Date   

Re: DCC Bus Wiring

Mark Gurries
 

I, I am a member of a Model Railway Club, here in Christchurch New Zealand. At long last the club has taken the first step in getting the layout ready for DCC. The layout is a double track continuous run of about 100ft on each track.
I have not seen the track diagram, but you indicated you have 100Ft loops of track. You did not say If the loop of track is stacked on top of each other or a big flat run around the room.

When you run any DCC bus longer than 30Ft, there are some considerations in the wiring.

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#c2

Slitting the bus runs into two 30ft runs in each direction will allow you cover 60ft. This is discussed in the above section.

If you had 100Ft of track run in a double layer with 50ft on the lower level and 50 ft on the upper level, it become possible for a single booster to cover both levels.

But if you had 100ft flat layout, then it would be best advised to break the layout into to two booster districts. One booster cover 1/2 the layout while the 2nd cover the other half.


The question arose as to whether the buses could be continuous or would they have to be terminate so that the boosters fed out in each direct from where they were situated.
On Jul 7, 2015, at 9:11 AM, 'Vollrath, Don' dvollrath@magnetek.com [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Douglas, If your question is “Should the DCC bus be a continuous loop around the layout or be discontinuous ½ way around from the booster location”, you will get a mix of answers and arguments. Obviously the track may/can make a continuous loop without causing problems. I suggest that you make the DCC bus go around the layout in a continuous loop, with the attachment of the booster as a short ‘stub’ feeding the under the layout DCC bus. Add track feeders or ‘droppers’ as necessary around the layout. If you later notice DCC control problems in certain parts of the layout, Add an R-C snubber to the DCC bus supply loop ½ way around from the booster. If that does not resolve the DCC control issue, then cut the DCC bus into two pieces approximately equal length ½ way around the loop and add an R-C snubber to each lose end.
And add two insulated rail joiner above the location where you cut the bus in half so there is a 100% electrical break.

I can say from first hand experience, breaking the loop and wiring solved problems. I had a modular layout with a problem,

However if you address the 100ft bus run problem above, typically you will have broken the track electrically some place anyway negating concern for this issue.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com


Re: DCC Bus Wiring

Richard Sutcliffe
 

The conventional wisdom is to NOT have the buss form a loop. Break it opposite where the booster connects.
Regarding circuit breakers - have the two loops on separate circuit breakers. Perhaps 4 breakers, one on each track North of booster and one on each track of South of booster
On Jul 7, 2015, at 1:55 AM, dougandpenny@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

HI, I am a member of a Model Railway Club, here in Christchurch New Zealand. At long last the club has taken the first step in getting the layout ready for DCC. The layout is a double track continuous run of about 100ft on each track. The question arose as to whether the buses could be continuous or would they have to be terminate so that the boosters fed out in each direct from where they were situated.

You thoughts and ideas on this would be appreciated.


Regards

Douglas

HTH



Re: DCC Bus Wiring

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Douglas, If your question is “Should the DCC bus be a continuous loop around the layout or be discontinuous ½ way around from the booster location”, you will get a mix of answers and arguments. Obviously the track may/can make a continuous loop without causing problems. I suggest that you make the DCC bus go around the layout in a continuous loop, with the attachment of the booster as a short ‘stub’ feeding the under the layout DCC bus. Add track feeders or ‘droppers’ as necessary around the layout. If you later notice DCC control problems in certain parts of the layout, Add an R-C snubber to the DCC bus supply loop ½ way around from the booster. If that does not resolve the DCC control issue, then cut the DCC bus into two pieces approximately equal length ½ way around the loop and add an R-C snubber to each lose end. Note that dividing up the track into insulated electrical blocks for signaling detection or circuit breaker protected power districts is a whole ‘nuther question…. But those sections can still be fed from the same main distribution bus.

 

DonV  

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, July 07, 2015 3:55 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] DCC Bus Wiring

 




HI, I am a member of a Model Railway Club, here in Christchurch New Zealand. At long last the club has taken the first step in getting the layout ready for DCC. The layout is a double track continuous run of about 100ft on each track. The question arose as to whether the buses could be continuous or would they have to be terminate so that the boosters fed out in each direct from where they were situated.

You thoughts and ideas on this would be appreciated.

 

Regards

Douglas





Re: DCC Bus Wiring

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

It is always best to fan out the DCC track wiring bus in both directions from the booster(s) to simply minimize the electrical resistance from booster to train in either direction. Locate a booster somewhere near a central location. Fan out DCC bus supply wires in both directions. It is not overly critical.

 

DonV   

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, July 07, 2015 3:55 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] DCC Bus Wiring

 




HI, I am a member of a Model Railway Club, here in Christchurch New Zealand. At long last the club has taken the first step in getting the layout ready for DCC. The layout is a double track continuous run of about 100ft on each track. The question arose as to whether the buses could be continuous or would they have to be terminate so that the boosters fed out in each direct from where they were situated.

You thoughts and ideas on this would be appreciated.

 

Regards

Douglas





DCC Bus Wiring

dougandpenny@...
 

HI, I am a member of a Model Railway Club, here in Christchurch New Zealand. At long last the club has taken the first step in getting the layout ready for DCC. The layout is a double track continuous run of about 100ft on each track. The question arose as to whether the buses could be continuous or would they have to be terminate so that the boosters fed out in each direct from where they were situated.

You thoughts and ideas on this would be appreciated.


Regards

Douglas


Re: Yard within a Reverse Loop

Mel Israel <mel@...>
 

I have a yard and a transfer/turntable inside a reverse loop all on its own separate circuit. I’m using an NCE dcc system with no issues either at the transfer/turntable or at the reverse loop turnout. I currently have six locos in the yard and on the transfer tracks with no interference. I followed standard reverse loop wiring using an auto reverser for polarity with hand thrown turnouts. Nothing exotic, and it works.


On Jun 23, 2015, at 12:33 PM, 'Glenn' ghazel@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Don has one solution, I may have another.
 
Without a diagram it is hard to visualize what the situation is. You mention switching the yard while the main is still in use. Is the main also the switching lead?
 
Assuming the yard is stub ended enclosed by the loop begin the reverse loop after the last switch and stop it before it rejoins the main track. The switching unit will have to duck out of the way while the through train navigates the reverse loop.
 
Glenn
 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 14:59
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Yard within a Reverse Loop
At the moment I am stumped and needs some advise.  I have a reverse loop that has a yard inside of it.  will I be able to operate my switching unit in the yard at the same time that a thru-freight is traversing the mainline?  I think it is OK, but not really sure.
RicZ

Mel Israel
The Israel Design Group






Re: Yard within a Reverse Loop

Glenn
 

Don has one solution, I may have another.

 

Without a diagram it is hard to visualize what the situation is. You mention switching the yard while the main is still in use. Is the main also the switching lead?

 

Assuming the yard is stub ended enclosed by the loop begin the reverse loop after the last switch and stop it before it rejoins the main track. The switching unit will have to duck out of the way while the through train navigates the reverse loop.

 

Glenn

 


From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 14:59
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Yard within a Reverse Loop

At the moment I am stumped and needs some advise.  I have a reverse loop that has a yard inside of it.  will I be able to operate my switching unit in the yard at the same time that a thru-freight is traversing the mainline?  I think it is OK, but not really sure.

RicZ


Re: Yard within a Reverse Loop

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

With DCC each loco/train is individually controlled by its loco address, no matter where it is located on the layout. So even inside an A-R wired section two or more locos will still respond to their individual ‘throttle’ commands. Fwd/Rev is always Fwd/Rev for each loco. Adding fixed polarity track stubs or double ended sidings/yards to an A-R section simply makes operations more complicated as then there would be more entrance/exit paths to potentially foul up the Auto-Reverser in case of simultaneous movements across the isolating gaps.

 

DonV  

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 2:16 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Yard within a Reverse Loop

 



Thanks, Don.  I was concerned about having more that one train running inside the loop.  Sounds like I was wrong.

 

RicZ





Re: Yard within a Reverse Loop

Eric
 

Thanks, Don.  I was concerned about having more that one train running inside the loop.  Sounds like I was wrong.

RicZ


Re: Yard within a Reverse Loop

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

RicZ,

Just make all the track of the inside-the-loop yard wired as part of the A-R loop. As a through train enters or exits the loop, any loco working in the yard won’t even notice that track polarity flips.

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Monday, June 22, 2015 1:59 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Yard within a Reverse Loop

 




At the moment I am stumped and needs some advise.  I have a reverse loop that has a yard inside of it.  will I be able to operate my switching unit in the yard at the same time that a thru-freight is traversing the mainline?  I think it is OK, but not really sure.

 

RicZ





Yard within a Reverse Loop

Eric
 

At the moment I am stumped and needs some advise.  I have a reverse loop that has a yard inside of it.  will I be able to operate my switching unit in the yard at the same time that a thru-freight is traversing the mainline?  I think it is OK, but not really sure.


RicZ


Re: Shorting mystery

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Are you using 28 or 128 speed step mode? Are you trying to reverse the direction while running at high speed? Do you have aa accel/decel rate set in CVs 3 & 4? What is the sensitivity of the power district CBs? Seemingly unrelated questions, but SOME decoders don’t automatically decel the motor voltage & speed to zero before changing the motor polarity when you push the direction change button… specifically when in the 128 speed step mode. This can cause a big surge in current while attempting to quickly plug-reverse the motor, which can cause a sensitive circuit breaker to trip. This has little to do with the brand/model loco, and more a characteristic of the decoder inside it.

 

DonV

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2015 1:43 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Shorting mystery

 




I have a digitrax ray system with two boosters with four separate power districts  I have several sound equipped locos that operate fine throughout the railroad, however I have one loco (an atlas 600 with a locsound decoder) that runs fine on three power blocks but when I reverse direction in one block a short is detected and the block shuts down.  I'm am at a loss can anyone help thanks Scott hurley





Shorting mystery

mecrr22@...
 

I have a digitrax ray system with two boosters with four separate power districts  I have several sound equipped locos that operate fine throughout the railroad, however I have one loco (an atlas 600 with a locsound decoder) that runs fine on three power blocks but when I reverse direction in one block a short is detected and the block shuts down.  I'm am at a loss can anyone help thanks Scott hurley


Re: Hooking up a CS02 and a PS2012

Mark Gurries
 

Yes, get the 10Amp system if you going to continue to use a lot of old Pittman motors.   But if your converting everything to low current motors, I suspect you can get away with 5amp.

A single 10Amp booster in combination with DCC circuit breakers set for 5 amps will allow you to break your layout into multiple power districts.

One can define power districts as locations where trains work with an operator for a sustained period of time.   Main lines, Yards, Branch Lines, Staging, Engine facilities.


On Jun 15, 2015, at 5:35 AM, lleeblues@... [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@...> wrote:

Thank you Mark for clarifying that point. The PS2012 is a power supply not a booster and I can't stack NCE 5 amp boosters to get 10 amps. I did not give enough information. The Chaffee Branch is in O scale. Most of the locomotives will have low current hi precision can motors (Fahallhaber). Two Pittman 8500 series motors (Will be changed out soon). One Pittman running on layout now.  No more than six locomotives at any one time will be running on layout and four cabs, with eight locomotives in waiting. Average power for a train is two to four units.  No more than twenty-four locos total. All with sound. The layout is basically a folded dog bone for the mainline with a branch line attached. So given what your saying if I run six locos (6x1.5a =9a) I will need a 10 amp booster for the layout. So it would seem that I should just get the NCE 10 amp Pro system and use the Power Cab at the work bench.

Again, Thank You,

L.D.



Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com




Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

I agree with you too Rich. But part of the problem is that the problem is not always as first described. There can be many issues that ‘suddenly’ cause a temporary short as a loco runs over a turnout. Not knowing all the details… which loco?, faulty turnout?, A-R section crossing?, new wiring?, etc., etc…. on the first enquiry triggers a whole lot of possibilities, all which could be a partial or the root cause.

 

I suspect that his item #4 (a faulty test loco) was the real culprit. [Most of us ass-u-med that he would test with several known-to-be good locos.] At least now Marvin is aware of and has verified and/or cleaned up other potential issues.

 

DonV    

 

From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 11:01 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: RE: [WiringForDCC] Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points

 




While I agree with Don that Marvin's feedback notes are thorough, we may never know the cause of the problem that apparently was fixed by one or more of the six corrective actions.  It would be more helpful to future problem solving to take a corrective action and then test the result to see if it resulted in a fix.

 

Rich


---In WiringForDCC@..., <dvollrath@...> wrote :

Thanks for the excellent feedback notes Marvin.
It always helps to explain what you did to diagnose and resolve the issue.
Your notes emphasize that the problem is not always as it was first described.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:05 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points





Thank you to everyone who made suggestions. I am happy to say that my trains and turnouts are running normal now. Here are the steps I have taken:





1. I recently rewired my layout and installed an EB-1 circuit breaker
using factory defaults. I reversed the wiring and set the CVs according to Mark Gurries' suggestions. This in itself might have been the problem.


2. I also checked/rewired some of the track feeders to make sure the
polarity was consistent.


3. I cleaned/re-cleaned the track and turnouts and cleaned all the
locomotive wheels (I use the Woodland Scenic Tidy Track and Roto Cleaner tools), then applied some clear enamel to the frogs as per several suggestions on other discussion boards.


4. I found one of my locomotives had a defective wheel set that was
causing it to derail even on curves. This is the one I was using for testing and will take it to my local store for repair.


5. I have also been re-leveling my layout so that might have caused some
of the track and turnouts to bend just enough to short out. I have inspected them and they seem to be aligned OK now.


6. The temperature and humidity in the basement where I have my layout may
have contributed to some track expansion/contraction. I understand that the Rochester winter played havoc on the local model train club too.





Thanks again for all your suggestions.





Marvin Pankaskie


Rochester, NY 14450






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Marvin Pankaskie" <thealchemist@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links





Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points

redking56@...
 

While I agree with Don that Marvin's feedback notes are thorough, we may never know the cause of the problem that apparently was fixed by one or more of the six corrective actions.  It would be more helpful to future problem solving to take a corrective action and then test the result to see if it resulted in a fix.

Rich

---In WiringForDCC@..., <dvollrath@...> wrote :

Thanks for the excellent feedback notes Marvin.
It always helps to explain what you did to diagnose and resolve the issue.
Your notes emphasize that the problem is not always as it was first described.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:05 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points





Thank you to everyone who made suggestions. I am happy to say that my trains and turnouts are running normal now. Here are the steps I have taken:





1. I recently rewired my layout and installed an EB-1 circuit breaker
using factory defaults. I reversed the wiring and set the CVs according to Mark Gurries' suggestions. This in itself might have been the problem.


2. I also checked/rewired some of the track feeders to make sure the
polarity was consistent.


3. I cleaned/re-cleaned the track and turnouts and cleaned all the
locomotive wheels (I use the Woodland Scenic Tidy Track and Roto Cleaner tools), then applied some clear enamel to the frogs as per several suggestions on other discussion boards.


4. I found one of my locomotives had a defective wheel set that was
causing it to derail even on curves. This is the one I was using for testing and will take it to my local store for repair.


5. I have also been re-leveling my layout so that might have caused some
of the track and turnouts to bend just enough to short out. I have inspected them and they seem to be aligned OK now.


6. The temperature and humidity in the basement where I have my layout may
have contributed to some track expansion/contraction. I understand that the Rochester winter played havoc on the local model train club too.





Thanks again for all your suggestions.





Marvin Pankaskie


Rochester, NY 14450






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Marvin Pankaskie" <thealchemist@...>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Thanks for the excellent feedback notes Marvin.
It always helps to explain what you did to diagnose and resolve the issue.
Your notes emphasize that the problem is not always as it was first described.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WiringForDCC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2015 9:05 AM
To: WiringForDCC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points





Thank you to everyone who made suggestions. I am happy to say that my trains and turnouts are running normal now. Here are the steps I have taken:





1. I recently rewired my layout and installed an EB-1 circuit breaker
using factory defaults. I reversed the wiring and set the CVs according to Mark Gurries' suggestions. This in itself might have been the problem.


2. I also checked/rewired some of the track feeders to make sure the
polarity was consistent.


3. I cleaned/re-cleaned the track and turnouts and cleaned all the
locomotive wheels (I use the Woodland Scenic Tidy Track and Roto Cleaner tools), then applied some clear enamel to the frogs as per several suggestions on other discussion boards.


4. I found one of my locomotives had a defective wheel set that was
causing it to derail even on curves. This is the one I was using for testing and will take it to my local store for repair.


5. I have also been re-leveling my layout so that might have caused some
of the track and turnouts to bend just enough to short out. I have inspected them and they seem to be aligned OK now.


6. The temperature and humidity in the basement where I have my layout may
have contributed to some track expansion/contraction. I understand that the Rochester winter played havoc on the local model train club too.





Thanks again for all your suggestions.





Marvin Pankaskie


Rochester, NY 14450






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




------------------------------------
Posted by: "Marvin Pankaskie" <thealchemist@rochester.rr.com>
------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Short in Atlas Turnout Frog/Points

Marvin Pankaskie
 

Thank you to everyone who made suggestions. I am happy to say that my trains
and turnouts are running normal now. Here are the steps I have taken:





1. I recently rewired my layout and installed an EB-1 circuit breaker
using factory defaults. I reversed the wiring and set the CVs according to
Mark Gurries' suggestions. This in itself might have been the problem.


2. I also checked/rewired some of the track feeders to make sure the
polarity was consistent.


3. I cleaned/re-cleaned the track and turnouts and cleaned all the
locomotive wheels (I use the Woodland Scenic Tidy Track and Roto Cleaner
tools), then applied some clear enamel to the frogs as per several
suggestions on other discussion boards.


4. I found one of my locomotives had a defective wheel set that was
causing it to derail even on curves. This is the one I was using for testing
and will take it to my local store for repair.


5. I have also been re-leveling my layout so that might have caused some
of the track and turnouts to bend just enough to short out. I have inspected
them and they seem to be aligned OK now.


6. The temperature and humidity in the basement where I have my layout may
have contributed to some track expansion/contraction. I understand that the
Rochester winter played havoc on the local model train club too.





Thanks again for all your suggestions.





Marvin Pankaskie


Rochester, NY 14450


Re: Hooking up a CS02 and a PS2012

Leonard Davis
 

Thank you Mark for clarifying that point. The PS2012 is a power supply not a booster and I can't stack NCE 5 amp boosters to get 10 amps. I did not give enough information. The Chaffee Branch is in O scale. Most of the locomotives will have low current hi precision can motors (Fahallhaber). Two Pittman 8500 series motors (Will be changed out soon). One Pittman running on layout now.  No more than six locomotives at any one time will be running on layout and four cabs, with eight locomotives in waiting. Average power for a train is two to four units.  No more than twenty-four locos total. All with sound. The layout is basically a folded dog bone for the mainline with a branch line attached. So given what your saying if I run six locos (6x1.5a =9a) I will need a 10 amp booster for the layout. So it would seem that I should just get the NCE 10 amp Pro system and use the Power Cab at the work bench.

Again, Thank You,

L.D.



Re: Hooking up a CS02 and a PS2012

Mark Gurries
 

On Jun 14, 2015, at 12:22 PM, lleeblues@yahoo.com [WiringForDCC] <WiringForDCC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

I am sure this has been discussed at length. I looked for a search category but could not fine one. I am considering using a NCE CS02 with a Digtrax PS2012 power transformer.
Nope, not a common question at all as stated.

The NCE CS02 is a command station only. No booster output (not track connection). Using the PS2012 is way overkill for the CS02 and it will still not allow you to run any trains.

Do you have any Digitrax boosters? You can use the NCE CS02 to drive Digitrax booster and use the Digitrax PS2012 as the power supply for those boosters.

Given all NCE DCC systems are being supplied with their own NCE power supplies going forward, the PS2012 will not be of any use to the NCE system.

Originally I was considering a NCE SB-5 and a DB-5. There is only $25.00 dollars between the two set-ups.
The SB5 is a 5Amp booster AND a PowerCab command station in a small box. It is the expansion system for the Entry Level PowerCab system. By

The DB5 is the expansion booster of the SB5. It does not contain a command station.

The SB5 does not contain a programming track function. The PowerCab system does.

Normally you buy a PowerCab system and if you need more cabs and/or higher power, you purchase the SB5 for it.
The combination of PowerCab + SB5 gives you:

1) 5Amp system
2) 6 Cab operation,
3) Programming Track capability (via the PowerCab)
4) PowerCab walkaround capability like any other cab.

The following links will help you sort out all the NCE System capabilities.

https://sites.google.com/site/markgurries/home/nce-info/nce-dcc-systems

https://sites.google.com/site/markgurries/home/nce-info/nce-dcc-systems/technical-spec-comparisons

I only need six cabs and ten amps max but for only twenty-five dollars more I get full capability from NCE and twenty amps of power
DCC Power is deceptive thing to figure out. There are two parts to it.

A) How Much Power do you need?

The current you need to run a layout does not depend on how many engines you have on the layout. Engines that are not moving, do not consume any current of any consequence.

Only engines that are moving consume current. So how many amps you need will depend on the following.

1) How many trains will be running on the layout at the same time.
2) What scale are you in.
3) How many engines will belong to a typical moving train.

B) How do you add power to the layout?

Booster are not wired in parallel. Buying two 5Amp booster does NOT give you 10 Amps. It simply give you two different "power districts" on the layout with each having a maximum of 5 amps. Power Districts are a group of tracks that are wired together to a common booster or DCC circuit breaker.

The only way to get 10Amps is to buy a 10Amp booster. But 10Amp booster are only needed for O scale or larger gauge.

To figure out how many booster power you need, you first have to answer how much power do you need in question 1 above.

You may want to do some reading here:

https://sites.google.com/site/markgurries/home/nmra-dcc-clinic-pdf-files

Start with the DCC basics presentation. It can help you sort out all the common DCC questions.

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

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