Date   
Re: Remote RRamp-like Indicators

Gregory Latiak
 

Well, I would except that the space available is barely larger than a single RRamp circuit board. I guess I don't really understand the issue of correctly measuring booster output -- I would speculate (and please correct me) that current flow should be straight forward, but voltage measurement for the DCC waveform is probably 'interesting'. I have a cased RRamp that I use for spot checking the track, so I probably don't really need running voltage from the booster or the idiot lights. If it ain't DCC coming from the booster than I probably have other issues.

Anyhow, if a regular digital amp meter will provide a reasonable value then I am probably ok with that.

greg

Re: Remote RRamp-like Indicators

Mark Gurries
 

The complexity of the voltage waveform is the same for the current waveform.  Both are bipolar pulses.  A waveform that the most common DVM meters are not designed to read correctly.  The bridge rectifier removes the bi-polar nature of the rectangular waveforms to a unipolar output.  Given the waveform is a rectangular, the end result is that the rectifier converts the rectangular AC to 99% DC which any meter can measure accurately.

As Don said, there is calibration issue when reading voltage.  You ave to account for the two diode voltage drops.

For current, the bridge rectifier does not introduce an error term but does reduce the final track voltage by two diode voltage drops.   If a locomotive crosses a booster district where the track current is NOT monitored to one that is monitored, you can see the engine speed change.    However, higher end DCC decoder with BEMF motor drive will minimize/compensate for that effect.

Taking a step back, I am always wondering why people think is it important to monitor the booster voltage and current.    If you think it will give you a heads up on booster overload, that is not what actually happens.  Most overload problem are not related to train running issue.  They are recovery from a short circuit while dealing with high inrush current issues.


On Mar 9, 2016, at 9:57 AM, glatiak@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Well, I would except that the space available is barely larger than a single RRamp circuit board. I guess I don't really understand the issue of correctly measuring booster output -- I would speculate (and please correct me) that current flow should be straight forward, but voltage measurement for the DCC waveform is probably 'interesting'. I have a cased RRamp that I use for spot checking the track, so I probably don't really need running voltage from the booster or the idiot lights. If it ain't DCC coming from the booster than I probably have other issues.

Anyhow, if a regular digital amp meter will provide a reasonable value then I am probably ok with that.

greg

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Remote RRamp-like Indicators

Mark Gurries
 

I should say the bipolar current waveform that although is rectangular is NOT in any time sync with the DCC voltage waveform.  The current pulses come from decoders that are actively driving motors with pulses (PWM) asyncrounsly with the DCC voltage waveform.  it is a random composite of all the decoder motor current pulses that are running.  But the end result through the rectifier is still DC although pulsed DC….the meter will report the AVERAGE value of the collective current pulses.  It will NOT report the peak current which is what the booster monitors.

On Mar 9, 2016, at 11:11 AM, Mark Gurries gurriesm@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

The complexity of the voltage waveform is the same for the current waveform.  Both are bipolar pulses.  A waveform that the most common DVM meters are not designed to read correctly.  The bridge rectifier removes the bi-polar nature of the rectangular waveforms to a unipolar output.  Given the waveform is a rectangular, the end result is that the rectifier converts the rectangular AC to 99% DC which any meter can measure accurately.

As Don said, there is calibration issue when reading voltage.  You ave to account for the two diode voltage drops.

For current, the bridge rectifier does not introduce an error term but does reduce the final track voltage by two diode voltage drops.   If a locomotive crosses a booster district where the track current is NOT monitored to one that is monitored, you can see the engine speed change.    However, higher end DCC decoder with BEMF motor drive will minimize/compensate for that effect.

Taking a step back, I am always wondering why people think is it important to monitor the booster voltage and current.    If you think it will give you a heads up on booster overload, that is not what actually happens.  Most overload problem are not related to train running issue.  They are recovery from a short circuit while dealing with high inrush current issues.


On Mar 9, 2016, at 9:57 AM, glatiak@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Well, I would except that the space available is barely larger than a single RRamp circuit board. I guess I don't really understand the issue of correctly measuring booster output -- I would speculate (and please correct me) that current flow should be straight forward, but voltage measurement for the DCC waveform is probably 'interesting'. I have a cased RRamp that I use for spot checking the track, so I probably don't really need running voltage from the booster or the idiot lights. If it ain't DCC coming from the booster than I probably have other issues.

Anyhow, if a regular digital amp meter will provide a reasonable value then I am probably ok with that.

greg

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com




Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Remote RRamp-like Indicators

Richard Gagnon
 

This has been sufficient for our club using the five amp NCE Power Pro. I used the voltmeter circuit with a LED display so we could easily see the reading anywhere in the room.
At home, I used the current option using a Harbor Freight meter on the 20 ma scale. I have four of these meters and they all agree.
I have a high amperage rheostat that I clipped across the track and lower the resistance until the booster trips. Tripped at about 4.97 amps as I recall.

The meters read 13.6 VAC across the tracks and are sufficient for voltage readings. A Scope showed us hardly any spiking.

DCC Ammeter (2010)

  More options below.

DCC Voltages


 

Rich

Re: Remote RRamp-like Indicators

Gregory Latiak
 

Thanks for this. Looks like something within my skills to fabricate.

greg

Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

colinseggie@...
 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Charles Brumbelow
 

Ultimate example???
Cheers! Charles


Repeal the 17th Amendment. 

On Mar 19, 2016, at 6:42 AM, colinseggie@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

john
 

Hi Doc,
   If you are going to have many wires, D rings (Distributing rings) running the longest length, even around corners work. Wiring from devices can be run in smaller rings, bundles or stapled toward the D rings. It is easy to run new wires and trace old wires in rings because the bundle remains loose.
   You will find that commercial rings are expensive but you can buy 1/2 inch by 1/16 aluminum and make your own. Rings can be opened if necessary if you  missed a ring when installing
   Bundling wires serves another purpose by canceling radiation noise which can be a bother with DCC.  Don't run 110v wiring with your low voltage stuff, it is not worth the risk.
   If you have a small layout you can use cable ties that come with mounting holes and tabs to make them reusable. Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.
   You could drill holes in your girders but I find that unforgiving. Seems like I remember a lot of do overs.
Good luck
john


On Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM, "colinseggie@... [WiringForDCC]" wrote:




Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin



Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Tim Johnson
 

I've found Velcro tape to work quite well. I cut short strips, and screw them to the benchwork. It's really easy to bundle the wires with them, and quick and easy to separate them again if you need to work on them.
-- 
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

---In WiringForDCC@..., <john.p.dunn@...> wrote :

Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Mark Gurries
 

When it comes to choosing how to bundle wires together, you do so by first identifying which of TWO GROUPS the layout wires fall into in terms of its function.

1) Power.   Any wire(s) that carry any form of power.   DCC track Power.  DC or AC Accessory Power, track drops, Turnout wiring (Frog, Switch Motor), Occupancy Detection Input (Track side). Structure lighting.


2) Control.  Any wire(s) that carry small control signals or functions.  DCC Cab/Throttle bus,  Signals, Occupancy Detection output (Control side).


It is NEVER MIX 120VAC or House Hold AC power with LAYOUT WIRING of any kind.  Layout wiring is all LOW VOLTAGE.    AC House Power is HIGH VOLTAGE.  The former is safe to touch.  The latter is not.


On Mar 19, 2016, at 9:53 AM, SBB_BLS_Bahnen@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

I've found Velcro tape to work quite well. I cut short strips, and screw them to the benchwork. It's really easy to bundle the wires with them, and quick and easy to separate them again if you need to work on them.
--
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Paul O
 

Doc, lots of long wires neatly bundled together could cause cross-talk;

"spaghetti junction" wiring eliminates that. J

 

Paul O

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Doc Colin <colinseggie@...>
 

Paul , iI thought that "snubber filters " prevented that?
Doc Colin
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 6:33 AM
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

Doc, lots of long wires neatly bundled together could cause cross-talk;

"spaghetti junction" wiring eliminates that. J

Paul O

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Don,

The snubber/filters on the DCC track power bus serve a different purpose. The primary purpose is to absorb and reduce voltage transients on the buss of surges caused by intermittent connections to train wheels and/or short circuits. The inductance of DCC bus wiring (untwisted and length) amplifies those effects.

 

The reason to separate DCC power wiring from wires like the cab bus and other signaling feedback wiring is to reduce the possibility of normal and abnormal DCC switching causing interference with those circuits.

 

 

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 12:14 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 




Paul , iI thought that "snubber filters " prevented that?

Doc Colin

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 6:33 AM

Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

 

Doc, lots of long wires neatly bundled together could cause cross-talk;

"spaghetti junction" wiring eliminates that. J

Paul O

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 19, 2016 7:42 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

Hi Guys ,
I have been searching Google for some ideas of keeping the Wiring of our tracks neat and tidy. Whilst there are some good ideas;  a lot of pics show
"spaghetti junction"
Any body out there with a plan/diagram from the mains to boosters to control, etc that would like to share i would be most grateful.
DocColin




Re: Wiring for A Wye

mikedolan34
 

Hi Don.
Sorry for the delay returning you thoughts on the Wye. 2 legs of the Wye measure 43" and the 3rd leg is 53". They have been working for a couple of years at this length. Trains running on the set up don't tend to be extremely long.
Outside the box question: Could a PM42 be setup to power each leg? If each leg is set as a reversing section on the PM42, would the PM react if the polarity was the same and only react on the leg that is not?
I intend to power the legs from a DB150.
Mike Dolan


From: "Don' dvollrath@... 'Vollrath [WiringForDCC]"
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, February 21, 2016 11:18:30 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Wiring for A Wye

 

Mike
You can use a DPDT toggle switch to select which leg of the wye will be a reversing leg at setup time. Insulate both rails of each leg. Wire the rails of each leg to the 'throw' terminals of a separate DPDT toggle switch. Wire one end of each toggle switch to an AR unit. Wire the other side is the switch to fixed DCC. Flip the toggles to suit the setup. An alternate setup would be to let both legs be of fixed polarity and make the third switch of the wye determine the polarity of the turnout and tracks beyond according to the direction of the throw bar.
DonV


On Feb 21, 2016, at 10:00 PM, pkmjd@... [WiringForDCC] > wrote:

I belong to a Free-Mo Modular group and have a question concerning Wye wiring.
The nature of our group is such that each setup is different from the previous. I have built a Wye for use in the group and wired as it is, requires placement the same at each set up.
I would like to rewire this so that each leg of the wye could be swapped for the purpose of the reversing polarity. I would like to control each leg of the wye so that I could have Leg A as the reversing section at a set up but have Leg C as the reversing section at the next set up.
I've looked at SPST or DPDT toggles or maybe a 3 way Guitar type switch is required. But I'm confused.
Appreciate any feedback.
Mike Dolan
(New Member)


Re: Wiring for A Wye

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Yes. An auto-reverser will be totally happy when the polarity of the track is the same at each end of the sometimes A-R section. Once triggered to the proper polarity, it just stays that way.

DonV  

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 11:34 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Wiring for A Wye

 




Hi Don.

Sorry for the delay returning you thoughts on the Wye. 2 legs of the Wye measure 43" and the 3rd leg is 53". They have been working for a couple of years at this length. Trains running on the set up don't tend to be extremely long.

Outside the box question: Could a PM42 be setup to power each leg? If each leg is set as a reversing section on the PM42, would the PM react if the polarity was the same and only react on the leg that is not?

I intend to power the legs from a DB150.

Mike Dolan


From: "Don' dvollrath@... 'Vollrath [WiringForDCC]" <WiringForDCC@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sunday, February 21, 2016 11:18:30 PM
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Wiring for A Wye

 

 

Mike
You can use a DPDT toggle switch to select which leg of the wye will be a reversing leg at setup time. Insulate both rails of each leg. Wire the rails of each leg to the 'throw' terminals of a separate DPDT toggle switch. Wire one end of each toggle switch to an AR unit. Wire the other side is the switch to fixed DCC. Flip the toggles to suit the setup. An alternate setup would be to let both legs be of fixed polarity and make the third switch of the wye determine the polarity of the turnout and tracks beyond according to the direction of the throw bar.
DonV


On Feb 21, 2016, at 10:00 PM, pkmjd@...<mailto:pkmjd@...> [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...<mailto:WiringForDCC@...>> wrote:

I belong to a Free-Mo Modular group and have a question concerning Wye wiring.
The nature of our group is such that each setup is different from the previous. I have built a Wye for use in the group and wired as it is, requires placement the same at each set up.
I would like to rewire this so that each leg of the wye could be swapped for the purpose of the reversing polarity. I would like to control each leg of the wye so that I could have Leg A as the reversing section at a set up but have Leg C as the reversing section at the next set up.
I've looked at SPST or DPDT toggles or maybe a 3 way Guitar type switch is required. But I'm confused.
Appreciate any feedback.
Mike Dolan
(New Member)

 




Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Paul O
 

Doc, ‘snubbers’ prevent ‘standing waves’ or ‘reflections’ traveling back from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it ‘absorbs’ the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel wires; reduced by twisting the wires.

 

Paul O

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 1:14 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

 

 

Paul , iI thought that "snubber filters " prevented that?

Doc Colin

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

AD
 

Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the bdl boards.

Can someone clear up this issue

Tony

On Mar 20, 2016, at 3:22 PM, 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Doc, 'snubbers' prevent 'standing waves' or 'reflections' traveling back
from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it 'absorbs' the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel wires;
reduced by twisting the wires.



Paul O



From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringF

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Steve Haas
 

<<When it comes to choosing how to bundle wires together, you do so by first identifying which of TWO GROUPS the layout wires fall into in terms of its function.>>

 

<<1) Power.   Any wire(s) that carry any form of power.   DCC track Power.  DC or AC Accessory Power, track drops, Turnout wiring (Frog, Switch Motor), Occupancy Detection Input (Track side). Structure lighting.>>

 

<<2) Control.  Any wire(s) that carry small control signals or functions.  DCC Cab/Throttle bus,  Signals, Occupancy Detection output (Control side).>>

 

<<It is NEVER MIX 120VAC or House Hold AC power with LAYOUT WIRING of any kind.  Layout wiring is all LOW VOLTAGE.    AC House Power is HIGH VOLTAGE.  The former is safe to touch.  The latter is not.>>

 

 

I concur with Mark on most of this, with one exception: DCC track power carries a signal and therefore should be separate from other wiring.

 

Here’s my perspective:

 

1)      As Mark says, always separate your high voltage (110/220) voltage from everything else,

2)      Separate track buses from all other wiring, A good location for track buses (everything from the booster out to the track) is at the back of the layout (thinking walk around here).  While either twisting wires, keeping them together by some other means, or keeping them far enough apart to cause problems are all acceptable, keeping them together is neater and frees up space under the layout.

3)      Separate cab bus from all other. Jacks for cabs are typically on the fascia, putting the cab bus near the fascia keeps it close to where it is used.

4)      All other – typically your AC and DC supplies for building lighting, etc.

5)      Wire routing:

a.  Avoid spaghetti wiring – wiring bundles should always follow the structural members of your layout – an example: along L-girder, then up to a joist and along that joist to a riser, up the riser to the roadbed, then along the roadbed to the point where the feeders drop down through the roadbed. If you run a local track bus, the feeders from your local distribution point to the track block should follow a similar route to the local track bus and then feeders dropped down to the that local track bus from the rail above.

b.  Always anchor wiring bundles where they turn (say from a joist to a riser).  

c.  Wiring should also have anchor points before they are attached to a device (signal, switch machine, stationary decoder, terminal strip, etc.) These anchors prevent a any tug on the wire somewhere out on the layout from causing a break of some type (broken sold joint, wire pulled from screw terminal, damage to device).

d. There is strength in numbers: always bundle wires of a like type.  I do a lot of electrical work on a DCC layout that was originally wired by folks without a lot of knowledge.  Retrofitting the layout has been a bit of a challenge.  In order to get the layout up the a desired level of DCC performance we’ve had to do a lot of rework, and sometimes one has to implement a temporary solution on the way to a permanent one.  In this case, we have often used scrap ends from surplus telephone cables to provide temporary cabling.  Once the layout has fully transitioned, the wire scraps will be replaced by more permanent cabling methods.

6)      Except for modules, I would discourage the practice of drill holes through joists or other framing materials (with the exception of holes through the road bed for track feeders and other equipment located on the surface of the layout).  Drill such holes is extra work. Routing wires through those holes results in the inability to easily re-route wires when needed – particularly if the wire in question is a track bus and has feeders soldered or otherwise connected to it – all those feeder joints need to be undone in order to move the bus.

 

Some one also mentioned the need to trace wires. One should never have to trace wires more than once. If you have wired correctly, you have documented your connections as you go. If you didn’t, the first time you have to trace a wire you should document it and never have to trace it again.

 

As a hobby, we seem to have lost sight of good wiring procedures over the years. If you want some good resources for “wiring right”, I recommend the following:

 

1)      Bill McClanahan’s “Wiring for Model Railroads” (Kalmbach),

2)      Any/All of Linn Westcott’s wiring articles in the 60’s and 70’s, and

3)      Both Volumes of Paul Mallory’s “Electrical Handbook for Model Railroads”.

 

While I suspect these are all out of print, they can be found occasionally on the used book markets, and they provide vital insight into how to do it, and more importantly, _Why_ you should do it right.

 

In closing, I’ll say that the smaller the layout, the less one needs to pay attention to this. However, as soon as one gets beyond a simple module or the classic  4 x 8, one needs to design, install and document.

 

It is also interesting that if one does it right to begin with, one rarely has to maintain things – the more you plan for the ease of maintenance down the road, the less you actually have to maintain things.

 

Food for thought.

 

Best regards,

 

Steve Haas

Snoqualmie, WA

 

 

 

 

On Mar 19, 2016, at 9:53 AM, SBB_BLS_Bahnen@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:



I've found Velcro tape to work quite well. I cut short strips, and screw them to the benchwork. It's really easy to bundle the wires with them, and quick and easy to separate them again if you need to work on them.

-- 
Tim
Timothy A Johnson, Tucson, AZ (www.sbb-bls-bahnen.com)
European Train Enthusiasts, Central Arizona Chapter (www.ete.org)

 

---In WiringForDCC@..., wrote :

Another option for a small project is Velcro tape.

 

Best Regards,

 

Mark Gurries

Electrical Engineer

DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

 

 



Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

If the bus run is only 9 ft long I wouldn't worry about. If it works OK now, just leave it as is. If you get false reports of occupancy, find a way to reduce the sensitivity of the bdl168.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Sunday, March 20, 2016 5:04 PM
To: 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...>
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the bdl boards.

Can someone clear up this issue

Tony
On Mar 20, 2016, at 3:22 PM, 'Paul O' @Paul78 [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Doc, 'snubbers' prevent 'standing waves' or 'reflections' traveling
back from an un-terminated bus that has an AC signal on it.

Basically, it 'absorbs' the signal.

Crosstalk is capacitive coupling caused by long, close, parallel
wires; reduced by twisting the wires.



Paul O



From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringF

------------------------------------
Posted by: AD <bklyns_baseball_club@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links

Re: Keeping It All Nice Neat And Tidy!!

Steve Haas
 

<<Under this topic someone whose email I just lost said that long wires
bundled together should be twisted to avoid problems. But if your using
bdl168 to detect trains located in blocks and those wires if twisted will
cause pickup problems then what do I do to get my 9 foot long wires to the
bdl boards.>>

Your wires should be twisted out to the point where you need to install your
BDL. After that, the wires should remain separate.

When locating your BDL's, give consideration to placing the BDLs as close to
the block they are monitoring as possible.

Best regards,

Steve

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA