Date   
Re: Positioning Block Detectors for AIU-01

John Cahill
 

Thanks Don. That is very helpful! I had been trying to figure out using a schematic diagram but what you suggest tells me distances are critical so would seem I need to figure out rough positions of BDs & AIUs on a scale drawing first. It is good to have a starting point and direction to go in!

Best Regards,
John

On Nov 13, 2015, at 15:29, "'Vollrath, Don' dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC]" <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

 

John,

 

The occupancy detectors like the BD20 want to be in relatively close proximity of the track sections being monitored. The output of the BD20’s are low level circuits and subject to electrical noise. But the NCE AIU talks to the command station via the cab bus. And the length of the cab bus back to the PowerPro command station is not that critical.

I would place each AIU unit somewhat centrally located around the cluster of BD20’s it is monitoring, and simply route/wire and daisy chain the cab bus to each AIU.

If you find that there is 1 or 2 BD20’s that end up being remotely mounted from its monitoring AIU, use a twisted pair to wire it back to the AIU to minimize interference. [The BD20 really doesn’t need a power supply for operation. The power supply is there to only light an LED if you think you need it.]

 

DonV   

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2015 5:10 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Positioning Block Detectors for AIU-01

 



I have a HO layout which measures 25' X 13' in a U footprint (base is 13', legs 25') and has a new terminus station which was built with block detection wired in as it was constructed, using a mix of BD20 and HDL hdM14 4-way units.  The rest of the layout is about to be rewired for block detection but due to its physical form, fiddle-yard, two through stations and mainline runs, there will be a lot (30+) of detectors scattered across the layout.

What is the ideal way to optimize the wiring back to 3 AIU-01's?  Is it OK to have long runs back to a single base?  Should the AIU's all be in the same place? How close to the PowerPro does the AIU-01 need to be? Ultimately the AIUs will connect back to a laptop.  Obviously, avoiding interference is a priority, while minimizing wiring runs is also desirable.  Any thoughts, ideas and general rules would be appreciated. Thanks in advance,

John Cahill

 




Re: Positioning Block Detectors for AIU-01

Mark Gurries
 

Don is right on….. 

Clarification…The output of a BD20 itself is not that sensitive to noise.  From a noise standpoint Its got a huge capacitor (0.47uF) directly across its output.  AKA a noise short circuit.   The AIU input also has some RC filtering but has a very low threshold of detection (TTL) that is not the same as the LED indication threshold (CMOS).   It is more sensitive than the LED indications would indicated.   Anyway, what this means is the noise gets in is the cable running between the BD20 and the AIU and it can create false/random states.

But to be clear, do not move a BD20 further away from it detected block out of interest of getting it closer to the AIU.  Optimize the location of the BD20 first and then after that is done, given the locations of the BD20, figure out a common central place for a AIU to pick up a lot of them.  

Steady state problems are easy to fix.  But what typically happen on a layout is they are not steady.  They appear to be random and mysterious for it depends on what is running or not on the layout and where the trains are. It like there is a ghost in the wiring.   There is no ghost.  It just understanding what if happening with regard to the wiring.  The BD20 to AIU wiring is less of a problematic issue than the BD20 to the block wiring basic detection reliability issues.  Also if there is a problem, its a lot easier to fix the BD20 to AIU cable wiring than it is to fix the track block to BD20 cable wiring.   Never run/bundle a BD20/AIU cable in with a DCC track bus cable paths.  It is perfectly OK to run one or multiple BD20/AIU cable along or in the Cab bus cable path.

AIU Utilization:  Remember your AIU also typically include turnout position feedback.  If you have a multi level layout, think about a given AIU picking those blocks and turnouts that are not that far away wiring distance wise.  HOWEVER, is is better to have multiple AIU than to FORCE one AIU to pick up all the BD20 and Turnouts on a large layout.   If you running more than a 1/3 of the AUI connection a long distance of 25 feet or longer, then it time to START thinking about getting another AIU and/or twisted pair wiring.  Twisted pair wiring address the noise pickup issue between the BD20 and the AIU up to a point.   Just use twisted pair wiring up front and help yourself in the long run at the time of installation.

Door bell wire historically has been sold in basic 2 wire twisted pair format without a jacket.  Red and White are common wire pair colors.  Being a unique combo color code, it will be easy to identify the cable under the layout in the future.

On Nov 13, 2015, at 9:22 AM, John Cahill johncahill25@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Thanks Don. That is very helpful! I had been trying to figure out using a schematic diagram but what you suggest tells me distances are critical so would seem I need to figure out rough positions of BDs & AIUs on a scale drawing first. It is good to have a starting point and direction to go in!

Best Regards,
John

On Nov 13, 2015, at 15:29, "'Vollrath, Don' dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC]" <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

 

John,

 

The occupancy detectors like the BD20 want to be in relatively close proximity of the track sections being monitored. The output of the BD20’s are low level circuits and subject to electrical noise. But the NCE AIU talks to the command station via the cab bus. And the length of the cab bus back to the PowerPro command station is not that critical.

I would place each AIU unit somewhat centrally located around the cluster of BD20’s it is monitoring, and simply route/wire and daisy chain the cab bus to each AIU.

If you find that there is 1 or 2 BD20’s that end up being remotely mounted from its monitoring AIU, use a twisted pair to wire it back to the AIU to minimize interference. [The BD20 really doesn’t need a power supply for operation. The power supply is there to only light an LED if you think you need it.]

 

DonV   

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2015 5:10 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Positioning Block Detectors for AIU-01

 



I have a HO layout which measures 25' X 13' in a U footprint (base is 13', legs 25') and has a new terminus station which was built with block detection wired in as it was constructed, using a mix of BD20 and HDL hdM14 4-way units.  The rest of the layout is about to be rewired for block detection but due to its physical form, fiddle-yard, two through stations and mainline runs, there will be a lot (30+) of detectors scattered across the layout.

What is the ideal way to optimize the wiring back to 3 AIU-01's?  Is it OK to have long runs back to a single base?  Should the AIU's all be in the same place? How close to the PowerPro does the AIU-01 need to be? Ultimately the AIUs will connect back to a laptop.  Obviously, avoiding interference is a priority, while minimizing wiring runs is also desirable.  Any thoughts, ideas and general rules would be appreciated. Thanks in advance,

John Cahill

 






Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Positioning Block Detectors for AIU-01

John Cahill
 

Mark, thanks a lot for that detailed technical information and the practical advice! In particular the suggestion of using bell wire is a cheap and practical wiring solution and will make the rewiring effort easier and I will definitely be using that approach.  I may need more AIU's than originally planned, but it will be worth it to avoid trouble in the future.

The advice (now and in the past) from you and Don and other contributors has been invaluable!
Thanks again!
John

On Fri, Nov 13, 2015 at 6:23 PM, Mark Gurries gurriesm@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:
 

Don is right on….. 

Clarification…The output of a BD20 itself is not that sensitive to noise.  From a noise standpoint Its got a huge capacitor (0.47uF) directly across its output.  AKA a noise short circuit.   The AIU input also has some RC filtering but has a very low threshold of detection (TTL) that is not the same as the LED indication threshold (CMOS).   It is more sensitive than the LED indications would indicated.   Anyway, what this means is the noise gets in is the cable running between the BD20 and the AIU and it can create false/random states.

But to be clear, do not move a BD20 further away from it detected block out of interest of getting it closer to the AIU.  Optimize the location of the BD20 first and then after that is done, given the locations of the BD20, figure out a common central place for a AIU to pick up a lot of them.  

Steady state problems are easy to fix.  But what typically happen on a layout is they are not steady.  They appear to be random and mysterious for it depends on what is running or not on the layout and where the trains are. It like there is a ghost in the wiring.   There is no ghost.  It just understanding what if happening with regard to the wiring.  The BD20 to AIU wiring is less of a problematic issue than the BD20 to the block wiring basic detection reliability issues.  Also if there is a problem, its a lot easier to fix the BD20 to AIU cable wiring than it is to fix the track block to BD20 cable wiring.   Never run/bundle a BD20/AIU cable in with a DCC track bus cable paths.  It is perfectly OK to run one or multiple BD20/AIU cable along or in the Cab bus cable path.

AIU Utilization:  Remember your AIU also typically include turnout position feedback.  If you have a multi level layout, think about a given AIU picking those blocks and turnouts that are not that far away wiring distance wise.  HOWEVER, is is better to have multiple AIU than to FORCE one AIU to pick up all the BD20 and Turnouts on a large layout.   If you running more than a 1/3 of the AUI connection a long distance of 25 feet or longer, then it time to START thinking about getting another AIU and/or twisted pair wiring.  Twisted pair wiring address the noise pickup issue between the BD20 and the AIU up to a point.   Just use twisted pair wiring up front and help yourself in the long run at the time of installation.

Door bell wire historically has been sold in basic 2 wire twisted pair format without a jacket.  Red and White are common wire pair colors.  Being a unique combo color code, it will be easy to identify the cable under the layout in the future.

On Nov 13, 2015, at 9:22 AM, John Cahill johncahill25@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Thanks Don. That is very helpful! I had been trying to figure out using a schematic diagram but what you suggest tells me distances are critical so would seem I need to figure out rough positions of BDs & AIUs on a scale drawing first. It is good to have a starting point and direction to go in!

Best Regards,
John

On Nov 13, 2015, at 15:29, "'Vollrath, Don' dvollrath@... [WiringForDCC]" <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

 

John,

 

The occupancy detectors like the BD20 want to be in relatively close proximity of the track sections being monitored. The output of the BD20’s are low level circuits and subject to electrical noise. But the NCE AIU talks to the command station via the cab bus. And the length of the cab bus back to the PowerPro command station is not that critical.

I would place each AIU unit somewhat centrally located around the cluster of BD20’s it is monitoring, and simply route/wire and daisy chain the cab bus to each AIU.

If you find that there is 1 or 2 BD20’s that end up being remotely mounted from its monitoring AIU, use a twisted pair to wire it back to the AIU to minimize interference. [The BD20 really doesn’t need a power supply for operation. The power supply is there to only light an LED if you think you need it.]

 

DonV   

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 12, 2015 5:10 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Positioning Block Detectors for AIU-01

 



I have a HO layout which measures 25' X 13' in a U footprint (base is 13', legs 25') and has a new terminus station which was built with block detection wired in as it was constructed, using a mix of BD20 and HDL hdM14 4-way units.  The rest of the layout is about to be rewired for block detection but due to its physical form, fiddle-yard, two through stations and mainline runs, there will be a lot (30+) of detectors scattered across the layout.

What is the ideal way to optimize the wiring back to 3 AIU-01's?  Is it OK to have long runs back to a single base?  Should the AIU's all be in the same place? How close to the PowerPro does the AIU-01 need to be? Ultimately the AIUs will connect back to a laptop.  Obviously, avoiding interference is a priority, while minimizing wiring runs is also desirable.  Any thoughts, ideas and general rules would be appreciated. Thanks in advance,

John Cahill

 






Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com




Hello

railbob4449
 

Thanks for allowing me to participate in this group. I belong to the Mt Hood RR Club in Portland OR and the Klickitat & Western RR in Goldendale WA. Both clubs converted to Digitrax years ago and now have grown big enough to no longer get by on a sub par installation. You know the usual things continue to rear there ugly head. Ground loops, phone cables, running off the side of the UP5 panels and such. Just last week during open house we had a catastrophic loss of control that I think I can contribute to the lugs on one of the BD150 being loose enough the jumpeer fell out when I move it. Anyway I have gleamed a great deal of good info from the web page and hope to do the same here.

Bob Chapman

Re: Hello

Mark Gurries
 

Welcome to the group Bob.


On Nov 13, 2015, at 1:41 PM, rhysc@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Thanks for allowing me to participate in this group. I belong to the Mt Hood RR Club in Portland OR and the Klickitat & Western RR in Goldendale WA. Both clubs converted to Digitrax years ago and now have grown big enough to no longer get by on a sub par installation. You know the usual things continue to rear there ugly head. Ground loops, phone cables, running off the side of the UP5 panels and such. Just last week during open house we had a catastrophic loss of control that I think I can contribute to the lugs on one of the BD150 being loose enough the jumpeer fell out when I move it. Anyway I have gleamed a great deal of good info from the web page and hope to do the same here.

Bob Chapman


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: PC based storage oscilloscope

aaronmorley@y7mail.com
 

Yeah, current clamp probes can be relatively handy, if something like an AIM I-prober 520 is out of your price range (and let's face it, it is!) - approx $1500+!

Then Hantek make the CC65 which in all honestly, and with all charitability is rubbish in comparison but 'does the job' (almost), for $65 or so.

Aaron.

Re: PC based storage oscilloscope

Dale Gloer
 

Don, Aaron.

The current probe is an interesting device and of course, being a tool slut, I want one.  However for the problem I was trying to solve, I could observe the current waveform and intensity because the detectors I'm using use current transformers for sensing.  Once I got my scope, it was "just" a learning curve to interpret and trust what I was seeing.

Dale Gloer


---In WiringForDCC@..., <aaronmorley@...> wrote :

Yeah, current clamp probes can be relatively handy, if something like an AIM I-prober 520 is out of your price range (and let's face it, it is!) - approx $1500+!

Then Hantek make the CC65 which in all honestly, and with all charitability is rubbish in comparison but 'does the job' (almost), for $65 or so.

Aaron.

Where to Put the Limiting Resistor

Glenn
 

I am wiring a scratch built loco with limited interior space.

 

The wiring diagram for my decoder shows a resistor in each lead, front and rear. Could the resistor be installed in the common (blue) lead and cover both LEDs?

 

Only one LED will be illuminated at a time. Could both be on at the same time? I am using 100K 1/4W resistors.

 

Glenn

 

 

Re: Where to Put the Limiting Resistor

Thomas
 

Glenn
I am surprised at a 100K resistor. A 1K ohm resistor and 12 volts would result in .01 amps for the LED.
You might need to go to 680 ohms or ? depending on the brightness you want. It may be OK to put the resistor
in the blue lead if the two LED outputs are the only functions, but I would put a separate resistor for each LED.
I would put in separate resistors as a matter of practice. They are quit cheap and small.
Tom


From: "'Glenn' ghazel@... [WiringForDCC]"
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2015 11:54 AM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Where to Put the Limiting Resistor

 
I am wiring a scratch built loco with limited interior space.
 
The wiring diagram for my decoder shows a resistor in each lead, front and rear. Could the resistor be installed in the common (blue) lead and cover both LEDs?
 
Only one LED will be illuminated at a time. Could both be on at the same time? I am using 100K 1/4W resistors.
 
Glenn
 
 







Re: Where to Put the Limiting Resistor

Michael Picco
 

If they are the high brightness LED's, you might want to limit the current to no more than 5 milliamps, up to 10 milliamps if they are the standard LED's.� The 100K value seems quite high and needs to be weighed against the voltage coming to the resistor.� You should be able to get by with something on the order of 1500 to 2000 ohms.� If the LED's will never be on at the same time, you can use one resistor in the common leg.� Otherwise it would be best to put a resistor in for each LED.� The latter is a better practice, in general.

Michael


On 11/16/2015 8:54 AM, 'Glenn' ghazel@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
�

I am wiring a scratch built loco with limited interior space.

�

The wiring diagram for my decoder shows a resistor in each lead, front and rear. Could the resistor be installed in the common (blue) lead and cover both LEDs?

�

Only one LED will be illuminated at a time. Could both be on at the same time? I am using 100K 1/4W resistors.

�

Glenn

�

�


Re: Where to Put the Limiting Resistor

Mark Gurries
 

On Nov 16, 2015, at 8:54 AM, 'Glenn' ghazel@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:
I am wiring a scratch built loco with limited interior space.

The wiring diagram for my decoder shows a resistor in each lead, front and rear.
Could the resistor be installed in the common (blue) lead and cover both LEDs?
No. The diagram is correct.

Using a single common resistor will result two independent problems.

1) Variable LED brightness depending on the combination of LEDs that are on. This including the possibility of one of them stops working (no damage).
2) If you set the resistor value for all 3 LED to be proper brightness, but then only turn on one, you could overdrive the LED with to much current (damage).

What you can do is use small resistors. 1/4W wire leaded types are very small as far as those type of resistors are concerned.

Only one LED will be illuminated at a time. Could both be on at the same time? I am using 100K 1/4W resistors.
All white LEDs are high efficiency types. Assuming your using high efficiency white LED, such a high value 100K (100,000 ohms) will result in a dim LED.

This brightness is subjective if you talking about interior, cab, or marker lights. But when it comes to headlights, you typically want something bright.

The most common value of resistance per LED to start with for headlights is 1K (1000 Ohms).

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

Short reverse loops

Lee Hanna
 

Group,  I know that ideally a reverse loop should be longer than the longest train.  But what can one do about a reverse loop that already exists and is shorter than it should be? (I'm talking passenger trains with lighted cars.)


Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks much.


Lee

Re: Where to Put the Limiting Resistor

Michael Picco
 

On 11/16/2015 10:42 AM, Michael Picco wrote:
On 11/16/2015 8:54 AM, 'Glenn' ghazel@... [WiringForDCC] wrote:
 

I am wiring a scratch built loco with limited interior space.

 

The wiring diagram for my decoder shows a resistor in each lead, front and rear. Could the resistor be installed in the common (blue) lead and cover both LEDs?

 

Only one LED will be illuminated at a time. Could both be on at the same time? I am using 100K 1/4W resistors.

 

Glenn

 

 

If they are the high brightness LED's, you might want to limit the current to no more than 5 milliamps, up to 10 milliamps if they are the standard LED's.  The 100K value needs to be weighed against the voltage coming to the resistor.  You should be able to get by with something on the order of 1500 to 2000 ohms.  If the LED's will never be on at the same time, you can use one resistor in the common leg.  Otherwise it would be best to put a resistor in for each LED.

Michael


Re: Short reverse loops

Charles Brumbelow
 

Shorten the train or lengthen the track. If the loco is going to hit the observation car as it tries to exit the loop, nothing you can do just with wiring will change that. Charles

On Nov 19, 2015, at 1:17 PM, lee.hanna60@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Group,  I know that ideally a reverse loop should be longer than the longest train.  But what can one do about a reverse loop that already exists and is shorter than it should be? (I'm talking passenger trains with lighted cars.)


Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks much.


Lee

Re: Short reverse loops

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

No easy choices here.

1.      Find a way to lengthen the active AR section even if it entails using relays to flip the source of track power of additional track lengths according to selected turnout positions.

2.      With #1 there may be a way to extend the AR section where part of the path is actually mainline track in a non-reversing path. That’s OK as long as the train can run through with the same fixed polarity at each end.

3.      Use entrance and exit detection portals, and the necessary operating rules, as identified by the Loy’s Toys short track reverser scheme. Loy’s Toys is out of business but look for my comments in the files section. It does work when you wire it right and follow the guidelines. There are several other similar methods to do the same thing.

4.      If you do #3, expect passenger car lights to blink or use a means for keep alive of the lights.

5.      Measure the cars and power pick-up points on your passenger train and adjust the position of isolating rail gaps of the AR section so that the power pickup trucks will never be crossing the AR gaps at both ends of the AR section at the same time. The AR controller will be busy, so use an electronic type of AR controller rather than one with slower acting relays.

6.      Race through the AR section and hope that it works without causing a booster trip off.

 

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 1:18 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Short reverse loops

 




Group,  I know that ideally a reverse loop should be longer than the longest train.  But what can one do about a reverse loop that already exists and is shorter than it should be? (I'm talking passenger trains with lighted cars.)

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.


Thanks much.


Lee




Wanted: Keller Onboard SG-1 Signal Controller cards

Dennis C. Henry
 

Although I converted my layout from Bob Keller's Onboard Command Control to multi-ethnic DCC in 2007, I kept the SG-1 signal controller cards by adding an NCE BD20 to each one to detect occupancy. It looks as though I will need another 10-12 Keller SG-1 cards or unbuilt kits to complete my planned trackage (as unlikely as that is to occur.) If anyone has some of these circuit boards that need a good home, I would be happy to make a modest offer after receiving a description of their condition and perhaps a photo. They need not have the optional semaphore or flashing yellow components in place.

Thank you.

Dennis Henry
Brass Car Sides

Source for Pre-wired ON-OFF-ON Mini Toggle Switches

Marvin Pankaskie
 

My soldering skills are beginning to decline, so I am looking to purchase
some pre-wired on-off-on mini toggle switches to be used for manual control
of TortoiseR turnout motors (equipped with HareR controllers). Can anyone
suggest a company or person that makes them for sale?



Thank you kindly,

Marvin Pankaskie

Rochester, NY 14450

Re: Source for Pre-wired ON-OFF-ON Mini Toggle Switches

Charles Brumbelow
 

Found these quickly. If you want more features - spdp, center off, momentary contact, etc - add those to your search criteria. Charles

Look at this on eBay:

http://www.ebay.com/ulk/itm/261988054819

(25) SECURITY ALARM PRE-WIRED On/Off MINI TOGGLE SWITCH - FREE SAME DAY SHIPPING

On Nov 23, 2015, at 6:11 PM, 'Marvin Pankaskie' thealchemist@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:



My soldering skills are beginning to decline, so I am looking to purchase
some pre-wired on-off-on mini toggle switches to be used for manual control
of TortoiseR turnout motors (equipped with HareR controllers). Can anyone
suggest a company or person that makes them for sale?



Thank you kindly,

Marvin Pankaskie

Rochester, NY 14450



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Marvin Pankaskie" <thealchemist@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Source for Pre-wired ON-OFF-ON Mini Toggle Switches

Paul O
 

Marvin, I’d be glad to do it for you at cost. Contact me off-list: pomilian (at) sbcglobal (dot) net. I’m in Michigan.

 

However, a better idea may be to contact a local model RR club for local help.

Check with a Radio Shack or electronics store. They may be able to point you to someone they know that can do electrical work.

 

Good luck,   Paul O

 

Sent: Monday, November 23, 2015 7:12 PM
My soldering skills are beginning to decline, so I am looking to purchase
some pre-wired on-off-on mini toggle switches to be used for manual control
of TortoiseR turnout motors (equipped with HareR controllers). Can anyone
suggest a company or person that makes them for sale?

Thank you kindly,

Marvin Pankaskie

Rochester, NY 14450

Re: Source for Pre-wired ON-OFF-ON Mini Toggle Switches

RONALD ST.LAURENT
 

Hi Marvin,

What you are actually looking for are DPDT on-on switches for Tortoise control.  You do not want the center "off" position as you want to maintain current to the switch to keep tension after it is thrown.  Therefore it is either "on" one way or "on" the other way.

Ron St.Laurent
Lansing Model Railroad Club



On Tuesday, November 24, 2015 11:53 AM, "'Paul O' pomilian@... [WiringForDCC]" wrote:


 
Marvin, I’d be glad to do it for you at cost. Contact me off-list: pomilian (at) sbcglobal (dot) net. I’m in Michigan.
 
However, a better idea may be to contact a local model RR club for local help.
Check with a Radio Shack or electronics store. They may be able to point you to someone they know that can do electrical work.
 
Good luck,   Paul O
 
Sent: Monday, November 23, 2015 7:12 PM
My soldering skills are beginning to decline, so I am looking to purchase
some pre-wired on-off-on mini toggle switches to be used for manual control
of TortoiseR turnout motors (equipped with HareR controllers). Can anyone
suggest a company or person that makes them for sale?

Thank you kindly,

Marvin Pankaskie

Rochester, NY 14450