Date   
Re: switches and lights

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Not directly, if I understand your question correctly.
The Atlas Snap Switches (the turnout) have a metal but non-powered frog.
You can power the frog by using external microswitches or relays, one of which is also called an Atlas Snap-Switch. This device is a twin coil mechanical latching relay that can be wired in parallel with the Atlas twin coil switch machine that operates the turnout. The contacts of this relay can then be used to power the frog at the right polarity or operate a signal circuit. Once you have that, look at Allan's wiring aids at http://www.wiringfordcc.com/signaling.htm.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: Les Crawford [mailto:cei300@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 24, 2005 8:25 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] switches and lights




Good Morning, I am new to this list and my question is:

Is it possible using Atlas snap switches and DCC, to connect a two
light signal to it, to show red or green depending on which way the
switch is, without having to do it manually? Thank you for any help.

Les
Canadian Eastern Inland RR

Re: Digest Number 4

Ulrich Albrecht <albreuf@...>
 

Paul,

One of the statements I often heard about conversion from DC to DCC is
that if everything works under DC, just hook up a DCC booster, and things
will work. In my opinion, this has to be taken with a grain of salt, and
here are my reasons:

a) DC uses much lower current loads than DCC. I you use a booster like
Digitrax DB150 or DCS100, the maximum output is 5A, while a good power
pack in DC may deliver 2A. You may end up overloading your DC wiring with
a DCC-booster. I rewired my lauout completely.

b) DC is much less sensitive to shorts than DCC. This applies particular
to turnouts. A metal whell that short circuits a turnout may not be
noticed by the DC powerpack due to the short duration of the short, but it
will trigger the booster.

My sugestion, rewire the whole thing unless you have a AVG#18 power bus
(actually I would use AVG# 14 or lower when rewiring). The #18 is o.k.
unless your loads will exceed 3A, in this case it will cause a voltage
drop. Also make sure that all your wheels are in gauge, so that they do
not touch parts of switches which are connected to opposite outputs of the
booster. As far as Peco turnouts are concerned, I have no experience, but
if you do not have a short under DC, your set-up should work except for
b).

Ulrich

--- In WiringForDCC@..., sawlumber@a... wrote:
I have an existing layout. I'm getting ready to change over to
DCC. I have
Electrofrog Peco turnouts. I have heard that if you put
insulators on the
frog rails and the stock rails of the switch, I won't have to
tear them out
and re-wire them? Any ideas?

Thanks
Paul


Re: Digest Number 4

Dale Gloer
 

Paul,

as I said in my previous post, if your layout runs correctly on DC
then it will run correctly on DCC.

However, as Ulrich has pointed out, it is easy to ignore or not
notice little glitches that occur on DC that will cause DCC to shut
down. Those little hesitations in a switch with DC could be
temporary shorts that will cause the DCC system to shutdown and stop
all trains. So be critical when evaluating how your layout performs
on DC before you can say that it functions correctly. Go ahead and
just connect up your DCC system but don't be surprised if your
properly operating DC layout turns out to have some glitches that
will be exposed by DCC.

Regarding cutting up switches. This is heresey on Allan's forum -
BUT - you don't need to perform any of the modifications just
because you are switching to DCC. And all the modifications
actually apply to DC as well. The modifications describe how to
make switches trouble free forever. On my previous layout, I used
Peco Electrofrog swithces and did not do any of the mods. On both
DC and DCC I had the usual problems of poor contact, etc. when
depending on point rails to make contact with stock rails for power.
On my new layout I have made the mods on all switches as I installed
them.

Regarding Ulrich's comments on wiring. Rewiring is a good idea
following the priciples that are also given by Allan and others.
however, to get started, you probably don't need to. Start running
DCC and if you find trouble spots, address those first and then
develop a plan to do the wiring conversion in stages so you can keep
your railroad running and upgrade it at the same time. It can be
done.

Dale.


--- In WiringForDCC@..., Ulrich Albrecht <albreuf@m...>
wrote:
Paul,

One of the statements I often heard about conversion from DC to
DCC is
that if everything works under DC, just hook up a DCC booster, and
things
will work. In my opinion, this has to be taken with a grain of
salt, and
here are my reasons:

a) DC uses much lower current loads than DCC. I you use a booster
like
Digitrax DB150 or DCS100, the maximum output is 5A, while a good
power
pack in DC may deliver 2A. You may end up overloading your DC
wiring with
a DCC-booster. I rewired my lauout completely.

b) DC is much less sensitive to shorts than DCC. This applies
particular
to turnouts. A metal whell that short circuits a turnout may not be
noticed by the DC powerpack due to the short duration of the
short, but it
will trigger the booster.

My sugestion, rewire the whole thing unless you have a AVG#18
power bus
(actually I would use AVG# 14 or lower when rewiring). The #18 is
o.k.
unless your loads will exceed 3A, in this case it will cause a
voltage
drop. Also make sure that all your wheels are in gauge, so that
they do
not touch parts of switches which are connected to opposite
outputs of the
booster. As far as Peco turnouts are concerned, I have no
experience, but
if you do not have a short under DC, your set-up should work
except for
b).

Ulrich

Re: Using Peco Electrofrog turnouts

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Its time again to remind everyone it is your railroad. As long as
it works, you can do what you want to. What I try to give in my
website is bulletproof advice that will definitely work for everyone.

You don't have to cut your turnouts if you don't want to. However,
don't half follow the advice - meaning don't add any jumpers if you
don't make the cuts. A short will develop in the case of the Peco
Electrofrog.

One other thing I want to make sure I mention is that if you are
power routing any sidings, you may want to consider powering them
directly from a DCC bus. As previously mentioned about DCC and DC
currents, you may run into problems. It may work fine for several
years and then start giving you problems. You keep mentioning
putting insulated joiners on your turnout so I presume that you will
not be power routing your sidings. So this caution is aimed at
someone else who may come along and read this posting.

Definitely you want to make sure you are using at least 18 AWG bus
wiring.

And finally, the most important thing you should do when converting
a DC layout to DCC is give the ENTIRE layout the short test. Hook
up your booster and go around the layout with a quater or a pair of
pliers and short the track. Make sure your booster trips
immediately. Flip every turnout and test again. If your booster
doesn't trip, either your wiring is inadequate or your power routing
of your turnouts is inadequate. If you are power routing your
turnouts using your turnout's points, add some sort of switch or
relay to do your power routing for you.

Wiring a Shinahora Double Crossover for DCC

barryleejohnson <johnson4@...>
 

Can any one help here. I have several of this crossovers and
understand that they can be a problem with shorting on DCC if the
wiring is not corrected. Are there any artilces I can obtain or can
anyone point me in the right direction. I have looked at the double
slip but they seem to be differently laid out.

BarryJ

Re: Wiring a Shinahora Double Crossover for DCC

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Keep both main tracks at the same polarity. [i.e - Wire both North rails to be at the same polarity. Don't make a figure 8 loop crossing through the crossover.]
Throw all 4 turnouts to be in the same position to avoid momentary shorts at the frogs.
No track cuts or special wiring is required.

For further enhancement, add continuity jumpers around point rail swivels and add microswitches (or a latching relay) to your switch machines to help electrify the point rails in parallel with the Shinohara built in contacts at the rail points. Be sure that the microswitches 'click' with the throw bar near mid position.
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: barryleejohnson [mailto:johnson4@...]
Sent: Monday, March 28, 2005 1:02 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Wiring a Shinahora Double Crossover for DCC




Can any one help here. I have several of this crossovers and
understand that they can be a problem with shorting on DCC if the
wiring is not corrected. Are there any artilces I can obtain or can
anyone point me in the right direction. I have looked at the double
slip but they seem to be differently laid out.

BarryJ





http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Wiring a Shinahora Double Crossover for DCC

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Here's a drawing of the double crossover that shows what Don is
talking about.

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_walthers_old.htm#a2

Allan

Rewiring an existing layout for DCC

Marcus Ammann
 

Hi Paul

I agree with what Dale has said and all that Allan with his Wiring
for DCC site suggests, Ulrich has stated what I have termed, "too
many negatives to go to DCC" and has scared off many a potential
DCCer.

A lot of home layouts will not need 2, 3 etc boosters and will never
reach the full potential of one booster's designed current limit.
They will only run one to say 4 or 5 locos, and that would be with a
few operators.

I would encourage any modeller contemplating going to DCC to reap the
rewards that are available in DCC, to JUST connect a DCC system to
his layout, with one proviso, use a 12 volt "1156" or similar lamp in
series with one track feeder, but the booster will never cut out with
a short, the lamp illuminates and gives a "very" visual warning. This
will protect the layouts wiring and limit the total number of locos
on the track running at one time, but at least a single opertor will
be happily operating with DCC and enjoying all the new found features
that DCC brings with the minimum effort and all done in a few hours
and that includes fitting a decoder.

A DCC equipped loco does not draw anymore current than its dc
equivalent, maybe a few milliamps more to power the electronics but
thats all.

I have over 100 Peco turnouts in code 100 and have not converted any
of them to "DCC Friendly". I would only convert installed turnouts if
they are causing a problem, and only after I have done things like
improve track alignment and correct any wheel sets that are out of
gauge, this will correct most problems. I have progressively changed
my layout as the need arises and have used all the information that
Allan and others have provided on his web site, to answer my own
questions and help me understand the "wiring problems".

With my recommendation, you will address a problem when it presents
itself, otherwise don't worry yourself about some things that never
happen, but at least you are running in DCC and not thinking about
how to modify all your turnouts and rewiring your layout and never
getting to DCC. At a later stage you will probably rewire sections or
the whole of you layout.

If starting from scatch, then yes, wire system as it suggested in
these pages, modify turnouts prior to fitting and wire in power zones.

There is NO substitute for good wiring practices.

Marcus




--- In WiringForDCC@..., Ulrich Albrecht <albreuf@m...>
wrote:
Paul,

One of the statements I often heard about conversion from DC to DCC
is
that if everything works under DC, just hook up a DCC booster, and
things
will work. In my opinion, this has to be taken with a grain of
salt, and
here are my reasons:

a) DC uses much lower current loads than DCC. I you use a booster
like
Digitrax DB150 or DCS100, the maximum output is 5A, while a good
power
pack in DC may deliver 2A. You may end up overloading your DC
wiring with
a DCC-booster. I rewired my lauout completely.

b) DC is much less sensitive to shorts than DCC. This applies
particular
to turnouts. A metal whell that short circuits a turnout may not be
noticed by the DC powerpack due to the short duration of the short,
but it
will trigger the booster.

My sugestion, rewire the whole thing unless you have a AVG#18 power
bus
(actually I would use AVG# 14 or lower when rewiring). The #18 is
o.k.
unless your loads will exceed 3A, in this case it will cause a
voltage
drop. Also make sure that all your wheels are in gauge, so that
they do
not touch parts of switches which are connected to opposite outputs
of the
booster. As far as Peco turnouts are concerned, I have no
experience, but
if you do not have a short under DC, your set-up should work except
for
b).

Ulrich


--- In WiringForDCC@..., sawlumber@a... wrote:
I have an existing layout. I'm getting ready to change over
to
DCC. I have
Electrofrog Peco turnouts. I have heard that if you put
insulators on the
frog rails and the stock rails of the switch, I won't have to
tear them out
and re-wire them? Any ideas?

Thanks
Paul


Re: Digest Number 8

Ulrich Albrecht <albreuf@...>
 

I did not want to scare anyone off DCC, but would actually encourage
everyone to take this route. I would only recommend that everything is
working fine under DC so that the conversion experience does not become a
pain. All too often, one blames DCC for problems that are actually old
DC-problems.

My main concern is that the wiring needs to be able to ahndle the loads.
Yes locos use the same current under DCC as under DC, but on a DC layout
running six engines this load is distributed between 3-4 power packs,
while under DCC all may go through one wire at a certain point. This may
result in poor performance due to voltage drop or overheating of the wire.

Ulrich

On 31 Mar 2005 WiringForDCC@... wrote:


There is 1 message in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Rewiring an existing layout for DCC
From: "Marcus Ammann" <mammann@...>


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 31 Mar 2005 00:02:05 -0000
From: "Marcus Ammann" <mammann@...>
Subject: Rewiring an existing layout for DCC


Hi Paul

I agree with what Dale has said and all that Allan with his Wiring
for DCC site suggests, Ulrich has stated what I have termed, "too
many negatives to go to DCC" and has scared off many a potential
DCCer.

A lot of home layouts will not need 2, 3 etc boosters and will never
reach the full potential of one booster's designed current limit.
They will only run one to say 4 or 5 locos, and that would be with a
few operators.

I would encourage any modeller contemplating going to DCC to reap the
rewards that are available in DCC, to JUST connect a DCC system to
his layout, with one proviso, use a 12 volt "1156" or similar lamp in
series with one track feeder, but the booster will never cut out with
a short, the lamp illuminates and gives a "very" visual warning. This
will protect the layouts wiring and limit the total number of locos
on the track running at one time, but at least a single opertor will
be happily operating with DCC and enjoying all the new found features
that DCC brings with the minimum effort and all done in a few hours
and that includes fitting a decoder.

A DCC equipped loco does not draw anymore current than its dc
equivalent, maybe a few milliamps more to power the electronics but
thats all.

I have over 100 Peco turnouts in code 100 and have not converted any
of them to "DCC Friendly". I would only convert installed turnouts if
they are causing a problem, and only after I have done things like
improve track alignment and correct any wheel sets that are out of
gauge, this will correct most problems. I have progressively changed
my layout as the need arises and have used all the information that
Allan and others have provided on his web site, to answer my own
questions and help me understand the "wiring problems".

With my recommendation, you will address a problem when it presents
itself, otherwise don't worry yourself about some things that never
happen, but at least you are running in DCC and not thinking about
how to modify all your turnouts and rewiring your layout and never
getting to DCC. At a later stage you will probably rewire sections or
the whole of you layout.

If starting from scatch, then yes, wire system as it suggested in
these pages, modify turnouts prior to fitting and wire in power zones.

There is NO substitute for good wiring practices.

Marcus




--- In WiringForDCC@..., Ulrich Albrecht <albreuf@m...>
wrote:
Paul,

One of the statements I often heard about conversion from DC to DCC
is
that if everything works under DC, just hook up a DCC booster, and
things
will work. In my opinion, this has to be taken with a grain of
salt, and
here are my reasons:

a) DC uses much lower current loads than DCC. I you use a booster
like
Digitrax DB150 or DCS100, the maximum output is 5A, while a good
power
pack in DC may deliver 2A. You may end up overloading your DC
wiring with
a DCC-booster. I rewired my lauout completely.

b) DC is much less sensitive to shorts than DCC. This applies
particular
to turnouts. A metal whell that short circuits a turnout may not be
noticed by the DC powerpack due to the short duration of the short,
but it
will trigger the booster.

My sugestion, rewire the whole thing unless you have a AVG#18 power
bus
(actually I would use AVG# 14 or lower when rewiring). The #18 is
o.k.
unless your loads will exceed 3A, in this case it will cause a
voltage
drop. Also make sure that all your wheels are in gauge, so that
they do
not touch parts of switches which are connected to opposite outputs
of the
booster. As far as Peco turnouts are concerned, I have no
experience, but
if you do not have a short under DC, your set-up should work except
for
b).

Ulrich


--- In WiringForDCC@..., sawlumber@a... wrote:
I have an existing layout. I'm getting ready to change over
to
DCC. I have
Electrofrog Peco turnouts. I have heard that if you put
insulators on the
frog rails and the stock rails of the switch, I won't have to
tear them out
and re-wire them? Any ideas?

Thanks
Paul






________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links




------------------------------------------------------------------------



Re: Wiring a Shinahora Double Crossover for DCC

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

A couple more comments
1. Note the close proximity of rails of opposite polarity near the frog points. This is where extra wide wheel treads and out of gauge wheel sets may contact both rails. Also there are rail-rail bonding ties at the bottom of the wheel flange trench at the frog. these are supposed to be burried into the plastic but on 2 of my samples are actually exposed. Older wheel sets with oversized flanges can touch the wrong rail polarity while rolling through.
2. Making the the switch DCC friendly includes making the 'unused' point rail the same polarity as the adjacent stock rail. In most cases including this one, it requires cutting gaps in the closure rails just before they reach the frog as Allan has shown. But this becomes an 'unfriendly' DCC problem only when using older oversized or out of gauge wheels or only when there is an actual derailment. Good running wheel sets should not be brushing their backside against the other point rail when it is open. If you are willing to gamble on that, then you don't have to cut any rail gaps. Just let both point rails become the same polarity as the frog, as originally designed.
3. The original Shinohara design uses a copper strap at the points as a sliding switch to selectively power the point rails and frog to the right stock rail polarity as each switch is thrown. This works OK but has all the potenital of poor electrical contact due to oxidation, dirt, etc. Ditto for where the point rails swivel. One needs to add continuity jumpers around the swivel point to fix that particular problem. [Making the swivel joint with rail joiner-like clips is better than rivets, but still subject to ageing problems.] Adding an external electrical switch to provide a better electrical connection to point and closure rails is necessary to avoid the problems of a dirty or work copper contact at the rail points. JMNust make sure that the electrical switch transfers power while neither point contact is touching.
4. If you add the external supplementry switch as in #3, and are willing to live with or eliminate the problem of #2, You don't need to cut any new rail gaps. The problem of the exposed built in bonding wire being exposed of #1 can be avoided by simply throwing all four throwbars to be in the same position at the same time. Easy to do if you are using 4 tortiose machines.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: wirefordcc [mailto:wire4dcc_admin@...]
Sent: Monday, March 28, 2005 7:11 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Wiring a Shinahora Double Crossover for DCC




Here's a drawing of the double crossover that shows what Don is
talking about.

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_walthers_old.htm#a2

Allan






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

New file uploaded to WiringForDCC

WiringForDCC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the WiringForDCC
group.

File : /ACR Plan 20050402b - DCC.pdf
Uploaded by : camsysca <smithbr@...>
Description : Basement Layout for DCC Distribution discussion

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WiringForDCC/files/ACR%20Plan%2020050402b%20-%20DCC.pdf

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/help/us/groups/files

Regards,

camsysca <smithbr@...>

DCC Distribution comments, please

Blair & Rasa
 

I have a fairly ambitious layout a-building, and it's time I considered DCC
power distribution. I have posted a PDF to the files section of this group,
named "ACR 20040402b DCC.pdf", to give you an idea of dimensions,
constraints, etc. What I'm looking for is creative ideas for power
distribution within the room, presuming a single level layout. I'm trying
to keep busses to a max of 30' from a DCS100, but that rule isn't firm. I
believe the room could be served by two DCS100 (5A), located at A and B, in
terms of my expected traffic loading - up to 15 HO diesels running at any
one time, with another 30 in staging tracks). Each DCS100 will feed at
least one PM42. However, I'm concerned about total feed length around the
LHS. I may be better served with three DCS100, one each at A, D, and E.
(the link shown from A to B represents the availability of a below-floor
duct, but to extend power buss across this is silly - total length consumed
is about 12', to what end?)
I'm sure I haven't given enough info, but please just ask away.

Blair Smith

-----Original Message-----
From: Ulrich Albrecht [mailto:albreuf@...]
Sent: March 31, 2005 12:49
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Digest Number 8



I did not want to scare anyone off DCC, but would actually encourage
everyone to take this route. I would only recommend that everything is
working fine under DC so that the conversion experience does not become a
pain. All too often, one blames DCC for problems that are actually old
DC-problems.

My main concern is that the wiring needs to be able to ahndle the loads.
Yes locos use the same current under DCC as under DC, but on a DC layout
running six engines this load is distributed between 3-4 power packs,
while under DCC all may go through one wire at a certain point. This may
result in poor performance due to voltage drop or overheating of the wire.

Ulrich

On 31 Mar 2005 WiringForDCC@... wrote:


There is 1 message in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Rewiring an existing layout for DCC
From: "Marcus Ammann" <mammann@...>


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 31 Mar 2005 00:02:05 -0000
From: "Marcus Ammann" <mammann@...>
Subject: Rewiring an existing layout for DCC


Hi Paul

I agree with what Dale has said and all that Allan with his Wiring
for DCC site suggests, Ulrich has stated what I have termed, "too
many negatives to go to DCC" and has scared off many a potential
DCCer.

A lot of home layouts will not need 2, 3 etc boosters and will never
reach the full potential of one booster's designed current limit.
They will only run one to say 4 or 5 locos, and that would be with a
few operators.

I would encourage any modeller contemplating going to DCC to reap the
rewards that are available in DCC, to JUST connect a DCC system to
his layout, with one proviso, use a 12 volt "1156" or similar lamp in
series with one track feeder, but the booster will never cut out with
a short, the lamp illuminates and gives a "very" visual warning. This
will protect the layouts wiring and limit the total number of locos
on the track running at one time, but at least a single opertor will
be happily operating with DCC and enjoying all the new found features
that DCC brings with the minimum effort and all done in a few hours
and that includes fitting a decoder.

A DCC equipped loco does not draw anymore current than its dc
equivalent, maybe a few milliamps more to power the electronics but
thats all.

I have over 100 Peco turnouts in code 100 and have not converted any
of them to "DCC Friendly". I would only convert installed turnouts if
they are causing a problem, and only after I have done things like
improve track alignment and correct any wheel sets that are out of
gauge, this will correct most problems. I have progressively changed
my layout as the need arises and have used all the information that
Allan and others have provided on his web site, to answer my own
questions and help me understand the "wiring problems".

With my recommendation, you will address a problem when it presents
itself, otherwise don't worry yourself about some things that never
happen, but at least you are running in DCC and not thinking about
how to modify all your turnouts and rewiring your layout and never
getting to DCC. At a later stage you will probably rewire sections or
the whole of you layout.

If starting from scatch, then yes, wire system as it suggested in
these pages, modify turnouts prior to fitting and wire in power zones.

There is NO substitute for good wiring practices.

Marcus




--- In WiringForDCC@..., Ulrich Albrecht <albreuf@m...>
wrote:
Paul,

One of the statements I often heard about conversion from DC to DCC
is
that if everything works under DC, just hook up a DCC booster, and
things
will work. In my opinion, this has to be taken with a grain of
salt, and
here are my reasons:

a) DC uses much lower current loads than DCC. I you use a booster
like
Digitrax DB150 or DCS100, the maximum output is 5A, while a good
power
pack in DC may deliver 2A. You may end up overloading your DC
wiring with
a DCC-booster. I rewired my lauout completely.

b) DC is much less sensitive to shorts than DCC. This applies
particular
to turnouts. A metal whell that short circuits a turnout may not be
noticed by the DC powerpack due to the short duration of the short,
but it
will trigger the booster.

My sugestion, rewire the whole thing unless you have a AVG#18 power
bus
(actually I would use AVG# 14 or lower when rewiring). The #18 is
o.k.
unless your loads will exceed 3A, in this case it will cause a
voltage
drop. Also make sure that all your wheels are in gauge, so that
they do
not touch parts of switches which are connected to opposite outputs
of the
booster. As far as Peco turnouts are concerned, I have no
experience, but
if you do not have a short under DC, your set-up should work except
for
b).

Ulrich


--- In WiringForDCC@..., sawlumber@a... wrote:
I have an existing layout. I'm getting ready to change over
to
DCC. I have
Electrofrog Peco turnouts. I have heard that if you put
insulators on the
frog rails and the stock rails of the switch, I won't have to
tear them out
and re-wire them? Any ideas?

Thanks
Paul






________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


http://www.WiringForDCC.com
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links




------------------------------------------------------------------------





http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: DCC Distribution comments, please

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Blair,

Thanks for posting the detailed drawing. I will think about your
layout some more over the weekend. I'm sure some of the other people
will have a few comments for you. Here are a few of my initial
thoughts.

You seem to have a good grasp of the "30' rule," so I will assume you
are familar with my website.

Have you considered punching a hole in the wall to run your bus
through it? That would be one way to shorten one of your buses.

In deciding where your boosters will go, you need to think about the
loading on the boosters. Are you likely to have one or more places on
your layout that will have a concentration of running locos? That may
not change any of your plans, but it is something you need to
consider. I suspect you will need a DCS100 and 2 boosters (or
DCS100's operating in booster-only mode).

Re: DCC Distribution comments, please

Blair & Rasa
 

Allan
Yes, I'm familiar with your website. The hole in the wall for wire is
possible, but as the offending wall is 10" concrete block, I'll only do it
if it saves me significant effort in wiring. As an electronics tech, the
wiring doesn't intimidate me, I just want to check my ideas against the
thoughts of those who have done this more than I have.

As for the DCS100 vs Booster debate, money is a concern as it is for most,
but I also see advantages to having equipment commonality, as opposed to
multiple different items, so it's a tradeoff.

I should give you some data about the layout as it is presently envisaged;
I'll post a schematic later this PM.
Thanks
Blair Smith

question about MRC auto reverse unit........

trainman2435 <trainman2435@...>
 

hello everyone, im new here and i have a question. i purchased a MRC
AD520 auto reverse unit about 6 or 8 months ago. since then i have
gotten my layout ready and need to install it. i am useing the new
Prodigy Advance DCC system and i need to control a reverse loop. the
unit itself has two yellow wires and two red wires. can someone tell
me where these hook to? i have lost the directions that came with the
AD520 since i bought it. any information is greatly appreciated.
thanks!
steve

Re: question about MRC auto reverse unit........

Marcus Ammann
 

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "trainman2435" <trainman2435@y...>
wrote:

hello everyone, im new here and i have a question. i purchased a MRC
AD520 auto reverse unit about 6 or 8 months ago. since then i have
gotten my layout ready and need to install it. i am useing the new
Prodigy Advance DCC system and i need to control a reverse loop. the
unit itself has two yellow wires and two red wires. can someone tell
me where these hook to? i have lost the directions that came with the
AD520 since i bought it. any information is greatly appreciated.
thanks!
steve
Steve

Connect the two red wires of the AD520 to your DCC output from your
booster and the two yellow wires to the section of track for the
reverse loop. You must double gap the track at the isolation points.

If the reverse loop uses the same turnout for entry/exit you can use a
switch/microswitch that is operated when the turnout is operated, thus
saving the use of the AD520 for something else like a return loop, a
wye or a turntable.

The turnout has to be operated to turn a train, so this
same "operation" can operate a switch/microswitch/relay etc.

Marcus

Re: DCC Distribution comments, please

Blair & Rasa
 

Allan, others
Schema posted last night, and previous file moved (one note - the schema
posted uses letters to designate connections; they are not related to the
letters used on the floor plan). In the schema, be advised that the yards
depicted vary from 8 to 12 tracks in width. The schema also doesn't show a
couple of important details; the CNR and CPR will either both have, or both
have access to, a reversing loop to allow trains in staging to be turned for
reuse in the same, or subsequent, sessions. The loops will be embedded in
the peninsula that starts at E. In addition, the future existence of a
helix at D and engine turning Y tracks at A and B were omitted.

Further thoughts/data:
I will be wiring the DCC bus with 14/2 Romex, stripped and twisted; each run
from the DCS100 will either run direct to the layout uninterrupted, or pass
through a PM42 or equivalent power distribution centre; other than a few
T-joints, which can have the main bus uninterrupted, there will be no breaks
or other connections to introduce higher impedance in the busses. However,
I am likely to have feeder stretches up to about 24" (actually 48" of wire).
Feeders will run to every piece of track and switch, I'm not fond of
soldering joiners unless I really need to for physical alignment.

Considering all of the above, I think my best bet is to locate boosters at
D(feeds BC, helix) & E (feeds BFG) , with the command station to the right
of A (feeding left of A thru to H). The duct (A-B) will be used to feed
loconet signals from A to B to D/E, but not a DCC bus. Of the three
locations, A will be the most accessible, so it is a good spot to put UR91,
DCS100.

Does anyone have any experience with the PS2012 from Digitrax? It looks
good, but I wonder about, in my situation, running a long DC bus from A to D
and E to get the power to these boosters. It may make a lot more sense to
have localized DC supplies than to buss that around the layout.

Turning to the loconet topic, the layout will be DT400R/UT4 operated, with
perhaps a Zephyr for one or more of the yards (a friend's layout is Zephyr
controlled, and he would like to utilize it on my layout so his young
daughters can participate. my guess is once they use a UT4, this issue will
go away, but...) In order to control the yards, it would seem to me that I
want loconet plugs, at a minimum, at each yard. However, are there other
good reasons for wanting them along the right-of-way? I can't see it. I
suppose one long run around the layout from yard to yard could always be
broken into later to install UP5 panels, but if I can, I'd like to avoid
that.

Funny, the process of writing this down for the list and thinking it
through leaves me with a workable plan, I think. If anyone can see
pitfalls, or better approaches, please fire away .
Regards
Blair Smith

IHC Cab Forward

gregpcrd <gregpcrd@...>
 

Anyone out there ever wire a IHC Cab Forward for DCC? I am lost even
figuring how to get it open.

Re: DCC Distribution comments, please

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Blair,

Regarding PS2012: I prefer to have a power source with each
booster/command station. Given the cost of individual power sources
and the PS2012, there really isn't a cost advantage either way. The
PS20212 surprises me as a product because I thought Digitrax was one
of the manufacturers that advised against using a common power source
for their boosters. Note that the Digitrax command station and
boosters can be powered by AC sources. DC is not required.

Loconet plugs: The only reason to have more Loconet plugs is if
someone comes over to operate that doesn't have wireless capability.

Loconet: There is no practical restriction as to how long your
Loconet can be. You can run it anywhere, anyway you want to.

Feeder length: Feeder lengths of 24" is not advised, but if you can
pass the short test (see http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track.htm#a16)
you can do it. You might want to consider branching off your main bus
with more 14 AWG sub buses to get shorter feeder lenghts.

question about bus lines and reverse loop.....

trainman2435 <trainman2435@...>
 

hello everyone, i was reading allans site and i noticed he says (Do
not connect your main bus to your reversing section in any way. Your
reversing section must only be connected to your reverse section
controller, reversing relay, or reversing switch.) what exactly does
this mean? how can i hook up my reverse loop to my MRC AD520 without
attaching anything to my main bus? im really confused, can someone
explain this to me please? thanks!
steve