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC voltage

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Well...Yes & no. The concepts of modulating one signal (the carrier) with another (the signal) have been around for a long time. Think Radio & TV. Then add the cpmplications of color TV, then hundreds of channels multiplexed on a single cable. They didn't have microcomputers/microcontrollers when those products were invented and sold by the millions. But if you will pardon the pun, you are on the right track. Model RR products are physically small. One COULD use discrete components (Resistors, capacitors, transistors, etc.) to detect and properly decode the composite signal. But without using any integrated circuits you would be talking about thousands of components, in a really big box...And a nightmare of reliability problems. First came Integrated circuits (available in 1960's), then the programmable Microccomputers (1970's), then Microcontrollers (1980's) and other small surface mount components. The basic concepts of DCC were invented in the 1980's but used by only by one or two competitive companies. However, it is the combination of availabity of compact low cost microcontrollers, and the standardization of DCC through efforts of the NMRA, and the mass of interested modelers with money that makes it all available today. The microcontroller does make it possible to fit that much flexible logic in that small of a box at a reasonable price.

So, Yeah. Without the Microcontroller we wouldn't have DCC.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of Aaron Lau
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2005 7:08 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC
voltage


Thank you very much. I have a clearer picture on how signal is
superimposed on AC.

Just for curiousity sake, since this is so simple, why wasn't this
being introduced long time ago...like in the 60's or 70's? What make
it so 'acceptable' in the 90's? The only reason I can of (not even
sure if i am right)is that the signal can only be decoded by a
microcontroller. Am i right to say that?

Aros

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Mark Gurries <gurriesm@c...>
wrote:

I would also add this thought.

Most people only think of "AC" to be 60Hz sinewave power as found
in the
AC power outlet. Thus when the term AC is spoken, people jump to
that
concept of what AC means and stick to it. That is not the persons
fault
for that is often all they ever been exposed to (known) as the
definition.

In reality the meaning of AC goes way beyond that specific
implementation and is more generic and basic at the same time. The
terms AC is short for "Alternating Current". AC simply means
current
that is flowing back and forth changing voltage polarity as it
goes at a
rate described in terms of a frequency.

The definition does NOT include or automatically imply a numerical

Voltage Level
Voltage Frequency
Voltage Waveshape

The everyday 120V 60Hz (Sinewave) AC power is but only ONE possible
implementation of AC current flow that we all know so well. It is
a
fixed 120V current that changes polarity 60 times a second.

Many AC toy transformers (old Lionel) also put out AC power. The
only
difference is that they step down the voltage to something safer
such as
16V. But it is still a 60Hz Sinewave.

So DCC introduces yet another signal the ALSO meets the AC
definition.

Low Voltage, Dual Frequency, SquareWave as Don Described below.
In HO
the voltage is 14.25V, 12V for N scale.

Thus to understand DCC, one must free one's mind from fixed
traditional
definitions of AC power.

Hope this helps.

Quite simple in theory. There are many means to modulate one
signal
with another, but for DCC the
frequency (or period) of each cycle of AC is changed between two
different frequencies to represent a
binary one or zero. This is a form of integral cycle frequency
shift
keying. For DCC the carrier is
a flat-topped rectangular AC rather than sinusoidal.
The detection means simply looks for the zero crossings and
measures
the time between them to
determine if a one or zero is being transmitted.
The DCC communication protocol (the particular language of ones
and
zeroes) is spelled out in the
details found at www.nmra.org.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of Aaron Lau
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2005 6:30 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC
voltage


Hi

Can someone explain to me how signal can be superimposed onto a
AC
voltage? I tried finding websites to explain it in technical
term, but
to no avail.

Generally, I can't picture how this can happen, needless to say
how to
decode it.

Aros






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links










http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links





Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Terminating a Buss Run

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Just cut the wires off and hold them mechanically in place....Really, the electrons won't escape. :-)
Adding a wire nut to each wire will help ensure that nothing else touches it. It could also end at a terminal strip for future expansion of your empire.
Better yet, the end of the bus run is the ideal place to add an R/C bus terminator. So put ae point terminal strip there and use the center terminal for the R & C tiepoint.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of jmscnw
Sent: Tuesday, December 13, 2005 6:07 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Terminating a Buss Run


What is the correct way to terminate a buss run ?

Would you wrap a wire nut around the wire end ?

How about just using IDC connector ?

Terminating a Buss Run

jmscnw <jmscnw@...>
 

What is the correct way to terminate a buss run ?

Would you wrap a wire nut around the wire end ?

How about just using IDC connector ?

Re: Peco double slip insulfrog

JOHN <jcebay@...>
 

Hi
I am not sure that you have to do anything with it other than power it.
If you look at the diagram on the wiring for turnouts page then compare it
with the peco insul slip its exactly the same. I haven't laid mine yet but
thats how I see it at the moment. If anybody knows any different please tell
me..................John

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On
Behalf Of Elliott Janofsky
Sent: 13 December 2005 01:04
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Peco double slip insulfrog


I'm trying to wire a Peco insulfrog double slip to make it more DCC
friendly. Any suggestions? Thanks, Elliott





http://www.WiringForDCC.com



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Re: How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC voltage

Mark Gurries
 

It is not the DCC signal....It is the microprocessor abilities that
prevented this.

The microprocessor in the engine decoder needs to decode the data from
the DCC signal. It must synchronize itself with the DCC packets to know
where to start, then assemble the all the individual bits into a
complete command, interpret the command and finally act on the command
if it was meant for this engine. It needs to do all this and do it in a
very small package and be very low cost.

Microproccessors did not even exist in the 60's. They become known
about in the early 70's, finally powerful enough to be used as a
personal computer in the late 70's culminating in the PC revolution of
the 80's. The 90's brought down cost and size while improving speed and
performance at the same time. There is more to this story...but you get
the idea.

The first 1A decoders used in DCC in the early 90's were all above $50,
supported only one headlight, only worked with short addressing and took
up 3 times as much space. Now you can get them under $15 with multiple
features and functions!

Thank you very much. I have a clearer picture on how signal is
superimposed on AC.

Just for curiousity sake, since this is so simple, why wasn't this
being introduced long time ago...like in the 60's or 70's? What make
it so 'acceptable' in the 90's? The only reason I can of (not even
sure if i am right)is that the signal can only be decoded by a
microcontroller. Am i right to say that?

Aros

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Mark Gurries <gurriesm@c...>
wrote:

I would also add this thought.

Most people only think of "AC" to be 60Hz sinewave power as found
in the
AC power outlet. Thus when the term AC is spoken, people jump to
that
concept of what AC means and stick to it. That is not the persons
fault
for that is often all they ever been exposed to (known) as the
definition.

In reality the meaning of AC goes way beyond that specific
implementation and is more generic and basic at the same time. The
terms AC is short for "Alternating Current". AC simply means
current
that is flowing back and forth changing voltage polarity as it
goes at a
rate described in terms of a frequency.

The definition does NOT include or automatically imply a numerical

Voltage Level
Voltage Frequency
Voltage Waveshape

The everyday 120V 60Hz (Sinewave) AC power is but only ONE possible
implementation of AC current flow that we all know so well. It is
a
fixed 120V current that changes polarity 60 times a second.

Many AC toy transformers (old Lionel) also put out AC power. The
only
difference is that they step down the voltage to something safer
such as
16V. But it is still a 60Hz Sinewave.

So DCC introduces yet another signal the ALSO meets the AC
definition.

Low Voltage, Dual Frequency, SquareWave as Don Described below.
In HO
the voltage is 14.25V, 12V for N scale.

Thus to understand DCC, one must free one's mind from fixed
traditional
definitions of AC power.

Hope this helps.

Quite simple in theory. There are many means to modulate one
signal
with another, but for DCC the
frequency (or period) of each cycle of AC is changed between two
different frequencies to represent a
binary one or zero. This is a form of integral cycle frequency
shift
keying. For DCC the carrier is
a flat-topped rectangular AC rather than sinusoidal.
The detection means simply looks for the zero crossings and
measures
the time between them to
determine if a one or zero is being transmitted.
The DCC communication protocol (the particular language of ones
and
zeroes) is spelled out in the
details found at www.nmra.org.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of Aaron Lau
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2005 6:30 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC
voltage


Hi

Can someone explain to me how signal can be superimposed onto a
AC
voltage? I tried finding websites to explain it in technical
term, but
to no avail.

Generally, I can't picture how this can happen, needless to say
how to
decode it.

Aros






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links










http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links





Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links





Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------

Re: How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC voltage

Aaron Lau <aaronlwc@...>
 

Thank you very much. I have a clearer picture on how signal is
superimposed on AC.

Just for curiousity sake, since this is so simple, why wasn't this
being introduced long time ago...like in the 60's or 70's? What make
it so 'acceptable' in the 90's? The only reason I can of (not even
sure if i am right)is that the signal can only be decoded by a
microcontroller. Am i right to say that?

Aros

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Mark Gurries <gurriesm@c...>
wrote:

I would also add this thought.

Most people only think of "AC" to be 60Hz sinewave power as found
in the
AC power outlet. Thus when the term AC is spoken, people jump to
that
concept of what AC means and stick to it. That is not the persons
fault
for that is often all they ever been exposed to (known) as the
definition.

In reality the meaning of AC goes way beyond that specific
implementation and is more generic and basic at the same time. The
terms AC is short for "Alternating Current". AC simply means
current
that is flowing back and forth changing voltage polarity as it
goes at a
rate described in terms of a frequency.

The definition does NOT include or automatically imply a numerical

Voltage Level
Voltage Frequency
Voltage Waveshape

The everyday 120V 60Hz (Sinewave) AC power is but only ONE possible
implementation of AC current flow that we all know so well. It is
a
fixed 120V current that changes polarity 60 times a second.

Many AC toy transformers (old Lionel) also put out AC power. The
only
difference is that they step down the voltage to something safer
such as
16V. But it is still a 60Hz Sinewave.

So DCC introduces yet another signal the ALSO meets the AC
definition.

Low Voltage, Dual Frequency, SquareWave as Don Described below.
In HO
the voltage is 14.25V, 12V for N scale.

Thus to understand DCC, one must free one's mind from fixed
traditional
definitions of AC power.

Hope this helps.

Quite simple in theory. There are many means to modulate one
signal
with another, but for DCC the
frequency (or period) of each cycle of AC is changed between two
different frequencies to represent a
binary one or zero. This is a form of integral cycle frequency
shift
keying. For DCC the carrier is
a flat-topped rectangular AC rather than sinusoidal.
The detection means simply looks for the zero crossings and
measures
the time between them to
determine if a one or zero is being transmitted.
The DCC communication protocol (the particular language of ones
and
zeroes) is spelled out in the
details found at www.nmra.org.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of Aaron Lau
Sent: Monday, December 12, 2005 6:30 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] How DCC signal is superimposed onto AC
voltage


Hi

Can someone explain to me how signal can be superimposed onto a
AC
voltage? I tried finding websites to explain it in technical
term, but
to no avail.

Generally, I can't picture how this can happen, needless to say
how to
decode it.

Aros






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links










http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links





Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------

Peco double slip insulfrog

Elliott Janofsky <ejanofsky@...>
 

I'm trying to wire a Peco insulfrog double slip to make it more DCC
friendly. Any suggestions? Thanks, Elliott