Date   
Re: Remote RRamp-like Indicators

Gregory Latiak
 

Thanks for this. Looks like something within my skills to fabricate.

greg

Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

colinseggie@...
 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Charles Brumbelow
 

Ultimate example???
Cheers! Charles


Repeal the 17th Amendment. 

On Mar 19, 2016, at 6:42 AM, colinseggie@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

john
 

Hi Doc,
   If you are going to have many wires, D rings (Distributing rings) running the longest length, even around corners work. Wiring from devices can be run in smaller rings, bundles or stapled toward the D rings. It is easy to run new wires and trace old wires in rings because the bundle remains loose.
   You will find that commercial rings are expensive but you can buy 1/2 inch by 1/16 aluminum and make your own. Rings can be opened if necessary if you  missed a ring when installing
   Bundling wires serves another purpose by canceling radiation noise which can be a bother with DCC.  Don't run 110v wiring with your low voltage stuff, it is not worth the risk.
   If you have a small layout you can use cable ties that come with mounting holes and tabs to make them reusable. Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.
   You could drill holes in your girders but I find that unforgiving. Seems like I remember a lot of do overs.
Good luck
john


On Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM, "colinseggie@... [WiringForDCC]" wrote:




Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin



Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Tim Johnson
 

I've found Velcro tape to work quite well. I cut short strips, and screw them to the benchwork. It's really easy to bundle the wires with them, and quick and easy to separate them again if you need to work on them.
-- 
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

---In WiringForDCC@..., <john.p.dunn@...> wrote :

Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Mark Gurries
 

When it comes to choosing how to bundle wires together, you do so by first identifying which of TWO GROUPS the layout wires fall into in terms of its function.

1) Power.   Any wire(s) that carry any form of power.   DCC track Power.  DC or AC Accessory Power, track drops, Turnout wiring (Frog, Switch Motor), Occupancy Detection Input (Track side). Structure lighting.


2) Control.  Any wire(s) that carry small control signals or functions.  DCC Cab/Throttle bus,  Signals, Occupancy Detection output (Control side).


It is NEVER MIX 120VAC or House Hold AC power with LAYOUT WIRING of any kind.  Layout wiring is all LOW VOLTAGE.    AC House Power is HIGH VOLTAGE.  The former is safe to touch.  The latter is not.


On Mar 19, 2016, at 9:53 AM, SBB_BLS_Bahnen@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

I've found Velcro tape to work quite well. I cut short strips, and screw them to the benchwork. It's really easy to bundle the wires with them, and quick and easy to separate them again if you need to work on them.
--
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Paul O
 

Doc, lots of long wires neatly bundled together could cause cross-talk;

"spaghetti junction" wiring eliminates that. J

 

Paul O

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Doc Colin <colinseggie@...>
 

Paul , iI thought that "snubber filters " prevented that?
Doc Colin
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 6:33 AM
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

Doc, lots of long wires neatly bundled together could cause cross-talk;

"spaghetti junction" wiring eliminates that. J

Paul O

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Don,

The snubber/filters on the DCC track power bus serve a different purpose. The primary purpose is to absorb and reduce voltage transients on the buss of surges caused by intermittent connections to train wheels and/or short circuits. The inductance of DCC bus wiring (untwisted and length) amplifies those effects.

 

The reason to separate DCC power wiring from wires like the cab bus and other signaling feedback wiring is to reduce the possibility of normal and abnormal DCC switching causing interference with those circuits.

 

 

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 12:14 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 




Paul , iI thought that "snubber filters " prevented that?

Doc Colin

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 6:33 AM

Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

 

Doc, lots of long wires neatly bundled together could cause cross-talk;

"spaghetti junction" wiring eliminates that. J

Paul O

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin




Re: Wiring for A Wye

mikedolan34
 

Hi Don.
Sorry for the delay returning you thoughts on the Wye. 2 legs of the Wye measure 43" and the 3rd leg is 53". They have been working for a couple of years at this length. Trains running on the set up don't tend to be extremely long.
Outside the box question: Could a PM42 be setup to power each leg? If each leg is set as a reversing section on the PM42, would the PM react if the polarity was the same and only react on the leg that is not?
I intend to power the legs from a DB150.
Mike Dolan


From: "Don' dvollrath@... 'Vollrath [WiringForDCC]"
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, February 21, 2016 11:18:30 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Wiring for A Wye

 

Mike
You can use a DPDT toggle switch to select which leg of the wye will be a reversing leg at setup time. Insulate both rails of each leg. Wire the rails of each leg to the 'throw' terminals of a separate DPDT toggle switch. Wire one end of each toggle switch to an AR unit. Wire the other side is the switch to fixed DCC. Flip the toggles to suit the setup. An alternate setup would be to let both legs be of fixed polarity and make the third switch of the wye determine the polarity of the turnout and tracks beyond according to the direction of the throw bar.
DonV


On Feb 21, 2016, at 10:00 PM, pkmjd@... [WiringForDCC] > wrote:

I belong to a Free-Mo Modular group and have a question concerning Wye wiring.
The nature of our group is such that each setup is different from the previous. I have built a Wye for use in the group and wired as it is, requires placement the same at each set up.
I would like to rewire this so that each leg of the wye could be swapped for the purpose of the reversing polarity. I would like to control each leg of the wye so that I could have Leg A as the reversing section at a set up but have Leg C as the reversing section at the next set up.
I've looked at SPST or DPDT toggles or maybe a 3 way Guitar type switch is required. But I'm confused.
Appreciate any feedback.
Mike Dolan
(New Member)


Re: Wiring for A Wye

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Yes. An auto-reverser will be totally happy when the polarity of the track is the same at each end of the sometimes A-R section. Once triggered to the proper polarity, it just stays that way.

DonV  

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 11:34 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Wiring for A Wye

 




Hi Don.

Sorry for the delay returning you thoughts on the Wye. 2 legs of the Wye measure 43" and the 3rd leg is 53". They have been working for a couple of years at this length. Trains running on the set up don't tend to be extremely long.

Outside the box question: Could a PM42 be setup to power each leg? If each leg is set as a reversing section on the PM42, would the PM react if the polarity was the same and only react on the leg that is not?

I intend to power the legs from a DB150.

Mike Dolan


From: "Don' dvollrath@... 'Vollrath [WiringForDCC]" <WiringForDCC@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, February 21, 2016 11:18:30 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Wiring for A Wye

 

 

Mike
You can use a DPDT toggle switch to select which leg of the wye will be a reversing leg at setup time. Insulate both rails of each leg. Wire the rails of each leg to the 'throw' terminals of a separate DPDT toggle switch. Wire one end of each toggle switch to an AR unit. Wire the other side is the switch to fixed DCC. Flip the toggles to suit the setup. An alternate setup would be to let both legs be of fixed polarity and make the third switch of the wye determine the polarity of the turnout and tracks beyond according to the direction of the throw bar.
DonV


On Feb 21, 2016, at 10:00 PM, pkmjd@...<mailto:pkmjd@...> [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...<mailto:WiringForDCC@...>> wrote:

I belong to a Free-Mo Modular group and have a question concerning Wye wiring.
The nature of our group is such that each setup is different from the previous. I have built a Wye for use in the group and wired as it is, requires placement the same at each set up.
I would like to rewire this so that each leg of the wye could be swapped for the purpose of the reversing polarity. I would like to control each leg of the wye so that I could have Leg A as the reversing section at a set up but have Leg C as the reversing section at the next set up.
I've looked at SPST or DPDT toggles or maybe a 3 way Guitar type switch is required. But I'm confused.
Appreciate any feedback.
Mike Dolan
(New Member)

 




Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Paul O
 

Doc, ‘snubbers’ prevent ‘standing waves’ or ‘reflections’ traveling back from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it ‘absorbs’ the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel wires; reduced by twisting the wires.

 

Paul O

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 1:14 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

 

Paul , iI thought that "snubber filters " prevented that?

Doc Colin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

AD
 

Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the bdl boards.

Can someone clear up this issue

Tony

On Mar 20, 2016, at 3:22 PM, 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Doc, 'snubbers' prevent 'standing waves' or 'reflections' traveling back
from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it 'absorbs' the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel wires;
reduced by twisting the wires.



Paul O



From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringF

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Steve Haas
 

<<When it comes to choosing how to bundle wires together, you do so by first identifying which of TWO GROUPS the layout wires fall into in terms of its function.>>

 

<<1) Power.   Any wire(s) that carry any form of power.   DCC track Power.  DC or AC Accessory Power, track drops, Turnout wiring (Frog, Switch Motor), Occupancy Detection Input (Track side). Structure lighting.>>

 

<<2) Control.  Any wire(s) that carry small control signals or functions.  DCC Cab/Throttle bus,  Signals, Occupancy Detection output (Control side).>>

 

<<It is NEVER MIX 120VAC or House Hold AC power with LAYOUT WIRING of any kind.  Layout wiring is all LOW VOLTAGE.    AC House Power is HIGH VOLTAGE.  The former is safe to touch.  The latter is not.>>

 

 

I concur with Mark on most of this, with one exception: DCC track power carries a signal and therefore should be separate from other wiring.

 

Here’s my perspective:

 

1)      As Mark says, always separate your high voltage (110/220) voltage from everything else,

2)      Separate track buses from all other wiring, A good location for track buses (everything from the booster out to the track) is at the back of the layout (thinking walk around here).  While either twisting wires, keeping them together by some other means, or keeping them far enough apart to cause problems are all acceptable, keeping them together is neater and frees up space under the layout.

3)      Separate cab bus from all other. Jacks for cabs are typically on the fascia, putting the cab bus near the fascia keeps it close to where it is used.

4)      All other – typically your AC and DC supplies for building lighting, etc.

5)      Wire routing:

a.  Avoid spaghetti wiring – wiring bundles should always follow the structural members of your layout – an example: along L-girder, then up to a joist and along that joist to a riser, up the riser to the roadbed, then along the roadbed to the point where the feeders drop down through the roadbed. If you run a local track bus, the feeders from your local distribution point to the track block should follow a similar route to the local track bus and then feeders dropped down to the that local track bus from the rail above.

b.  Always anchor wiring bundles where they turn (say from a joist to a riser).  

c.  Wiring should also have anchor points before they are attached to a device (signal, switch machine, stationary decoder, terminal strip, etc.) These anchors prevent a any tug on the wire somewhere out on the layout from causing a break of some type (broken sold joint, wire pulled from screw terminal, damage to device).

d. There is strength in numbers: always bundle wires of a like type.  I do a lot of electrical work on a DCC layout that was originally wired by folks without a lot of knowledge.  Retrofitting the layout has been a bit of a challenge.  In order to get the layout up the a desired level of DCC performance we’ve had to do a lot of rework, and sometimes one has to implement a temporary solution on the way to a permanent one.  In this case, we have often used scrap ends from surplus telephone cables to provide temporary cabling.  Once the layout has fully transitioned, the wire scraps will be replaced by more permanent cabling methods.

6)      Except for modules, I would discourage the practice of drill holes through joists or other framing materials (with the exception of holes through the road bed for track feeders and other equipment located on the surface of the layout).  Drill such holes is extra work. Routing wires through those holes results in the inability to easily re-route wires when needed – particularly if the wire in question is a track bus and has feeders soldered or otherwise connected to it – all those feeder joints need to be undone in order to move the bus.

 

Some one also mentioned the need to trace wires. One should never have to trace wires more than once. If you have wired correctly, you have documented your connections as you go. If you didn’t, the first time you have to trace a wire you should document it and never have to trace it again.

 

As a hobby, we seem to have lost sight of good wiring procedures over the years. If you want some good resources for “wiring right”, I recommend the following:

 

1)      Bill McClanahan’s “Wiring for Model Railroads” (Kalmbach),

2)      Any/All of Linn Westcott’s wiring articles in the 60’s and 70’s, and

3)      Both Volumes of Paul Mallory’s “Electrical Handbook for Model Railroads”.

 

While I suspect these are all out of print, they can be found occasionally on the used book markets, and they provide vital insight into how to do it, and more importantly, _Why_ you should do it right.

 

In closing, I’ll say that the smaller the layout, the less one needs to pay attention to this. However, as soon as one gets beyond a simple module or the classic  4 x 8, one needs to design, install and document.

 

It is also interesting that if one does it right to begin with, one rarely has to maintain things – the more you plan for the ease of maintenance down the road, the less you actually have to maintain things.

 

Food for thought.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

 

 

 

On Mar 19, 2016, at 9:53 AM, SBB_BLS_Bahnen@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:



I've found Velcro tape to work quite well. I cut short strips, and screw them to the benchwork. It's really easy to bundle the wires with them, and quick and easy to separate them again if you need to work on them.

-- 
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

 

---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.

 

Best Regards,

 

Mark Gurries

Electrical Engineer

DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

 

 



Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

If the bus run is only 9 ft long I wouldn't worry about. If it works OK now, just leave it as is. If you get false reports of occupancy, find a way to reduce the sensitivity of the bdl168.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 5:04 PM
To: 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...>
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the bdl boards.

Can someone clear up this issue

Tony
On Mar 20, 2016, at 3:22 PM, 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Doc, 'snubbers' prevent 'standing waves' or 'reflections' traveling
back from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it 'absorbs' the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel
wires; reduced by twisting the wires.



Paul O



From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringF

------------------------------------
Posted by: AD <bklyns_baseball_club@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Steve Haas
 

<<Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires
bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using
bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will
cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the
bdl boards.>>

Your wires should be twisted out to the point where you need to install your
BDL. After that, the wires should remain separate.

When locating your BDL's, give consideration to placing the BDLs as close to
the block they are monitoring as possible.

Best regards,

Steve

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Mark Cartwright
 

Doc,

I am currently (Pun Intended) embarking on a new method (at least for me) of wiring up my major layouts.
On my small test layout, there are Kato Plug ins which are then cut off at the ends and wired up to a standing terminal.
I have also used the 3 way tier Kato Blue Plugs.
=====
However....
For my next trick...
I am soldering different brands and types of track into 3 foot or 1 meter lengths. Instead of a simple plug in, I am drilling a hole to each side UNDER THE TRACK (Can't see it) And soldering a wire directly to the underside of the cutaway rail > Mostly where I am soldering anyway towards the center of the span.
Each rail wire is color coded.
Blue is the outside rail, white the inner rail.
Forget twisted pairs, I am separating each rail by continuity via two plastic wire tie mounts set side by side. This affords them at least 9 mm distance between the wires as are above with the rails.
===
Okay this may seem even stranger, as much of my track is Kato Unitrack. I wanted most of it to be removable for absolute cleaning for the next 30 years of my expected life span. So...each soldered section has it's own dual drop down leads. Between each snapped together section is a dab of dielectric grease.  Some of the track is lightly nailed down.  For now, I am not using an abundance of ballast.

>> I Know this seems amalgamous/very different and contrary to the very nature of Kato Unitrack stored under the bed in a Japanese Efficiency Apartment.
But I often digress from the norm, my ancestors had their own word for it.  We call it Dallas-ing, like a Maverick Steer which will suddenly separate itself from the rest of the heard. See the movie Red River, where John Wayne, suddenly decides to leave the Wagon Train. 
And instead of the 99....its in the Bible somewhere too. 

If a man owns  a hundred sheep....

>>> I buy my plastic ties and mounts in bulk and don't have an issue with using a lot of the clear ones as I go along. Eventually, I replace them with color coded ties at added expense.

What's this look like? Okay, first my shelf layout is mostly on removable 16" x 24" module trays set side by side ....The track lays separately top and can cross more than one module.  So the leads for now -- Dangle down and run to a central line which will run the perimeter of my basement.
How am I going to connect these dangling wires?
I don't know yet.
I may run some 12/2 Romex and simply solder the track leads direct. The DCC/Sound Controlled trains will never hit a soft spot due to corrosion/dirt below the rails.  I may also go down to the local boat shop for some serious tinned wire used in Marine Environments. 
===
There is yet another issue developing on my layouts...Lighting and Animation. Upwards of five motors per building and over 50 separate lights; perhaps by groups of as few as 3 lights separately controlled. Add to this, such other features as Miller Engineering Signs...local music/voice, smoke generators, chirping crickets and ?? a Klingon Bird of Prey, landed in the cleaning at the park which is cloaked when visitors come around.
Ah? ...
Well, I may need a computer very soon to figure it all out. 
>>> This then equates to the term LAN System or Local Area Network.

:)) Mark

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Max Maginness
 

The loop between the two convenience outlet boxes (bottom right) is not level.



Max



From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:57 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!





Ultimate example???

image1.jpeg

Cheers! Charles



Repeal the 17th Amendment.


On Mar 19, 2016, at 6:42 AM, @polka.co.za [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas; a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin



_____

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2016.0.7497 / Virus Database: 4545/11852 - Release Date: 03/20/16



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Mark Gurries
 

Unfortunately the BDL168 does not have a hardware sensitivity adjustment on the front end. It only has a post hardware "software sensitivity adjustment which does not address some of the problems.

https://sites.google.com/site/markgurries/home/dcc-problems/wiring-related/got-false-occupancy-detection/bd168

On Mar 20, 2016, at 5:34 PM, 'Vollrath, Don' dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

If the bus run is only 9 ft long I wouldn't worry about. If it works OK now, just leave it as is. If you get false reports of occupancy, find a way to reduce the sensitivity of the bdl168.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 5:04 PM
To: 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...>
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the bdl boards.

Can someone clear up this issue

Tony

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 20, 2016, at 3:22 PM, 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Doc, 'snubbers' prevent 'standing waves' or 'reflections' traveling
back from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it 'absorbs' the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel
wires; reduced by twisting the wires.



Paul O



From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringF

------------------------------------
Posted by: AD <bklyns_baseball_club@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links





------------------------------------
Posted by: "Vollrath, Don" <DVollrath@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Flash Gordon
 

In my state, Ohio, all that wire has to be covered or in conduit including the short wire to the two outlets. But it is beautiful.
Ed S


At 10:00 PM 3/20/2016, you wrote:
 

The loop between the two convenience outlet boxes (bottom right) is not level.

Max

From: WiringForDCC@... [ mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:57 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Ultimate example???

image1.jpeg

Cheers! Charles

Repeal the 17th Amendment.

On Mar 19, 2016, at 6:42 AM, colinseggie@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas; a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

_____

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