Date   
Re: The Most Aggravating Layout

Blair & Rasa
 

With my P2K GP7 units, this is indicative not of DCC problems, but of split
gears. Check some of the other lists (RPM-forum, Proto2000, etc.) for
running commentaries. It seems the consensus is that the axle gears need to
be replaced with an Athearn equivalent. The part number is listed in some
of those threads. If you have problems finding same, report back to me and
I'll search for those emails tonight.

Second possibility - my opinion to date is that DCC is more dirt-on-wheels
sensitive than DC was, so you may need to spend a few minutes cleaning
wheels and track.

Blair Smith.

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of hazel6ton
Sent: May 4, 2005 22:46
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] The Most Aggravating Layout


I have a 4 by 8 layout which I recently converted to DCC. I am using a
Digitrax Zephyr System. It initially ran well at first, but then I
started getting sporadic response in my engines. I especially get this
sporadic response around 18" radius turns and in my turnouts.

My layout consists of an outside oval mainline interconnected to an
inside oval at several locations by turnouts.

I am running two Proto 2000 engines. GP7 equipped with a Soundtraxx
decoder. Also a Alco S-1 with a Digitrax decoder.

What is uncanny about all this is my engines ran well then just
started to barely respond to DCC.

My analog engine runs better than my decoder engines.

Can anyone shed light on this problem?




http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

CONCOR N SCALE MP15

mmogen2004
 

I put a DZ143 into the 1st MP15 I got and get 'NO PG' on every CV I
try to read.
I have a Chief, DT400, and seperate program track.
The loco runs on default address and the lights function normally.
I can program a different 2 digit address into it - again no read
back - and it performs OK.
Cannot program a 4 digit address tho.

Took the 2nd loco motor and hooked it up to decoder and program
track with the same results on another DZ143, Lenz 0511 and TCS M1.
Took an Atlas motor and hooked it up and can read all CV's.
This MP15 motor has no visible brushes, just wires going into the
motor similar to the 12v motors on some toy cars.

Read ohms on the Atlas motor = 159
Read ohms on the MP15 motor = 69

Apparently the decoder can't 'see' a motor, thus no feedback on CV's.

My question: If the decoder is set to see a certain amount of
resistance (which appears to be the case from my test) and this
value is too low, can it be changed in the decoder?
If not, what is the solution to feed back?
I've run the scenario by Digitrax also.

Only thing I could figure, is to hook up an Atlas (or Kato) motor to
decoder and to program track and program the decoder with the 4
digit address I want and then install it in the MP15 which I'll try
next.

Any electronical wizard thoughts?

Mike

Re: Difficulting reading back CV's in N-scale locomotives

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Mike,

You asked some very good questions. I'm curious as to what Digitrax
told you. They should have answered your questions.

Your problem is reading back the CVs that you are programming in
your N-scale locomotives.

You were wondering if there was something that could be changed so
that a decoder could see a motor and read back the CV. Actually,
the process doesn't exactly work that way.

The decoder doesn't see the motor. When a decoder receives a
programming signal or a request to read a CV, ALL the decoder does
is briefly apply power to the motor to acknowledge that it has
received a request from the command station. The motor acts as a
load and draws current. That's all the decoder does. So there is
nothing to change in your decoder.

Your programming station, such as a Chief, sees the surge in current
drawn and reads that as an acknowledgement by the decoder. If the
Chief is programming, it displays 'Good.'

When trying to read back a CV, the Chief sequentally sends the
decoder every possible value for a given CV. When the Chief sends,
and the decoder receives, a value equal to that of a particular CV,
the decoder again briefly puts power to the motor to acknowledge
this particular value. In this way the command station figures out
what value is in the CV. Note that the decoder has no way to send
the value of the CV. The command station has to "guess" it.

It is not essential that an acknowledgement pulse be received by the
command station for a CV to be programmed. I frequently program
decoders before I put them in locomotives without a motor attached.
I get noPG indicating that the command station did not receive the
acknowledgment pulse. But the CV is programmed nonetheless.

So how come you can't program a long address? A long address is
programmed in two CV's - 17 & 18. The command station is probably
programming one of them and then looking for the acknowledgement
pulse. It never programs the second CV because the command station
didn't receive the acknowledgement. You can get around this by
programming CV 17 and 18 individually. You will need to figure out
what values need to go into them manually. With the original
Digitrax throttles, this is what you did, so they had how to figure
these values in their manuals. I don't know if they still do.
Don't forget, when programming a long address, you will also need to
program CV 29 for long addresses. The new Digitrax DT400, and I
believe DT300, throttles make programming CV 29 easy for you. Or
again, you can do them manually.

The above is how to program a CV without getting an
acknowledgement. So what can you do to get the acknowledgement?
Usually the motor will do the track. I admit I don't have
experience on N and Z scale locomotives. I suggest that you program
the decoder prior to placing it in the locomotive if you can. Use a
20 ohm, 2 watt resistor for the motor. Use the resistor only for
programming. If you try to "run" the decoder using the resistor as
a motor, you may smoke the resistor. (You don't actually need to
use a 2 W resistor for programming. The 2 W is only in case you
apply power and forget you have the resistor as a motor. It will
start to smoke, but you probably won't destroy it before you can
power down.)

I suppose it would be difficult to test some drop in decoders in N &
Z or connect a resistor to them temporarily.

The final choice is to change the sensitivity of the command station
to the acknowledgement pulse. I don't know exactly how to do this,
but I suspect it is just a resistor change. If you contact
Digitrax, they may be able to tell you how to do it or have you send
back your command station so that they may make the change for you.

I hope this gives you some insight into the reading CVs and
programming decoders

Re: Difficulting reading back CV's in N-scale locomotives

mmogen2004
 

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "wirefordcc"
<wire4dcc_admin@c...> wrote:
Mike,

You asked some very good questions. I'm curious as to what
Digitrax
told you. They should have answered your questions.
This was Digitrax's answer:

To program, the decoder must see a load on the motor outputs.
We are not aware of the programming problem with this particular
motor with the DZ143.
That the decoder programs with another type motor proves that the
decoder is OK.
You might add an additional resistor across the motor leads to
increase the load and lave it in place for future programming
changes or remove after programming.

Hope this helps


Your problem is reading back the CVs that you are programming in
your N-scale locomotives.

You were wondering if there was something that could be changed so
that a decoder could see a motor and read back the CV. Actually,
the process doesn't exactly work that way.

The decoder doesn't see the motor. When a decoder receives a
programming signal or a request to read a CV, ALL the decoder does
is briefly apply power to the motor to acknowledge that it has
received a request from the command station. The motor acts as a
load and draws current. That's all the decoder does. So there is
nothing to change in your decoder.

Your programming station, such as a Chief, sees the surge in
current
drawn and reads that as an acknowledgement by the decoder. If the
Chief is programming, it displays 'Good.'

When trying to read back a CV, the Chief sequentally sends the
decoder every possible value for a given CV. When the Chief
sends,
and the decoder receives, a value equal to that of a particular
CV,
the decoder again briefly puts power to the motor to acknowledge
this particular value. In this way the command station figures
out
what value is in the CV. Note that the decoder has no way to send
the value of the CV. The command station has to "guess" it.

It is not essential that an acknowledgement pulse be received by
the
command station for a CV to be programmed. I frequently program
decoders before I put them in locomotives without a motor
attached.
I get noPG indicating that the command station did not receive the
acknowledgment pulse. But the CV is programmed nonetheless.

So how come you can't program a long address? A long address is
programmed in two CV's - 17 & 18. The command station is probably
programming one of them and then looking for the acknowledgement
pulse. It never programs the second CV because the command
station
didn't receive the acknowledgement. You can get around this by
programming CV 17 and 18 individually. You will need to figure
out
what values need to go into them manually. With the original
Digitrax throttles, this is what you did, so they had how to
figure
these values in their manuals. I don't know if they still do.
Don't forget, when programming a long address, you will also need
to
program CV 29 for long addresses. The new Digitrax DT400, and I
believe DT300, throttles make programming CV 29 easy for you. Or
again, you can do them manually.

The above is how to program a CV without getting an
acknowledgement. So what can you do to get the acknowledgement?
Usually the motor will do the track. I admit I don't have
experience on N and Z scale locomotives. I suggest that you
program
the decoder prior to placing it in the locomotive if you can. Use
a
20 ohm, 2 watt resistor for the motor. Use the resistor only for
programming. If you try to "run" the decoder using the resistor
as
a motor, you may smoke the resistor. (You don't actually need to
use a 2 W resistor for programming. The 2 W is only in case you
apply power and forget you have the resistor as a motor. It will
start to smoke, but you probably won't destroy it before you can
power down.)

I suppose it would be difficult to test some drop in decoders in N
&
Z or connect a resistor to them temporarily.

The final choice is to change the sensitivity of the command
station
to the acknowledgement pulse. I don't know exactly how to do
this,
but I suspect it is just a resistor change. If you contact
Digitrax, they may be able to tell you how to do it or have you
send
back your command station so that they may make the change for you.

I hope this gives you some insight into the reading CVs and
programming decoders
Thanks for the info. I knew something had to get feedback from the
motor load in order to enable readback.
I'll try putting a 4 digit address in the 1st loco which is all
together now.
The other loco is still waiting for the decoder to be installed and
I have programmed the decoder with using a resistor as you suggested.

Re: Difficulting reading back CV's in N-scale locomotives

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

They didn't say a whole lot, did they?

Their phrase "the decoder must see a load" is partially correct.
Since the decoder is connected to the motor, you can say that the
decoder sees the motor. But the decoder doesn't do anything with
this. It merely causes a load to be seen by your command station.
Your command station is what registers the presence of the motor.

I do agree that if the decoder works with another motor, the decoder
is working correctly.

Their advice about connecting a resistor across the motor is also
valid. It would have been nice if they suggested a value. I'd
start with 100 ohms and work down to say 20 ohms if need be. Since
you are talking N-scale, you probably don't have room inside the
locomotive to leave the resistor. Use AT LEAST 1/2W resistor.
Don't leave it attached, it will smoke.

There was something else I intended to say earlier, but forgot.
There are only 2 sets of CVs you need to program in the program
mode. 1. The address CVs (either CV 01 for short addresses or CV 17
& 18 for long addresses) and 2. the configuration CV 29. Everything
else you can program on the main in Ops mode, which does not try to
read back CVs. You won't be able to read CVs back in Ops mode, but
you also won't get noPG or noID in this mode.

Allan

Mike,

You asked some very good questions. I'm curious as to what
Digitrax
told you. They should have answered your questions.
This was Digitrax's answer:

To program, the decoder must see a load on the motor outputs.
We are not aware of the programming problem with this particular
motor with the DZ143.
That the decoder programs with another type motor proves that the
decoder is OK.
You might add an additional resistor across the motor leads to
increase the load and lave it in place for future programming
changes or remove after programming.

Hope this helps

Re: Readback CV's

mmogen2004
 

Allan,

The thing that got me was:

When I hooked up the decoder and MP15 motor to the program track and
also the Atlas motor, pressed DISP to read the default address, both
motors turned but only the Atlas motor gave a readback for the address.
So, I programmed the decoder with the Atlas motor. No problem.

The advice to put a resistor across the motor won't work in the loco
because there is no room even to put it in temporarily. The motor
leads are buried in the frame and inaccessable so that the wiring has
to be done to the motor and then the motor put in the frame.

At any rate, since both motors turned, that's what lead me to measure
resistance on the motors with the MP15 motor measurimg a lot less, so
my thought that it didn't have enough resistance to be read and give
readback.

Sure would like to know how many ohms the command station needs to
read to give readback but it's not important since another way to
program the decoder is available.

Mike

Re: Readback CV's

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Mike,

You have more good questions. Good!

I was afraid you would have no way to put a resistor in your N-scale
loco.

As far as what resistance the command station needs to see, the
lower the motor's resistance the better. Now, I am pretty sure that
you said the programming worked with the motor that had the higher
resistance. Don't panic. Measuring a motor's resistance is
actually a poor way to determine how much current the motor will
draw while running. How much current a motor will draw is based on
it's running REACTANCE. It is possible that your motor with the
lower resistance has a higher reactance than the other motor. So
don't waste your time measuring a motor's resistance.

As I see it, you have three choices:

1. Check with Digitrax and ask them if there is a way to increase
the sensitivity of the command station to a decoder's
acknowledgement pulse.

2. Program the decoder without being able to read the CVs as I
indicated in an earlier portion of this thread.

3. Program the docoder using a different motor or a resistor.

Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector and Switches

bobprond
 

I have never used a block occupancy detector before and therefore
ignorant in its operation. I have a reverse loop working well
using a Lenz LK100 Reverse Loop Module. I now want to integrate
occupancy detectors within that loop to switch the Y-turnout
controlling the loop (See Case 1 & 2).

Is it possible, WITHOUT USING SOFTWARE, to toggle a switch
automatically using a Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector. Is there any
other item I would need to make this happen? Would Atlas Snap
switches be of any help? How would this be wired?

Reverse Loop Case 1 (Two Sections):

Is there anyway to automatically toggle a Y-switch in a reverse loop
depending upon whether a train is located within one half of the
loop or the other. I have a reverse loop using a Y-switch. The
loop itself is divided into 2 equal 80 in. sections connected with
insulated joiners. I am not planning to run trains on the loop > 60
in. I can put a Lenz Occupancy Detector on my power drops on
each of the two 80 in. loop sections. When a train enters the loop
in one 80 in. section and crosses over to the other 80 in. section I
would like to I would like to automatically toggle the Y-switch to
the opposite position, therefore having the train exit the reverse
loop
without manual intervention. Can this be done?

Reverse Loop Case 2 (Three Sections):

I have an 170 in. reverse loop divided into three sections. The two
sections entering/exiting are each 80 in. long (section A & B).
These two sections and the farthest point in the loop are connected
to a 10 in. piece of track (section C) using insulated joiners. I
have power drops in all three sections. If I put the Lenz Occupancy
Detector in section C, can I automatically toggle the Y-switch to
its opposite direction. I am not going to be running any trains
through this reverse loop > 60 in. Ultimately, I want to have a
train
enter a Reverse Loop, in section A or B, passover section C which
has the Occupancy Detector which then toggles my Y-switch
allowing exit of the loop without any human intervention. Is this
possible?


Equipment I have:

Lenz LK100 Reverse Loop Module
Lenz LB101 Occupany Detector
Lenz LR101 Feedback Module

Allan Gartner Web Page?

bobprond
 

I found a reference to "Allan Gartner Web Page" on the old user forum
site. Does this web page still exist and if so what is its address.

The reference was in the topic:

Peco Code 55 Double CrossOver Electrofrog

One of the answers had the following reference.

"Allan Gartner shows a diagram and how to modify Peco Electrofrog
Switches in the "turnout' section of his web pages."

Re: Allan Gartner Web Page?

Todd Schacherl <todds@...>
 

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On
Behalf Of bobprond
Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 9:23 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Allan Gartner Web Page?


I found a reference to "Allan Gartner Web Page" on the old user forum
site. Does this web page still exist and if so what is its address.

The reference was in the topic:

Peco Code 55 Double CrossOver Electrofrog

One of the answers had the following reference.

"Allan Gartner shows a diagram and how to modify Peco Electrofrog
Switches in the "turnout' section of his web pages."




http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector and Switches

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Yes...But you don't really need those occupancy detectors to control the turnout. All you need is an isulated balloon track loop, an auto-reverser, and a short constant polarity track length approaching the frog ends of the switch. (Somewhat equivalent to your Case 2 but shorter sections for A & B, and greater-than-train length for the actual reversing loop C.) Now see http://www.wiringfordcc.com/signaling.htm. Look at the dwg for signaling the polarity status of a Reversing track section with a 3-wire bi-color LED. It works by detecting which rail is at the correct polarity for a Green signal. Now in your mind replace ONE of the LEDs with a DC relay coil, where the contacts of said relay control the switch machine. A train enters the loop (section A) in the direction last established...Assume that the polarity of reversing track (C) will be correct. Nothing will change until the train nears the exit end of the loop and crosses the gaps between C and B. At that point the A-R unit sees a polarity mis-match and flips the polarity of track C. This act (and the steering diode) energizes (or de-energizes) the relay coil. Relay contacts change connections to the Tortoise (or other) switch machine and correct turnout position for exit.

Constant polarity Entry-Exit tracks (your A & B) need to be only long enough for the switch machine to throw the turnout before the train reaches the point rails (or energized frog).

Add a free-wheeling diode across the relay coil. When energized, the relay coil will see 1/2 the DCC track voltage and be constanly ON. For HO scale use a 5Vdc relay with resistor in series (like the LED circuit) to adjust coil voltage and prevent overheating. resistor value will be relay choice dependant.

The LK100 (and some other auto-reversers) does draw a noticable amount of current. So will the added relay coil. If wish to use an occupancy detector be sure to place it directly on wires going to the track so that it does not see current consumed by the LK100 or the turnout control relay.

Too complicated? I can send you a diagram if you need it.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of bobprond
Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 10:49 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector and Switches


I have never used a block occupancy detector before and therefore
ignorant in its operation. I have a reverse loop working well
using a Lenz LK100 Reverse Loop Module. I now want to integrate
occupancy detectors within that loop to switch the Y-turnout
controlling the loop (See Case 1 & 2).

Is it possible, WITHOUT USING SOFTWARE, to toggle a switch
automatically using a Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector. Is there any
other item I would need to make this happen? Would Atlas Snap
switches be of any help? How would this be wired?

Reverse Loop Case 1 (Two Sections):

Is there anyway to automatically toggle a Y-switch in a reverse loop
depending upon whether a train is located within one half of the
loop or the other. I have a reverse loop using a Y-switch. The
loop itself is divided into 2 equal 80 in. sections connected with
insulated joiners. I am not planning to run trains on the loop > 60
in. I can put a Lenz Occupancy Detector on my power drops on
each of the two 80 in. loop sections. When a train enters the loop
in one 80 in. section and crosses over to the other 80 in. section I
would like to I would like to automatically toggle the Y-switch to
the opposite position, therefore having the train exit the reverse
loop
without manual intervention. Can this be done?

Reverse Loop Case 2 (Three Sections):

I have an 170 in. reverse loop divided into three sections. The two
sections entering/exiting are each 80 in. long (section A & B).
These two sections and the farthest point in the loop are connected
to a 10 in. piece of track (section C) using insulated joiners. I
have power drops in all three sections. If I put the Lenz Occupancy
Detector in section C, can I automatically toggle the Y-switch to
its opposite direction. I am not going to be running any trains
through this reverse loop > 60 in. Ultimately, I want to have a
train
enter a Reverse Loop, in section A or B, passover section C which
has the Occupancy Detector which then toggles my Y-switch
allowing exit of the loop without any human intervention. Is this
possible?


Equipment I have:

Lenz LK100 Reverse Loop Module
Lenz LB101 Occupany Detector
Lenz LR101 Feedback Module





http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector and Switches

Robert Prondzinski <bobprond@...>
 

Thank you very much for responding. You have been the only one that has answered my query. I am very light in my understanding of electronics, what I do have some basic understanding. I would appreciate it if you would send me a diagram.
I thought as new DCC user that the situation I posed was relatively common for people to want to do. Unfortunately I have just got started with understanding one occupancy detectors can and cannot do. Thank you again

----- Original Message -----
From: Vollrath, Don
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 18, 2005 9:39 AM
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector and Switches


Yes...But you don't really need those occupancy detectors to control the turnout. All you need is an isulated balloon track loop, an auto-reverser, and a short constant polarity track length approaching the frog ends of the switch. (Somewhat equivalent to your Case 2 but shorter sections for A & B, and greater-than-train length for the actual reversing loop C.) Now see http://www.wiringfordcc.com/signaling.htm. Look at the dwg for signaling the polarity status of a Reversing track section with a 3-wire bi-color LED. It works by detecting which rail is at the correct polarity for a Green signal. Now in your mind replace ONE of the LEDs with a DC relay coil, where the contacts of said relay control the switch machine. A train enters the loop (section A) in the direction last established...Assume that the polarity of reversing track (C) will be correct. Nothing will change until the train nears the exit end of the loop and crosses the gaps between C and B. At that point the A-R unit sees a polarity mis-match and flips the polarity of track C. This act (and the steering diode) energizes (or de-energizes) the relay coil. Relay contacts change connections to the Tortoise (or other) switch machine and correct turnout position for exit.

Constant polarity Entry-Exit tracks (your A & B) need to be only long enough for the switch machine to throw the turnout before the train reaches the point rails (or energized frog).

Add a free-wheeling diode across the relay coil. When energized, the relay coil will see 1/2 the DCC track voltage and be constanly ON. For HO scale use a 5Vdc relay with resistor in series (like the LED circuit) to adjust coil voltage and prevent overheating. resistor value will be relay choice dependant.

The LK100 (and some other auto-reversers) does draw a noticable amount of current. So will the added relay coil. If wish to use an occupancy detector be sure to place it directly on wires going to the track so that it does not see current consumed by the LK100 or the turnout control relay.

Too complicated? I can send you a diagram if you need it.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@...
[mailto:WiringForDCC@...]On Behalf Of bobprond
Sent: Tuesday, May 17, 2005 10:49 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector and Switches


I have never used a block occupancy detector before and therefore
ignorant in its operation. I have a reverse loop working well
using a Lenz LK100 Reverse Loop Module. I now want to integrate
occupancy detectors within that loop to switch the Y-turnout
controlling the loop (See Case 1 & 2).

Is it possible, WITHOUT USING SOFTWARE, to toggle a switch
automatically using a Lenz LB101 Occupancy Detector. Is there any
other item I would need to make this happen? Would Atlas Snap
switches be of any help? How would this be wired?

Reverse Loop Case 1 (Two Sections):

Is there anyway to automatically toggle a Y-switch in a reverse loop
depending upon whether a train is located within one half of the
loop or the other. I have a reverse loop using a Y-switch. The
loop itself is divided into 2 equal 80 in. sections connected with
insulated joiners. I am not planning to run trains on the loop > 60
in. I can put a Lenz Occupancy Detector on my power drops on
each of the two 80 in. loop sections. When a train enters the loop
in one 80 in. section and crosses over to the other 80 in. section I
would like to I would like to automatically toggle the Y-switch to
the opposite position, therefore having the train exit the reverse
loop
without manual intervention. Can this be done?

Reverse Loop Case 2 (Three Sections):

I have an 170 in. reverse loop divided into three sections. The two
sections entering/exiting are each 80 in. long (section A & B).
These two sections and the farthest point in the loop are connected
to a 10 in. piece of track (section C) using insulated joiners. I
have power drops in all three sections. If I put the Lenz Occupancy
Detector in section C, can I automatically toggle the Y-switch to
its opposite direction. I am not going to be running any trains
through this reverse loop > 60 in. Ultimately, I want to have a
train
enter a Reverse Loop, in section A or B, passover section C which
has the Occupancy Detector which then toggles my Y-switch
allowing exit of the loop without any human intervention. Is this
possible?


Equipment I have:

Lenz LK100 Reverse Loop Module
Lenz LB101 Occupany Detector
Lenz LR101 Feedback Module





http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links








http://www.WiringForDCC.com



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Message Response Time

Don Vollrath <dvollrath@...>
 

To those of you who ask all those good questions...
You must realize that the WWW is indeed World Wide and that
participants to this forum live all over the Globe. Many of us also
have other things we must do besides model railroading [...Like
work :-( ] We are not always on-line waiting for the next message.
And sometimes it does require some thinking time to compose a
carefully thought out answer. So when you ask a question don't be
dissapointed if you do not recieve an immediate reply. Come back in a
couple of days and you may find several good responses.
DonV

New file uploaded to WiringForDCC

WiringForDCC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the WiringForDCC
group.

File : /RevLoop1.doc
Uploaded by : donevol <dvollrath@...>
Description : Here's a way to use a DCC Auto-Reverser to control the polarity of a simple reversing loop AND the entry/exit turnout.

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WiringForDCC/files/RevLoop1.doc

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/help/us/groups/files

Regards,

donevol <dvollrath@...>

Re: Automatic Balloon Track Control

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Don Vollrath has uploaded his circuit to this forum for using a DCC
auto-reverser to control the throat turnout of a balloon track. Don's
circuit has also been immortalized on the Wiring For DCC website at:

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/sw_ctl.htm#a16

Thank you, Don, for your contribution.

Allan

?Wiring to throw a turnout if train is comming against points

steve <snorring@...>
 

I recently read a review of the HARE, (Stationary decoder for
Tortoise) that has a feature i want.

The decoder senses the train aproaching the turnout and throws the
turnout if the engine is comming at the points the wrong way, thus
avoiding potential de-railments.

I don't want to replace my decoders, but would like some suggestions
on how to wire this option. Does anyone have an idea and schematic.

I'm a novice when it comes to electronics.

Thanks,
Steve

Re: Decoder Made Just for Tortoise Switch Machines

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

All readers,

DCC Specialties has introduced a great new product. It is a decoder
made just for Tortoise switch machines. Check it out at:
http://www.dccspecialties.com/products/hare.htm

Steve,

I'm not sure I understand your question. You don't need to change the
decoders in your locomotives. You just need to start using the Hare.
Maybe this answers your question.

Are you already using DCC turnout control? Are you wanting to add
this capability to exisiting DCC turnout control?

Are you using toggle switches to control your Tortoises? Are you
wanting to add this capability to your existing toggle switches?

Allan

Re: Decoder Made Just for Tortoise Switch Machines

snorring@...
 

i am using dcc turnout control and would like to add this function. I don't
want to change out all my stationary decoders. Any thoughts?

Digtrax radios

tlweissg <tom.l.weissgerber@...>
 

I have been thinking of purchasing a new DT-4R and radio receiver
for my loconet and would like to hear feedback from those who
already are using them. The reason I ask is, I just had the
opportunity to run Radio's with DT-300's and 4r's. Clearly the DT-
4r's worked much better.

But, not flawless. A few times, I needed to re-plug in to stop my
locomotive from a slow creep or to just re-acquire it. It was like
the base station was not listening until I re-plugged in. Several
others, gave the impression this was quite normal.

Is this normal? Are their things that help reduce the problem? Do
all systems exhibit this issue from time to time?

Regards

Tom Weissgerber
Intel Corporation
Validation Tool Development Manager
916-356-5339

Re: Digtrax radios

Dale Gloer
 

I have only DT100Rs so I can't comment directly but with the DT100R I
have not experienced the problmes you describe. I do have on problem
though related to thelocation of the UR91. If I hold any of my
DT100Rs within about 2 feet of the UR91, I lose control. I believe
this is due to overloading the receiver at such close range and I
intend to move the UR91 location so I can never get that close (it is
in the facia right now). Other than that I operate trouble free.

Dale Gloer


--- In WiringForDCC@..., "tlweissg"
<tom.l.weissgerber@i...> wrote:

I have been thinking of purchasing a new DT-4R and radio receiver
for my loconet and would like to hear feedback from those who
already are using them. The reason I ask is, I just had the
opportunity to run Radio's with DT-300's and 4r's. Clearly the DT-
4r's worked much better.

But, not flawless. A few times, I needed to re-plug in to stop my
locomotive from a slow creep or to just re-acquire it. It was like
the base station was not listening until I re-plugged in. Several
others, gave the impression this was quite normal.

Is this normal? Are their things that help reduce the problem? Do
all systems exhibit this issue from time to time?

Regards

Tom Weissgerber
Intel Corporation
Validation Tool Development Manager
916-356-5339