Date   
Re: Wire Connectors

Gregory Latiak
 

I have almost decided that IDC connectors were the right thing for my Tomar signals. Still might end up using RJ45 punch blocks for the wires themselves -- as in my layout the signals are close to being in pairs. Just push the wires in with my tool, snap in the connector to the control board. 

I have a couple of semaphores from them as well where the connections to the LED are basically magnet wire -- but because of the alignment needs of the servos, I was going to make up a mounting block and solder the wires to a local board with the other servo signals.

greg latiak

Re: Wire Connectors

Glenn
 

When I was working with the enameled wire I wrapped it with "Flex-i grit" sand paper to remove the enamel then wiped the end with real nail polish remover (acetone).

Look up K & S Engineering Flex-I-Grit on ebay. sorry I could not find it otherwise quickly. There is also a K & S Engineering Flex-I-File. Either is a super thin flexible fine grit sandpaper.

It is used by model car builder to smooth fillers.

Glenn


HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Paul Libke
 

This is my first attempt to use this Forum (other than just reading other's comments), so if I make any mistakes in form, please let me know. 


I am just getting back into the railroading hobby after many years of absence.  I have many, many (400-500) freight and passenger cars, some from as long as 60 years ago, through most of the 60s, 70s, 80s era, to a few newer ones, but none brand new (within the last 5-10 years.)  Some of the cars need new trucks anyway because the originals are missing, or other problems.

 

I am building a 10 x 20 railroad which will use DCC by NCE control, and code 83, nickel-silver rail.

 

I want to install a sophisticated signaling system, and plan to use block detectors (probably from JLC Enterprises) that sense current draw through a coil, and possibly the Chubb node modules as well (unless I find something easier, or cheaper, or using LCC.)

 

For block detection, I would like to have every car draw current through at least one axel of each truck.

 

Here’s my dilemma and question:  I need to put new trucks on every car, and I would like to use the least number of different trucks as possible.  I want trucks that offer reliable current conduction, and look reasonably good (I'm not a rivet counter), and have the least tendency to accumulate dirt.  I am overwhelmed by the number of trucks, wheel sets, etc., available for refitting cars.  And many of those available don’t really specify the traits I need.

 

I am looking for advice and recommendations on which trucks would be the most appropriate.

 

Re: Wire Connectors

rmvelten@...
 

Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri

Re: Wire Connectors

Blair & Rasa
 

Rich

I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:

http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B

Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.  I can always make up a worthwhile order.

Blair

 


On 17/02/20 23:50, rmvelten@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri

Re: Wire Connectors

Puckdropper
 

I've used them and they do work well.  I used them on my Aunt's garage door, which is still operating just fine.

If it wasn't for the removable requirement, I'd be looking at using them.  We're going to be pulling a couple of those signals for scenery work.  (I've learned you can "be really careful" for about 2 minutes, then you inevitably forget about the thing and hit it or drip paint or something.  Removing it is the easiest way to prevent damage.)

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <rmvelten@...> wrote :

Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Paul O
 

Paul, you’re looking at a pretty expensive proposition (400-500 cars).

You said: “Here’s my dilemma:  I need to put new trucks on every car, and I would like to use the least number of different trucks as possible.”

Do you really mean ‘trucks’ or do you mean ‘axles’?

 

I’m not aware of any trucks that come with resistor wheels.

If you need to replace broken/missing trucks, you’ll still have to add a conductive (resistor) axle to any new trucks.

 

Two least expensive options, if you can use the existing trucks:

Buy axles that already have the resistor installed,

or,

modify regular metal wheel sets by adding the resistors yourself; you can find how-to videos on-line.

 

Paul O

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Paul Libke
 

Thank you, Paul O. 

 

I see what you mean about being expensive.  Since probably 95% of the truck frames are in good shape, I will look at just replacing the wheel/axel sets, and will look for ones that already have the resistor installed.

Thanks again.

BTW, is this the right way to reply: to the whole group, rather than “to the sender?”

 

Best regards,

 

Paul

Re: Wire Connectors

john
 

Hello,
   I worked for the "Phone Company" for many years and for AT&T for many more. The connectors you are talking of are excellent but they have some problems. There are a number of different connectors and an unusual one allows one to tap and connect to a wire without cutting it. The connectors are available for a number of wire gages. They each accept a range of gages. They connect signal wires very well and current carrying capability is compatible with the wire size of the connector.
   At 10 cents a connector they are reasonably priced but sometimes they are available for less, look around.
   Now the problems. Avoid the filled connectors. The grease will leak, sometimes slowly, sometimes quickly. The grease will attract and collect dirt and dust. Much more dust than you think is around. Another problem is their bulkiness. While they seem tiny they accumulate bulk quickly. Connecting different gage wire will probably be best accomplished by stripping and soldering but the connectors will help with some of it.
   Hope I helped.
john
  


On Tuesday, February 21, 2017 12:40 PM, "puckdropper@... [WiringForDCC]" wrote:




I've used them and they do work well.  I used them on my Aunt's garage door, which is still operating just fine.

If it wasn't for the removable requirement, I'd be looking at using them.  We're going to be pulling a couple of those signals for scenery work.  (I've learned you can "be really careful" for about 2 minutes, then you inevitably forget about the thing and hit it or drip paint or something.  Removing it is the easiest way to prevent damage.)

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., wrote :

Has anyone else ever used the 2, 3 and 4 wire IDC Telephone Data Splice Connectors?  You don't have to strip the wires to use these - merely insert the wires until they stop, then used ordinary pliers to squeeze the button down.  The inside of the connector is filled with silicone.  They are designed for AWG 22 - 26 wire.  I got my first one when the ATT guy left a box after a service call.  They are not removable - you just cut them off and throw away, but you lose about 1/2" of wire trapped in the connector.

I found them on ebay for about $10 for a package of 100 connectors.  Here is an example - I am not associated with this seller in any way:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-Wire-IDC-Telephone-Data-Splice-Connector-100-Pack-/351671261113?hash=item51e13d97b9:g:JzkAAOxyRHdRy6Dk

Rich Velten in Missouri




Re: Wire Connectors

Doug Harris <digbee@...>
 

On 22/02/2017 06:03, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Rich
I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B
Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.
I can always make up a worthwhile order.
Blair

Eclectic, indeed! I've never seen anything like it!


--
Cheers.


Doug Harris
Cambridge, New Zealand

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Doug Harris <digbee@...>
 

On 22/02/2017 08:52, 'Paul Libke' PaulLibke@... [WiringForDCC]
wrote:
*/Thank you, Paul O. /*
*/I see what you mean about being expensive. Since probably 95% of the
truck frames are in good shape, I will look at just replacing the
wheel/axel sets, and will look for ones that already have the resistor
installed./*
BTW, is this the right way to reply: to the whole group, rather than “to
the sender?”/*

Yep. I like to see this advice, too, and I'm sure many othere so also.


Model Railroading IS Fun. (And vee haf vays of making you haff Fun..)


BTW (for by-the-way).. please check your email settings to make sure you
are sending in Plain Text only - I got a lot of unusual symbols and
extra stuff from your reply..


Many Thanks again..


--
Cheers.


Doug Harris
Cambridge, New Zealand

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

wirefordcc
 

You can buy wheels from Signaling Solution with resistors on them.  http://www.wsaeng.com/Signaling_Solution  I don’t know what they charge for them.

 

You can also add resistors to metal wheels with a plastic axle pretty easily by gluing a surface mount resistor to the axle and making the connection with conductive paint.  See my website for more info on block detection and wheel sets.  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/blockdet.htm

 

Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Paul Libke
 

Thank you, Allen.  I will have a look at Signaling Solution and your website.

 

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Puckdropper
 

The link for Signaling Solution didn't work.

Another supplier of resistor equipped wheels is Litchfield Station, http://www.litchfieldstation.net/  They're Intermountain wheels with resistors added, I think they're made by the guys at Litchfield Station.

As for metal wheels, it's hard to beat Intermountain Wheels.  Just buy the big bags and enjoy!  The Litchfield Station ones will match perfectly.

Puckdropper


---In wiringfordcc@..., <bigboy@...> wrote :

You can buy wheels from Signaling Solution with resistors on them.  http://www.wsaeng.com/Signaling_Solution  I don’t know what they charge for them.

 

You can also add resistors to metal wheels with a plastic axle pretty easily by gluing a surface mount resistor to the axle and making the connection with conductive paint.  See my website for more info on block detection and wheel sets.  http://www.wiringfordcc.com/blockdet.htm

 

Allan Gartner

Wiring For DCC

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Paul O
 

Yes, replying to the group is fine. That way anyone following a thread can see the results.

 

Paul O

 

==========================================================

Thank you, Paul O. 

 I see what you mean about being expensive.  Since probably 95% of the truck frames are in good shape, I will look at just replacing the wheel/axel sets, and will look for ones that already have the resistor installed.

Thanks again.

BTW, is this the right way to reply: to the whole group, rather than “to the sender?”

 Best regards,

 Paul

Re: Wire Connectors

Blair & Rasa
 

Doug

Biggest downside is, just about everything comes and goes. Those connectors are one of the few items that they've always had, for the last six years anyway. Couple of times, I've ordered one or two of something that intrigued me, only to decide I wanted more - but they no longer had them, so I had to find them full-retail instead.

Another entertaining one is bgmicro.com, though he doesn't seem to be quite so...adventurous. Great supplies for electronics types, though.

Blair

On 17/02/21 17:05, Doug Harris digbee@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
On 22/02/2017 06:03, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Rich
I've used these before, for indoors and outdoors connections:
http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G17981B
Goldmine always has an entertaining, eclectic variety of surplus stuff.
I can always make up a worthwhile order.
Blair
Eclectic, indeed! I've never seen anything like it!

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Blair & Rasa
 

Puckdropper

When a link doesn't work, just edit it to remove whatever subcategory is in the link. When it didn't work, I just went to www.wsaeng.com - there, they show a product page.

http://www.wsaeng.com/Products.html

Sure enough, on the product page is an Item called DWS - Detectable Wheelsets.

Hope this helps others.

Blair

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

Paul Libke
 

Signaling Solutions is also still available at www.signalingsolution.com

 

It goes to the same pages as www.wsaeng.com/Products.html

 

And thanks for the help.

Re: Wire Connectors

Doug Harris <digbee@...>
 

On 23/02/2017 02:57, Blair & Rasa smithbr@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
Doug
Another entertaining one is bgmicro.com, though he doesn't seem to be
quite so...adventurous. Great supplies for electronics types, though.
Blair

Many Thanks, Blair.


Too many items to look through - a dedicated search is obviously indicated!


--
Cheers.


Doug Harris
Cambridge, New Zealand

Re: HO Scale Trucks Suitable for Current Block Detection

eclipserd
 

Let me throw another idea out to you that you may want to consider.....

I helped a friend of mine install a seven node SMINI CMRI system about six years ago.  At the time he decided to convert over, he was using CVP's Railcommand command control system and since it's primarily a DC system, he just used simple diodes and a transistor for detection.  It was crude, and more importantly, not very sensitive so he didn't have any detected axles as a resistor of relatively low resistance would have been required.  He'd have a lighted caboose, helper engine or something similar for EOT detection but that was it.

To protect an OS or interlocking where a train was likely to be longer than the OS or interlocking block, in addition to the current detection mentioned above, he placed a CDS photo cell detectors in the middle of the switch so that the OS would light up on the old DS CTC panel when a train was covering the photo cell but wasn't activating the current detector..
When we converted over to CMRI, he wanted to get the CMRI in and working before a regional op gathering and this was before he could add resistors to his car axles.  We wired up each OS photo cell detector to a CMRI input in addition to new current detectors of the OSs' to their own inputs and we simply "AND'ed" each of them in software.  We added a little turn-on hysteresis in software for the photo cell detectors near switching areas so a rogue arm or fat-fingered "0-5-0" move wouldn't unnecessarily cause the computer to falsely indicate occupied OS to the dispatcher.

When we finished the CMRI install and the regional op gathering was over, then my friend decided to equip one axle of each car with resistors and when finished, we simply annulled the photo cell detector "AND" logic statements in software and ran with only the current detectors reporting occupancy.  Once we ran a few local, monthly sessions to satisfy ourselves that all cars would adequately detect in each OS using only the current detectors, we then proceeded to remove the photocell detectors and freed up some input real-estate on the CMRI SMINIs.

The reason I bring this up is that photo cell detectors are relatively easy to build and fairly inexpensive if you can DIY the circuit build.  There are commercially available circuits out there as well.  In either case, it would give you "breather" time to obtain proper axles/funds/free time to adequately equip your rolling stock and still have a reasonable stand-in for those areas where your train is longer than a block.  My friend would have liked to have had all of his rolling stock with detected axles at CMRI install time but that just didn't happen and the above mentioned method served us favorably for about year until he had all of the rolling stock with resistor axles.  My favorite go-to resource for electronic "wiz-bangs" is Rob Paisley's site.  Check out these simple optical detectors, if you're interested. http://home.cogeco.ca/~rpaisley4/PhotoDetectors.html

As it's optical detection, it's also "point detection" and it does have it's drawbacks and in our case we had a couple of "oops" moments where a container well car with open braced bottoms would show a clear OS or a coupling would stop right over the photo cell and falsely show unoccupied and a turnout got thrown under a train, but we felt the compromise served us well until we could go solely current-detection.

Hope this gives another bent on the possibilities...

Cheers,

Daland Speirs
SLC, UT