Date   
Re: headlight in DCC

Paul O
 

Fernando, to keep the headlight on in both directions, change CV33 from a value of 1 to a value of 3.

Look in the technical manual for your decoder for an explanation of "Function Mapping". That will explain how to change the way the function keys operate.

Paul O

Re: 12 volts bulb and DCC

Mark Gurries
 

The problem is easy to understand for there is no difference between burning the locomotive shell and burning your hand with a normal light bulb.

All filament bulbs radiate both light and heat at the same time.  The heat is a byproduct.  The question become how much heat?   Just like our standard light bulb we halve in our homes have watt ratings, so do the small bulbs we used in our locomotives. 

Watts = Volts x Amps.

Simple example of the heat output differences between two bulbs which only differ in voltage rating.

So a 0.1 Amp (100mA) bulb with a voltage rating of:

1.5V would dissipate 1.5V x 0.1A = 0.15Watts.  Warm to the touch.

12V would dissipate 12V x 0.1A = 1.2 Watts.   You would not be able to touch this bulb.

So by just dropping the voltage to 1.5V, we ALMOST reduced the watt rating or heat generated by 10X.

In the real would, 1.5V bulbs draw about around 0.01 Amps for a watt rating of 0.015W.   Now we are approaching almost a 100X reduction in heat from a 12V bulb.  

This is why 1.5V bulbs running at 1.5V are always cool to the touch and 12V bulbs will burn your hand running at 12V.

One of the characteristics of model railroad light bulbs are the fact they are so physically small they represent a point source (concentration) of high temperature heat.

Additional factors that make this 12V lamp a big problem for DCC that did not exist with DC. 

1) Introduction of Engineering Plastics.   DCC appeared during a time frame where high tech engineering plastics have been introduced too.  These new plastics offer supper detailed shells for engines.  This same plastic also appears to have a lower heat or melting threshold that the older thick plastic shells.  They also are much thinner which makes the thermal melting problem worse since thinner plastic cannot carry as much heat away from the heat source.   It has a poorer heat dissipation capability which means the plastic will get hotter from the same heat source than the old thick plastic did. 

2) DCC allows one to have constant full power lighting without the engine moving.  That means when a given bulb is turned on, it is receiving the full track voltage which is a regulated voltage someplace between 12V and 16V depending on the scale.   As was stated before, you never had a DC system running at that voltage because that would force the engine to run at full speed at that same track voltage.  Track voltage = Motor speed.  In other words, at typical running speeds, the light was a lot dimmer putting out a lot less heat due to the track voltage was a lot less than 12V.

LEDs do not generate any heat of any consequence, are a lot brighter and unlike a bulb, will never burnout in the locomotives lifetime.




On Jan 12, 2015, at 12:14 PM, richg_1998@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

i guess I should include the link. Some will never search.

http://tinyurl.com/m35c6ac

Rich

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: 12 volts bulb and DCC

richg_1998@...
 

i guess I should include the link. Some will never search.

http://tinyurl.com/m35c6ac

Rich

Re: 12 volts bulb and DCC

richg_1998@...
 

i did a Google search for

dcc 12volt bulbs plastic shell

Came up with many results and warnings. Experiences from a few.
i belong to 20 train groups/forums for some years.

Rich

Re: headlight in DCC

fernando nunes
 

Craig,

The decoder is a ESU V4.0,

Fernando 

Re: headlight in DCC

Craig Zeni
 

On Jan 12, 2015, at 10:58 AM, lopesnunes@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:




Hello everybody,



When a loco runs forward in DCC the headlight, linked to the white wire of the decoder, is on (provided the F0 button is on), and in reverse direction it turns off. Is there any way to keep the headlight on, in reverse direction, if I wish to, though still linked to the white wire? (don’t want to assign it to aux1 or 2).
Absolutely...it varies from decoder to decoder though so we need to know which decoder you're using. I usually set up my decoders with the front and rear lights on separate functions and if the decoder allows it I'll put a 'dim' function on one of the function buttons.


Craig Zeni
Cary NC

headlight in DCC

fernando nunes
 

Hello everybody,


When a loco runs forward in DCC the headlight, linked to the white wire of the decoder, is on (provided the F0 button is on), and in reverse direction it turns off. Is there any way to keep the headlight on, in reverse direction, if I wish to, though still linked to the white wire? (don’t want to assign it to aux1 or 2).


Fernando 

Re: 12 volts bulb and DCC

Annette and Dante Fuligni
 

Bob,

All the locos involved have plastic shells.

Dante

Re: 12 volts bulb and DCC

Robert Heroux
 

Dante -

I would say you did have good fortune smiling upon you and you may want to by some lottery tickets.. LOL  I have seen some get by with 12 volt only to find out later they were Brass loco’s with poor after market paint jobs and not plastic… Live and learn.

Bob







Robert Heroux
ACCU-LITES, Inc.
Your DCC Center
118 S. Main St. STE 5
Wauconda, IL 60084

Phone: 847.224.7914
FAX: 847.487.2089
NMRA Member # 143811


Re: 12 volts bulb and DCC

Annette and Dante Fuligni
 

I rather doubt that good fortune has anything to do with my experience with 12v bulbs. The principles of physics apply to matters such as lamp voltage (and the heat generated thereby) and the characteristics of materials such as plastic. These are not subject to luck. And before installing the TCS decoders, I checked their website installation examples. There were no warnings regarding bulb wattages (one example did change to LEDs but without mention of concern for plastic melting.

Dante

Auto Reverse Section question

mooredw@...
 

Hi all
I added a pdf file to the files section "autoreversesection-WestboroCentralRR.pdf"

Could anyone look at it and comment on it - I think the area in orange is all I need to have  covered by my AR.

Thanks
Dave
Ottawa, ON, Canada


Re: Switch machine auxilary contacts

CS_listes
 

Hello Dale,
Thank you for the scheme and for the explanations.
Good day.
Charles Soubiran.
Posted by: @selkirk5934 dale_gloer
> I have uploaded a quick hand drawing of a circuit that will do what you need to the FILES section. It is called Relay Schematic.
Bonjour Dale,
Merci pour le schéma et pour les explications.
Bonne journée.
Charles Soubiran.

New file uploaded to WiringForDCC

WiringForDCC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the WiringForDCC
group.


File : /AutoReverseSection-WestboroCentralRR.pdf
Uploaded by : mooredw01 <mooredw@...>
Description :


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/WiringForDCC/files/AutoReverseSection-WestboroCentralRR.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
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Regards,


mooredw01 <mooredw@...>

Re: Newbie DS 64 programming question

wirefordcc
 

I'm an old timer - I have DS-54's - the DS-64's predecessor. The DS-54 has a button you press and hold to set its address.  Then when you send it a turnout number to set its address, only it changes.  All the other DS-54's, which I didn't press the button on, keep whatever address I had previously put in them.  I know this works because I just did it about a week ago.


If the DS-64 works anything like this - meaning you do something to the DS-64 you want to affect and don't do anything to the others, you should be fine to try it.


Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC


Newbie DS 64 programming question

chrisn2goldens@...
 

If I have 2 or more DS 64's connected via a loconet cable and want to reprogram the switch (turnout) numbers on one of the DS 64's, do I need to reprogram it offline or online will all the other DS64's ignore the switch signals except the one that has been put in the mode to receive the new switch numbers?  Thanks


Re: Altering LED light strands for layout use

dvollrath@...
 

Cameron, One other thought. There are commercial LEDs out there that have built-in resistors such that each LED is rated to operate directly from 5 or 12V DC. Note that 25 LEDs in a string x 5V = 125V. If you cannot find the location of the current limiting device, pull out one of the LEDs and use your voltmeter to see what voltage is actually across the LED connections when it is carefully wired back into the socket connections. If it is greater than 3.5V, there is probably an integrated  resistor inside. [Or investigate it separately using a 9V battery and external resistors to limit current. Start with a relatively high resistance, say 8-10k and lower it until the LED appears to be the same brightness as when energized in the original string.] If that is the case you can rewire as desired using individual LED parts to operate from a different voltage source of your liking.


As I said before... Don't increase the current beyond what was in the original application as you will seriously shorten the lifetime.


DonV   

Re: Altering LED light strands for layout use

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

I wouldn’t mess with trying to increase the brightness of the individual LEDs themselves as you would be altering their current… and lifetime. But yeah… if you bypass one of the LEDs the current of others would increase, but with little noticeable increase in the brightness.

 

You would be better off simply rebundling them to be two together to yield similar brightness of each C7 type bulb in a continuous string from ‘house to house’. If you don’t need 25 locations or want more linear space between houses, cover (paint?) the LEDs you do not use.

 

But Yeah, all the individual voltage drops of each LED (apparently in your case 25 in a series string) lead up to 65-80 volts of total voltage drop, and there is a resistor or inductor somewhere in that string to limit the current from the 120Vac plug. Look for a rectangular ‘blob’ somewhere in the wiring string. I might be molded into the male plug end. Get out your ohmmeter and find it.

 

But remember that you are dealing with something designed for 120Vac. LEDs are diodes that conduct current in only one direction. The strings might be arranged where one grouping of 25 carries the (+) current and the second grouping wired in anti-parallel carries the (-) current. Each LED tends to ‘sparkle’ or flicker at 30 Hz from 120V, 60 Hz power.

I have also seen 2 LEDs connected anti-parallel within the same plastic housing to directly work from AC current. Still need a mechanism to limit current.

 

Either way, it is difficult to fiddle with commercial LED wiring without knowing for sure what and where the current limiting element(s) are located. Be careful to not alter the actual LED current and to not create a fire hazard for your household. Anything that plugs into a wall outlet should be UL listed according to your insurance company.

 

DonV  

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 09, 2015 10:09 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Altering LED light strands for layout use

 



I hope this is a good place to ask this question.
I incorporate Porcelain houses into my Christmas display.
The houses are designed for C7, 7 watt bulbs.
I purchased several strands of LED Christmas lights to use in my display.
I found that 2 bulbs gave about the same of light as the C7.
I know little about LED lights.

I am assuming that the stand of 50 lights in 2 power districts have build in resistors.

IF a bulb is removed the complete section is DEAD.

Now for the question,
Is it possible to remove a bulb, connect the wire ends, as if no bulb existed?
IF a group of 25 LED were to be stripped down to 12, keeping math relatively simple, would the LED be brighter?
I do not know where the resistor is in the stand, would it need to be replaced do a different size and or would the LED be brighter with the reduction of number of LEDs lit?

Again, not knowing LED physics, am I looking at any fire hazard with this thought process?

Just to add to the reasoning of my question, the LEDs on the strand are too close to each other and I have about 2/3 of the lights under the layout doing me no good.  I want to decrease the number and increase the brightness.

Thank you for all input and suggestions.

Cameron D
NE Florida

 




Re: Switch machine auxilary contacts

Dale Gloer
 

Hello Charles, I deleted a previous post to added this updated one.

I assume that both rails of the two tracks leading away from the frog of the switch are gapped at the switch.

You need a monostable relay with at least DPDT contacts capable of handling 5 amps minimum.  The relay should be capable of operating continuously on low voltage depending on what power supply you may have available - 12 VDC is a good choice.  Since you are in France I do not know how to suggest a particular make or brand.  You will have to get help locally for that.

I have uploaded a quick hand drawing of a circuit that will do what you need to the FILES section.  It is called Relay Schematic.

I hope this helps you.

Dale Gloer

New file uploaded to WiringForDCC

WiringForDCC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the WiringForDCC
group.


File : /Relay schematic.PDF
Uploaded by : dale_gloer <@selkirk5934>
Description : A Quick diagram to answer a specific question


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/WiringForDCC/files/Relay%20schematic.PDF


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


dale_gloer <@selkirk5934>

Altering LED light strands for layout use

Cameron Davis
 

I hope this is a good place to ask this question.
I incorporate Porcelain houses into my Christmas display.
The houses are designed for C7, 7 watt bulbs.
I purchased several strands of LED Christmas lights to use in my display.
I found that 2 bulbs gave about the same of light as the C7.
I know little about LED lights.

I am assuming that the stand of 50 lights in 2 power districts have build in resistors.

IF a bulb is removed the complete section is DEAD.

Now for the question,
Is it possible to remove a bulb, connect the wire ends, as if no bulb existed?
IF a group of 25 LED were to be stripped down to 12, keeping math relatively simple, would the LED be brighter?
I do not know where the resistor is in the stand, would it need to be replaced do a different size and or would the LED be brighter with the reduction of number of LEDs lit?

Again, not knowing LED physics, am I looking at any fire hazard with this thought process?

Just to add to the reasoning of my question, the LEDs on the strand are too close to each other and I have about 2/3 of the lights under the layout doing me no good.  I want to decrease the number and increase the brightness.

Thank you for all input and suggestions.

Cameron D
NE Florida