Date   
Re: DCC HO DC Question

Blair & Rasa
 

Mark,
Yes, this is true- most AC consumer products do NOT fare well on DC.
Effectively, Digitrax, and perhaps others, appear to have "built in"
protection against DC reversal, a common source of damage for many other
product lines; for example, when you go out and buy a replacement 3rd party
wall wart that has -9V on the center of the connector, instead of +9V, and
your precious calculator calculates it's last. Anyway, the built in
protection of a bridge rectifier is nice, but it "costs" you in terms of
voltage overhead. When users complain of their DCS100 units overheating,
that rectifier is one (but only one) of the contributors to that
overheating.

We're on the same wavelength, as I'm EE technologist. I asked my question
intending to get feedback on operational satisfaction at 12VDC input from
people who would be cognizant of the issues, not to find out about DCC
system inputs - but I'm sure this is all interesting to others, as well.
And your explanation is, as usual, succinct.

Thanks
Blair

Re: DCC HO DC Question

Jan Frelin <jan.frelin@...>
 

I was clearly wrong! I've always used AC power for my Lenz boosters, but
checking the documentation I note they too allow DC power.
/Jan

At 14:15 2005-07-12 -0700, Mark Gurries wrote:

Jan

1. The DCC systems I've encountered all required AC input. Have you
found
one that runs on DC power?
Disclaimer: Consult with the DCC products manufacture for both DC and AC
capability before attempting to do anything.

Being familiar with DCC system internals in general (common circuits
shared by all), if a DCC system can take a low voltage AC input (less
than 30V), it will still work with a DC input.

A bridge rectifier converts AC power to DC power by "untangling" the
constant voltage reversal AC power present such that the voltage becomes
steady with one fixed polarity. If you present DC power to the input
designed for AC, all the bridge rectifier does is make sure the input DC
polarity will be matched to the required polarity inside the DCC system.

A less scientific way of stating this another way:

Think of the external DC power as being AC power source that suddenly
"Froze" at one polarity forever. The bridge rectifier does not care
what the polarity is at any given time because it job by definition is
to "on the fly" correct the polarity to match what is required inside.
So if the AC freezes, so does the rectifier in one rectification mode.
Hence the DC passes right through the rectifier to DC again.

This "capability" is limited to DCC products as far as my discussion
applies. Do not assume that above applies to every device especially
devices that run from 110/220VAC! See disclaimer.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
<http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html>http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
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Re: Automatic Train Control

Jan Frelin <jan.frelin@...>
 

We're still considering a DCC solution, not in the least because of the
opprtunity of controling some accesories with the computer while you're at
it. Thus I have some followup question to this list:

1) What are the options for arranging feedback regarding stock position
with DCC? The basic scenario is still a tram going back and forth between
two locations.

2) We require a pair of working crossing gates, which need to do the
following: a) start ringing bells to warn traffic. b) start closing 10
seconds later c) grow silent when down d) open silently. An interesting
automation project. Any ideas?

/Jan

At 11:18 2005-07-01 -0700, Mark Gurries wrote:

Friends,

My club has a requirement for a tram that just goes back and forth
between it's terminal track and staging/storage. We want this to be
automatically controled. There are several kits for doing just this on
the market, but all I have found are DC based. As this track is
connected with the general layout, we would prefer a DCC solution, but
this seems to require a computer, a computer interface, and track
detectors.

My question is: Is there a simpler solution with DCC? What's the
cheapest DCC-based solution (without building your own hardware or
sofware)?
Nothing is simpler or more cost effective than a DC solution.

DCC has layout automation software for DCC.

<http://www.freiwald.com/>http://www.freiwald.com/

is an example of such software.

But you will need a computer, a computer interface to the DCC system,
sensors in the track (DC will need that too) and do some programming.

Definitely more expensive and requires a computer running to make it
happen. The DC solution would be hands off easy to setup and forget.

Some thoughts...

Generally mixing DC and DCC is not recommended by anyone. I can result
in destruction of a booster, DC throttle or both if both power sources
connect to each other. (DCC is a form of AC power) If you must run DC,
the recommendation is that one have a master switch that toggle the
whole layout between DC or DCC but NEVER both at the same time. Many
layouts have done this successfully. There was an article about how one
club did it in MR magazine.

If you MUST have DC and DCC present, there are some recommended rules.

1) Isolate at least a 12: section of track the goes between the DC power
section of the layout and the DCC powered portion of the layout. A no
mans land with not power. Using a momentary center off switch, you
would toggle the power of the dead section of track to DC or DCC
depending on which side of the dead section of track you need to get
power from. The key is momentary switch. A standard toggle will no be
safe for you will forget to turn it off.

2) Another option to isolate the approach track from the DCC portion of
the layout and power it through a Lenz LT100.

<http://www.lenz.com/products/modules/index.htm>http://www.lenz.com/products/modules/index.htm

The LT100 is connected to your DC power pack output. It monitors for
signs of DCC and will instantly disconnect the DC power pack from the
track protecting both system.

I should say that running a locomotive from DC section of track to a DCC
section of track can lead to a runaway locomotive. Most decoder make a
decision on first power up to run in DCC or DC mode. As long as power
is maintained, that decision remains true. So if the decoder see DCC
power after while it has been running in DC mode, the decoder will not
recognize the DCC and assume the DCC is nothing more than full throttle
DC power and vrooom.....

The reverse DCC to DC is less predictable. The engine may simple stop
and not run OR switch to DC mode with a very erratic reaction in the
process.

Part of the randomness to all this is the nature of an engine rolling on
track with the corresponding momentary loss of power. Dirt, oxidation,
clean wheel, number of wheel pickups and other such factor play into the
experience.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
<http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html>http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
<http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/>http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------


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Re: Automatic Train Control

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

re - position fedback
2 or 3 possibilities:
1) Use electrical current detection at separate sections of the track from loco/tram occupation and/or each car. break track up into insulated detection blocks. Detect small current drain at each block. May require conductive axles on each car. Occupation detector output signals report back to master computer or local signal operating apparatus. Requires insulated rail gaps & electronic current detectors for each block.
2) Use magnetic passage scheme with magnetic reed switches at specific points along the track path. Tram and or cars have under carriage magnets to activate switches. Since switch activation would be momentary, master computer must keep track of which switch is being passed and direction from last detection. A "spot" location sensor like this is useful for a specific location, like crossing signal activation. Magnets attract 'metal dirt'.
3) Optical version of #2 with visible or infra-red light beam. May operate as across-track blockage type or reflection of beam off side or bottom of rolling stock. Simple opto-sensors use train shadowing of room light and therefore won't work in the dark. Some electronics required either way. Could also use ultrasonic detectors in similar fashion.
4) Use combination of scheme #1 with #2 or #3. Place optical sensors at both ends of electrical detection blocks. Diode couple signals to 'Wire-OR' the block end sensors with the output of the track current sensor for that block. Now block occupancy will be detected as loco with current draw has left block but rear of train is still occupying the block without need for conductive axles on rolling stock (!).

The above schemes will work with DC or DCC with proper choice of apparatus.

5) For DCC only, use Digitrax or other brand transponder idea. Requires: a) insulated track blocks with transponder type reciever wired to each block; b) transponder in each loco/tram or car to be detected; c) computer to gather transponder indications and keep track of train/tram locations. Available equipment is brand dependant.

6) Track current detectors also come in many flavors. Some work with DC, some only with DCC, some can do both. Some are isolated from track power, some not. Many have universal 'open collector' type outputs and can be used with 5V or 12V signaling. Some are 5V only. Be careful to pick the right one.

My choice is #4 with track current sensors and reflective type IR spot sensors.
Your automated tram application would be greatly simplified if you provided a reversing track loop at each end of the display rather than having the tram actually run in the opposite direction.

re - crossing signal activation
Your requirements are not too difficult. Requires 3 short block occupancy sensors at grade crossing to detect train approaching from either direction and to detect when it leaves the crossing island. Simple logic and timers do the rest. If you have computer, use that to perform logic and provide bell sound. (Bell doesn't remain ON when gate is down??). Check Dallee electronics (and others) for commercial equipment. A couple of '555 timers cam be made to do all without a computer. See future article in Clear Block.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of Jan Frelin
Sent: Thursday, July 14, 2005 4:17 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Automatic Train Control


We're still considering a DCC solution, not in the least because of the
opprtunity of controling some accesories with the computer while you're at
it. Thus I have some followup question to this list:

1) What are the options for arranging feedback regarding stock position
with DCC? The basic scenario is still a tram going back and forth between
two locations.

2) We require a pair of working crossing gates, which need to do the
following: a) start ringing bells to warn traffic. b) start closing 10
seconds later c) grow silent when down d) open silently. An interesting
automation project. Any ideas?

/Jan

At 11:18 2005-07-01 -0700, Mark Gurries wrote:

Friends,

My club has a requirement for a tram that just goes back and forth
between it's terminal track and staging/storage. We want this to be
automatically controled. There are several kits for doing just this on
the market, but all I have found are DC based. As this track is
connected with the general layout, we would prefer a DCC solution, but
this seems to require a computer, a computer interface, and track
detectors.

My question is: Is there a simpler solution with DCC? What's the
cheapest DCC-based solution (without building your own hardware or
sofware)?
Nothing is simpler or more cost effective than a DC solution.

DCC has layout automation software for DCC.

<http://www.freiwald.com/>http://www.freiwald.com/

is an example of such software.

But you will need a computer, a computer interface to the DCC system,
sensors in the track (DC will need that too) and do some programming.

Definitely more expensive and requires a computer running to make it
happen. The DC solution would be hands off easy to setup and forget.

Some thoughts...

Generally mixing DC and DCC is not recommended by anyone. I can result
in destruction of a booster, DC throttle or both if both power sources
connect to each other. (DCC is a form of AC power) If you must run DC,
the recommendation is that one have a master switch that toggle the
whole layout between DC or DCC but NEVER both at the same time. Many
layouts have done this successfully. There was an article about how one
club did it in MR magazine.

If you MUST have DC and DCC present, there are some recommended rules.

1) Isolate at least a 12: section of track the goes between the DC power
section of the layout and the DCC powered portion of the layout. A no
mans land with not power. Using a momentary center off switch, you
would toggle the power of the dead section of track to DC or DCC
depending on which side of the dead section of track you need to get
power from. The key is momentary switch. A standard toggle will no be
safe for you will forget to turn it off.

2) Another option to isolate the approach track from the DCC portion of
the layout and power it through a Lenz LT100.

<http://www.lenz.com/products/modules/index.htm>http://www.lenz.com/products/modules/index.htm

The LT100 is connected to your DC power pack output. It monitors for
signs of DCC and will instantly disconnect the DC power pack from the
track protecting both system.

I should say that running a locomotive from DC section of track to a DCC
section of track can lead to a runaway locomotive. Most decoder make a
decision on first power up to run in DCC or DC mode. As long as power
is maintained, that decision remains true. So if the decoder see DCC
power after while it has been running in DC mode, the decoder will not
recognize the DCC and assume the DCC is nothing more than full throttle
DC power and vrooom.....

The reverse DCC to DC is less predictable. The engine may simple stop
and not run OR switch to DC mode with a very erratic reaction in the
process.

Part of the randomness to all this is the nature of an engine rolling on
track with the corresponding momentary loss of power. Dirt, oxidation,
clean wheel, number of wheel pickups and other such factor play into the
experience.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
<http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html>http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
<http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/>http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------


http://www.WiringForDCC.com

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Re: Automatic Train Control

Mark Gurries
 

Typically you need to find the software first and then find the hardware
that will allow this to work. What you ask for any of the high end DCC
system will work in this application. Occupancy detectors can detect
the tram at the end of the lines, which is read by the computer over a
feedback bus of some kind which will then change the direction of the
tram. Back and forth forever.

As far as the specifics of the crossing sound and motion, that a
seperate system typically independent of the DCC system.

Hope this helps.

We're still considering a DCC solution, not in the least because of the
opprtunity of controling some accesories with the computer while you're
at
it. Thus I have some followup question to this list:

1) What are the options for arranging feedback regarding stock position
with DCC? The basic scenario is still a tram going back and forth
between
two locations.

2) We require a pair of working crossing gates, which need to do the
following: a) start ringing bells to warn traffic. b) start closing 10
seconds later c) grow silent when down d) open silently. An interesting
automation project. Any ideas?

/Jan

At 11:18 2005-07-01 -0700, Mark Gurries wrote:

Friends,

My club has a requirement for a tram that just goes back and forth
between it's terminal track and staging/storage. We want this to be
automatically controled. There are several kits for doing just this
on
the market, but all I have found are DC based. As this track is
connected with the general layout, we would prefer a DCC solution,
but
this seems to require a computer, a computer interface, and track
detectors.

My question is: Is there a simpler solution with DCC? What's the
cheapest DCC-based solution (without building your own hardware or
sofware)?
Nothing is simpler or more cost effective than a DC solution.

DCC has layout automation software for DCC.

<http://www.freiwald.com/>http://www.freiwald.com/

is an example of such software.

But you will need a computer, a computer interface to the DCC system,
sensors in the track (DC will need that too) and do some programming.

Definitely more expensive and requires a computer running to make it
happen. The DC solution would be hands off easy to setup and forget.

Some thoughts...

Generally mixing DC and DCC is not recommended by anyone. I can
result
in destruction of a booster, DC throttle or both if both power sources
connect to each other. (DCC is a form of AC power) If you must run
DC,
the recommendation is that one have a master switch that toggle the
whole layout between DC or DCC but NEVER both at the same time. Many
layouts have done this successfully. There was an article about how
one
club did it in MR magazine.

If you MUST have DC and DCC present, there are some recommended rules.

1) Isolate at least a 12: section of track the goes between the DC
power
section of the layout and the DCC powered portion of the layout. A no
mans land with not power. Using a momentary center off switch, you
would toggle the power of the dead section of track to DC or DCC
depending on which side of the dead section of track you need to get
power from. The key is momentary switch. A standard toggle will no
be
safe for you will forget to turn it off.

2) Another option to isolate the approach track from the DCC portion
of
the layout and power it through a Lenz LT100.

<http://www.lenz.com/products/modules/index.htm>http://www.lenz.com/
products/modules/index.htm

The LT100 is connected to your DC power pack output. It monitors for
signs of DCC and will instantly disconnect the DC power pack from the
track protecting both system.

I should say that running a locomotive from DC section of track to a
DCC
section of track can lead to a runaway locomotive. Most decoder make
a
decision on first power up to run in DCC or DC mode. As long as power
is maintained, that decision remains true. So if the decoder see DCC
power after while it has been running in DC mode, the decoder will not
recognize the DCC and assume the DCC is nothing more than full
throttle
DC power and vrooom.....

The reverse DCC to DC is less predictable. The engine may simple stop
and not run OR switch to DC mode with a very erratic reaction in the
process.

Part of the randomness to all this is the nature of an engine rolling
on
track with the corresponding momentary loss of power. Dirt,
oxidation,
clean wheel, number of wheel pickups and other such factor play into
the
experience.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
<http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html>http://www.
siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
<http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/>http://members.ebay.com/
aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------


http://www.WiringForDCC.com

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Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------

Re: Automatic Train Control

hinman_michael <hinman_michael@...>
 

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "Jan Frelin" <jan.frelin@l...>
wrote:
Friends,

My club has a requirement for a tram that just goes back and forth
between it's terminal track and staging/storage.
Jan,

I have an Idea to share, but first I would like to stress that I am
an amateur and no portion of what follows has been tested. The only
hardware involved is an auto-reverser. Basically you create two
insulated track sections connected to your existing track. The
middle section is connected to the autoreverse and is the route
traveled by your tram. The outer portions( an end peice and the
connection to your layout) are connected to your DCC but wired for
opposite polarity. A DC engine placed in the middle section will
travel to each insulated joint where it will trigger the AR. A DC
engine will only do this facing one direction so you may have to
change polarity of the whole she-bang if you want the loco facing a
particular way. When the tram reverses it will be abrupt and the
track will be @12vdc all the time so it will basically be running
full throttle. This whole set up would theoretically work with a DCC
loco, then you would have speed control, but... I have no idea how
decoders react to having their polarity abruptly changed.

Hopefully I have clearly conveyed the concept. I'd like to hear
form the voice of experience on this as I plan to incorporate it
into my layout in the next few months.

good luck,
mike

Installing sound decoders in P2K GP7 & 9s

brian1961go <brian1961go@...>
 

Anyone provide advice on installing sound decoders in P2k GP7 or 9s.
Where do I put the speaker?

I can just sell my older ones and buy new engines with sound but I
have super-detailed two of the engines so I need help in installing
the sound decoder.

TIA, Brian

DCC installs in brass steam?

brian1961go <brian1961go@...>
 

I have learned that is fairly difficult and/or expensive to install
decoders into brass due to isolating the frame. Does anyone have any
suggestions?

My one thought is to have stock car with several different sound
decoders based on engine type and always have it hooked to the tender
but how do I wire it with just one speaker?

TIA, Brian

DIGITRAX TRANSPONDING/DETECTION

mmogen2004
 

Allan,

Mike Mogensen here perplexed as usual in Indy.

Was wondering if you or any member has had first hand experience
implementing transponding/detection using BDL162 and RX4.

I read all the info I could get before starting, both the manuals that
came with the units and also Loy's DCC Encyclopedia.

I wired the BDL and RX4 up on a board and then applied the section in
the RX4 manual (8.6) to test it on a piece of flex track using one
zone.
I used a loco with a DN163AO decoder, with CV61 set to 002 to perform
the testing.

Detection works OK using the LT5 tester and the correct diodes light
up to detect occupancy so am satified that detection works as it
should but I get no indication of transponding either in the BDL 162
or on the DT400 throttle using the FIND key.

I double checked all the wiring and OPS Switches on the BDL using the
troubleshooting tips in both the manuals and the DCC Encyc and am
satisfied that all are correctly set; still no transponding.

Maybe the magic wand or secret incantation was omitted from the
packaging?

I know this can be a complicated subject but everything I read doesn't
seem to indicate and impossible implemantation.

Thanks,
Mike

Hornby zero1 & DCC

velocmac350 <larby@...>
 

I have operated my large layout by zero 1 for years with no problems
and underestand that it operates by a analog signal transported on a
20volt dc supply to the track which is now obsolete. and IS NOT DCC.

To change over would cost over £1000 with ZTC they say that their 511
controller will operate in zero1 mode and DCC but it has to be one or
the other no both
At the moment I can double-head & bank or control 3 or 4 locos at once
useing my 3 slave units
to do this with DCC would need 511 master extra power boosters and
slave units as I understand it plus all the hornby decoders changed
am I missing something or is this correct?
cheers clive larby

Re: Hornby zero1 & DCC

Mark Gurries
 

I have operated my large layout by zero 1 for years with no problems
and underestand that it operates by a analog signal transported on a
20volt dc supply to the track which is now obsolete. and IS NOT DCC.

To change over would cost over £1000 with ZTC they say that their 511
controller will operate in zero1 mode and DCC but it has to be one or
the other no both
At the moment I can double-head & bank or control 3 or 4 locos at once
useing my 3 slave units
to do this with DCC would need 511 master extra power boosters and
slave units as I understand it plus all the hornby decoders changed
am I missing something or is this correct?
cheers clive larby
I am not familiar with Hornby Zero system and their exact terminology.

In DCC:

Decoder: A circuit board that is installed in a engine/loco that drive
a motor and control light functions. More advance versions have sound.
Typically the size of a standard decoder varies with the power rating of
the decoder. Decoders with current rating up to 4 amps each are
available.

Booster: The number of power boosters needed for DCC will depend on the
number of loco's ACTIVLY RUNNING at the same time and how much current
each one draws. If a locomotive is stopped and sitting on a track, it
does not draw any power worth worry about. Boosters up to 10Amps are
available. Typical version are about 5 amps.

Power Districts: A section of track or tracks with it own circuit
breaker protection. A short in a one power district will NOT shut down
any other power districts. Today there are "DCC circuit breaker"
products that will allow one to share a single booster covering multiple
power districts at the same time. It is much more cost effective than
buying a booster for each power district. Lots of unused power and
very expensive.

DCC does not have any concepts of slave. Decoders are small enough to
fit down to Z scale. The point is that a DCC decoders should fit
directly into each locomotive eliminating the need for slave
locomotives. I suspect that DCC decoders are much smaller than you
hornby zero 1 decoders.

So to properly size you power needs, one needs to consider

1) Number or actively rolling locomotives on the layout at the same
time. Locomotive that are stopped on the tracks do not consume power of
any consequence. Be realistic about this.

2) The typical (not peak) motor current rating of the locomotive. You
can measure this by measuring the locomotive DC current at full speed
with the wheels spinning on the track. Hold the loco by it coupler when
you do this. Total all the current and divide by the number of loco you
measured. This will be your average current per loco.

3) The number of power districts you need to allow smooth operation
tolerant of a short circuit due to derailment. Think geographically or
activity level wise such as a yard or staging track area. Each major
yard should be its own power district seperate from the main line. If
you have lots of main line or double track, maybe it should be broken up
into small districts too.

Multiply Item #1 by Item #2 and that is the minimum current you need to
run the entire layout. Take that number and divide it by the booster
current rating and round up to a whole number. That is the number of
boosters you need.

Divide the layout into zones such that there will be a typically an even
number of trains in each zone at any given time. Assign a booster to
cover each zone and then divide the zone up into power districts using
DCC circuit breakers as required.

Note: If you have lighted passenger cars, they can easily consume as
much as or more current than a locomotive. You must factor that into
you power calculation for boosters and zones.

For more information about wiring and more, consult the wiring for DCC
website.




Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Linear Technology
Power Supply & Battery Charger Applications Engineer/Manager
---------------------------------------------------------
Model Railroad Club and NMRA DCC presentations are at:
http://www.siliconvalleylines.com/index.html
--------------------------------------------------------
Audio Enthusiast (Love SAE equipment)
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/gurriesm/
----------------------------------------------------------

Re: DCC installs in brass steam?

Dale Gloer
 

I have done several brass steam engines. Either they were manufactured
with can motors or had been retrofitted with can motors. In each of
them it was only necessary to unsoldered a wire from the frame to
isolate the motor. One motor conversion I did myself and I don't
remember how the motor was connected to the frame for sure but I think
it was a fairly simple change to isolate the connection. I guess with
open frame motors you have to examine each one individually.

Actually converting to a can motor was not to hard and the improvement
in operation was worth the cost and effort.

Dale.



--- In WiringForDCC@..., "brian1961go" <brian1961go@y...>
wrote:
I have learned that is fairly difficult and/or expensive to install
decoders into brass due to isolating the frame. Does anyone have
any
suggestions?

My one thought is to have stock car with several different sound
decoders based on engine type and always have it hooked to the
tender
but how do I wire it with just one speaker?

TIA, Brian

Telephone throttles

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

Has anyone on this list had experience using the Lenz interface and
wireless phones for throttles?

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

peco electrofrog crossing

dale_churchill <seatta@...>
 

I recently purchased a psrev to go along with my digitrax zephyr and
I have aquestion.I will have a peco electrofrog crossing on my simple
layout. how do I connect my psrev when their is 4 wires coming from
the electrofrog crossing and only 2 from the psrev. Refer to model
railroader April 2005 page 92 Thank for your help. Dale

Re: DIGITRAX TRANSPONDING/DETECTION

wire4dcc <antijunk@...>
 

Mike,

Sorry, it doesn't appear that any of us have tried transponding. I
think transponding is neat, but it still isn't in my budget.

Try giving Digitrax a call.

Allan

Re: DIGITRAX TRANSPONDING/DETECTION

mmogen2004
 

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "wire4dcc" <antijunk@c...>
wrote:
Mike,

Sorry, it doesn't appear that any of us have tried transponding.
I
think transponding is neat, but it still isn't in my budget.

Try giving Digitrax a call.

Allan
Allan,

It seems that more people use the detection features of the BDL162
rather than combined with transponding and that works fine.
Even Loy Spurlock passed and said to call Digitrax.
It seems that there is only one guy there that knows transponding
and he's always on the phone however I did talk to one of the tech
minions who had no answers to my specific questions and only said to
check my wiring.
Needless to say, that I'm very disillusioned with Digitrax's tech
responses. Example: My DCS100 gives off 9 beeps when I power up.
That many beeps isn't in their beep list so I inquired via email;
Response by nameless person: It's just waking up grumpy.
So far, most of their stuff works but if it doesn't, a person is
just up the creek.

Since transponding isn't in your budget, wanna try your hand at it?
I'll send the whole kit and caboodle to you and see if you can make
it work.
Is your address on your website?
It'll be on its way tomorow via Fedex.

Mike
Mike

Re: DIGITRAX TRANSPONDING/DETECTION

wire4dcc_admin@...
 

Mike,

Since my response to your offer isn't a forum topic, I took this off-line.

I've always wanted transponding, but now that it is here, it is cost prohibitive for me. It's not that I think Digitrax's prices are unreasonable. It's just that I need so many transponders and so many transponder detectors, that it adds up to a pile of money.

Ordinarily, I would jump at your offer. However, in 3 weeks I start another year of law school. I'd be fooling both of us if I thought I'd have the time to get to it before Christmas. And maybe not even then.

Digitrax's tech support may not be ideal, but it is better than most. At least you aren't talking to someone in India! Ask to talk to AJ if you have to. You may not be able to talk to him right then and there, but he'll call you back in a few days - at least he used to. I haven't needed to talk to him in a few years. If you leave a message for AJ, make sure you say that you are not getting adequate help from his tech support. He used to care that his tech support was good. So I think a statement like that would get his attention.

-------------- Original message --------------

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "wire4dcc"
wrote:
Mike,

Sorry, it doesn't appear that any of us have tried transponding.
I
think transponding is neat, but it still isn't in my budget.

Try giving Digitrax a call.

Allan
Allan,

It seems that more people use the detection features of the BDL162
rather than combined with transponding and that works fine.
Even Loy Spurlock passed and said to call Digitrax.
It seems that there is only one guy there that knows transponding
and he's always on the phone however I did talk to one of the tech
minions who had no answers to my specific questions and only said to
check my wiring.
Needless to say, that I'm very disillusioned with Digitrax's tech
responses. Example: My DCS100 gives off 9 beeps when I power up.
That many beeps isn't in their beep list so I inquired via email;
Response by nameless person: It's just waking up grumpy.
So far, most of their stuff works but if it doesn't, a person is
just up the creek.

Since transponding isn't in your budget, wanna try your hand at it?
I'll send the whole kit and caboodle to you and see if you can make
it work.
Is your address on your website?
It'll be on its way tomorow via Fedex.

Mike
Mike





http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: Automatic Train Control

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Mike,

I'm not sure what you are suggesting. DCC is a form of AC. No
simple hardware solution exists for auto reversing a DCC locomotive.

I had a DC locomotive running around the top of my office cubical.
I used a timer and a relay to reverse the polarity of the track to
shuttle the locomotive back and forth. I used diodes at the ends of
the track that stopped the DC locomotive until the timer reversed
the polarity through the relay.

Allan




--- In WiringForDCC@..., "hinman_michael"
<hinman_michael@y...> wrote:
--- In WiringForDCC@..., "Jan Frelin"
<jan.frelin@l...>
wrote:
Friends,

My club has a requirement for a tram that just goes back and
forth
between it's terminal track and staging/storage.
Jan,

I have an Idea to share, but first I would like to stress that I
am
an amateur and no portion of what follows has been tested. The
only
hardware involved is an auto-reverser. Basically you create two
insulated track sections connected to your existing track. The
middle section is connected to the autoreverse and is the route
traveled by your tram. The outer portions( an end peice and the
connection to your layout) are connected to your DCC but wired for
opposite polarity. A DC engine placed in the middle section will
travel to each insulated joint where it will trigger the AR. A DC
engine will only do this facing one direction so you may have to
change polarity of the whole she-bang if you want the loco facing
a
particular way. When the tram reverses it will be abrupt and the
track will be @12vdc all the time so it will basically be running
full throttle. This whole set up would theoretically work with a
DCC
loco, then you would have speed control, but... I have no idea how
decoders react to having their polarity abruptly changed.

Hopefully I have clearly conveyed the concept. I'd like to hear
form the voice of experience on this as I plan to incorporate it
into my layout in the next few months.

good luck,
mike

Decoder for the Bachmann Gas Mechanical Loco

rustierail <rickanmary@...>
 

Confused?

I purchased the Bachmann On30 0-4-0 Side Rod Gas Mechanical Loco. THe
unit is DCC ready the plug on the PC board has 8 female plugs in a
row.

All the male sockets I have found (and used in other units) have the
8 male plugs but in two rows of 4 and 4.

I contacted techsupport at digitrax and sent the PC board diagram and
they recommended DH163PS or DZ143PS. But looking on the digitax web
page and the pictures showed the 4 on 4 plug.

Or do they expect you to solder the wires to the feamle plugs on the
PC board. Has anyone connected on of these units before?

Confussed any suggestions.

Thanks for any help

PECO c55 turnouts are *not* easily modified to work with DCC!

Kay <kaysievert@...>
 

Ok, here's a picture of a Peco c55 #4 turnout:

http://nscalers.com/images/pecoc55.jpg

As you can see, it does not have jumpers that can be cut to insulate
and power route the frog. Although I like Allan Gartner's DDC prep
site, he referred to Peco 55 as being easily modified by cutting
jumpers, which is clearly not the case.
Since I'm not planning on ripping this or any future Peco TO's apart
to make them DCC friendly, I'm stuck.

Lord help me..