Date   
Converting Walthers/Shinohara Turnouts to DCC

Annette and Dante Fuligni
 

I have just begun to explore the methods proposed by Allan Gartner for the referenced conversion. I have not yet attempted a conversion but have a question: Rather than going through the relatively complex processes proposed for electrically isolating the point rails and closure rails from each other, why not leave the rivets in place, cut the connecting straps on each each side of the rivets, then bridge those cuts with very thin pieces of styrene secured with CA or epoxy? Or, cut the straps and glue them to the throwbar and closure bar?

Dante Fuligni

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Doug Stuard <dstuard@...>
 

Should work fine, so long as the DCC voltage inside the reversing section (and powering the head end locos) is substantilally the same as that outside the reversing section (where the helpers are). The direction of travel of the locos will not change in any case, as it is unaffected by changes in track polarity/phase. The reversing section must still be longer than the longest train however.

Doug Stuard

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Greg Harter <greg1462@...> wrote:

......and if you are running a train with a helper in the middle, or at the
end, this won't work, I don't think.

Greg Harter

On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 3:49 PM, Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>wrote:



I might agree that you can get by if each of the insulating rail gaps are
1/4 inch long and filled with plastic (HO scale) as long as 1) the A-R
section is longer than any loco consist; and 2) you will never have any
freight or passenger cars fitted with metal trucks intended for multi-axle
pick-up or use trailing 'pusher' locos. That might work OK today, but you
are tempting fate. Re-read my #5. What will you do next year when your buddy
brings over his passenger train?
DonV


-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... <WiringForDCC%40yahoogroups.com>[mailto:
WiringForDCC@... <WiringForDCC%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf
Of William Shanaman
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2010 12:32 PM
To: WiringForDCC@... <WiringForDCC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Dan has covered this well.

In addition the "rule" of the reversing section longer than the train is
good but rules are made, in this case, to be broken. You should still use an
auto reverser such as a PS-AR or ordinary manual toggle. I use the PS-AR
from Tony's or DCC Specialties unit. They both work great right out of the
package.

Here's the broken part of the rule. If you install a set of short 'dead
sections' of track about 1/4 inch long in between the reversing section and
the insulators to the regular track on both ends of the reversing section on
both rails this rule in most cases goes away. This means that the steel
wheels or locomotive wheels will not bridge that gap if the train is longer
than the section itself and will not cause the short. The reverser will
'flop' the polarity like it's supposed to but when the train crosses both
gaps it will keep going and not short. I have used this on my railroad and
it works just dandy. For the short dead pieces I used the plastic guard rail
from old Atlas turnouts and epoxied them in. I even used the part of the tie
to keep it at the
correct alignment. Once the glue has dried you can file it. Folks
have also used bits of styrene to accomplish the same thing. You just file
it to shape. It is glued in there solidly and the rail gaps won't close with
weather changes. Work well.

Bill Shanaman
Sugar City, CO.

------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo! Groups Links




Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

You are correct Rich. As a single steel wheel rolls across a rail gap it will touch the rails on both sides of the gap at the same time (while making the clickety-clack sound) ...unless the gap is filled with a non-conductive material, thus creating a small section of dead track. Short sections of dead track are not wanted, but certainly occur at every turnout with an insulated dead frog. And it happens inadvertently when the track is dirty. Most locos with multi-wheel pick-up will roll right over those places while getting power from a different wheel.

DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of richhotrain
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2010 3:59 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Thanks everyone for your comments and suggestions. All of this is extremely helpful to me.

At the heart of my question was the uncertainty over whether metal wheels without power pickups could cause shorts. What I had not considered was the fact that small gaps in the rail result in the wheel making contact with both ends of the rail, inside and outside the reversing section. Creating a 1/4" section of dead track is an intriguing thought, although I understand the cautionary comments about setting up such a dead section.

Thanks again for clearing this up for me.

Rich



------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo! Groups Links

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

richhotrain <redking56@...>
 

Thanks everyone for your comments and suggestions. All of this is extremely helpful to me.

At the heart of my question was the uncertainty over whether metal wheels without power pickups could cause shorts. What I had not considered was the fact that small gaps in the rail result in the wheel making contact with both ends of the rail, inside and outside the reversing section. Creating a 1/4" section of dead track is an intriguing thought, although I understand the cautionary comments about setting up such a dead section.

Thanks again for clearing this up for me.

Rich

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Greg Harter
 

......and if you are running a train with a helper in the middle, or at the
end, this won't work, I don't think.

Greg Harter

On Mon, Jul 12, 2010 at 3:49 PM, Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>wrote:



I might agree that you can get by if each of the insulating rail gaps are
1/4 inch long and filled with plastic (HO scale) as long as 1) the A-R
section is longer than any loco consist; and 2) you will never have any
freight or passenger cars fitted with metal trucks intended for multi-axle
pick-up or use trailing 'pusher' locos. That might work OK today, but you
are tempting fate. Re-read my #5. What will you do next year when your buddy
brings over his passenger train?
DonV


-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... <WiringForDCC%40yahoogroups.com>[mailto:
WiringForDCC@... <WiringForDCC%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf
Of William Shanaman
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2010 12:32 PM
To: WiringForDCC@... <WiringForDCC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Dan has covered this well.

In addition the "rule" of the reversing section longer than the train is
good but rules are made, in this case, to be broken. You should still use an
auto reverser such as a PS-AR or ordinary manual toggle. I use the PS-AR
from Tony's or DCC Specialties unit. They both work great right out of the
package.

Here's the broken part of the rule. If you install a set of short 'dead
sections' of track about 1/4 inch long in between the reversing section and
the insulators to the regular track on both ends of the reversing section on
both rails this rule in most cases goes away. This means that the steel
wheels or locomotive wheels will not bridge that gap if the train is longer
than the section itself and will not cause the short. The reverser will
'flop' the polarity like it's supposed to but when the train crosses both
gaps it will keep going and not short. I have used this on my railroad and
it works just dandy. For the short dead pieces I used the plastic guard rail
from old Atlas turnouts and epoxied them in. I even used the part of the tie
to keep it at the
correct alignment. Once the glue has dried you can file it. Folks
have also used bits of styrene to accomplish the same thing. You just file
it to shape. It is glued in there solidly and the rail gaps won't close with
weather changes. Work well.

Bill Shanaman
Sugar City, CO.

------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo! Groups Links


Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

I might agree that you can get by if each of the insulating rail gaps are 1/4 inch long and filled with plastic (HO scale) as long as 1) the A-R section is longer than any loco consist; and 2) you will never have any freight or passenger cars fitted with metal trucks intended for multi-axle pick-up or use trailing 'pusher' locos. That might work OK today, but you are tempting fate. Re-read my #5. What will you do next year when your buddy brings over his passenger train?
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of William Shanaman
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2010 12:32 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: Re: [WiringForDCC] Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Dan has covered this well.

In addition the "rule" of the reversing section longer than the train is good but rules are made, in this case, to be broken. You should still use an auto reverser such as a PS-AR or ordinary manual toggle. I use the PS-AR from Tony's or DCC Specialties unit. They both work great right out of the package.

Here's the broken part of the rule. If you install a set of short 'dead sections' of track about 1/4 inch long in between the reversing section and the insulators to the regular track on both ends of the reversing section on both rails this rule in most cases goes away. This means that the steel wheels or locomotive wheels will not bridge that gap if the train is longer than the section itself and will not cause the short. The reverser will 'flop' the polarity like it's supposed to but when the train crosses both gaps it will keep going and not short. I have used this on my railroad and it works just dandy. For the short dead pieces I used the plastic guard rail from old Atlas turnouts and epoxied them in. I even used the part of the tie to keep it at the
correct alignment. Once the glue has dried you can file it. Folks
have also used bits of styrene to accomplish the same thing. You just file it to shape. It is glued in there solidly and the rail gaps won't close with weather changes. Work well.

Bill Shanaman
Sugar City, CO.


------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo! Groups Links

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

William Shanaman <billy44@...>
 

Dan has covered this well.

In addition the "rule" of the reversing section longer than the train is good but rules are made, in this case, to be broken. You should still use an auto reverser such as a PS-AR or ordinary manual toggle. I use the PS-AR from Tony's or DCC Specialties unit. They both work great right out of the package.

Here's the broken part of the rule. If you install a set of short 'dead sections' of track about 1/4 inch long in between the reversing section and the insulators to the regular track on both ends of the reversing section on both rails this rule in most cases goes away. This means that the steel wheels or locomotive wheels will not bridge that gap if the train is longer than the section itself and will not cause the short. The reverser will 'flop' the polarity like it's supposed to but when the train crosses both gaps it will keep going and not short. I have used this on my railroad and it works just dandy. For the short dead pieces I used the plastic guard rail from old Atlas turnouts and epoxied them in. I even used the part of the tie to keep it at the correct alignment. Once the glue has dried you can file it. Folks have also used bits of styrene to accomplish the same thing. You just file it to shape. It is glued in there solidly and the rail gaps won't close with weather changes. Work well.

Bill Shanaman
Sugar City, CO.

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Dan Janda
 

Doug, don't forget (in addition to the pliers) the short between the (headset, earbuds, ...) or at the keyboard.

Nice reply on the subject of hard and "soft" shorts. Another similar distinction is the intermittent or noisy connection which only shorts for a moment and only sometimes. (PITA, if I recall the right acronym).

Thanks for all your support to us.

Dan

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "Doug Stuard" <dstuard@...> wrote:


--- In WiringForDCC@..., "richhotrain" <redking56@> wrote:

Having operated in DCC for over 7 years now, I should be embarrased to ask this question, but here goes.

When setting up a reversing section of track, how long must it be?
Conventional wisdom says that a reversing section should be as long as the longest train. This is to ensure thatan auto-reverse unit wont be triang to resolve polarity conflicts at both the entrance and exit of the reversing section at the same time (whih is obviously impossible). Some folks get away with shorter sections if all the rolling stock except locos have plastic wheels, which donot trigger AR units.


Will any car with metal wheels cause a short if it spans the reversing section and the non-reversing section? Or, will only cars with power pickups such as lighted passenger cars cause a short if any of the wheels are outside the reversing section?
Single metal wheels can cause a short if they touch both sides of a rail gap at the same time. Locos and rolling stock trucks with multi-wheel pickup will most assuredly cause the same effect. Best to plan for both cases.


While I am on this topic, I think I understand what a "dead short" is, but what other kind of short is there?
A "dead short" or "hard short" is one of pretty close to zero ohms resistance. Oftentimes there can be a short where contact is less than perfect. I generally refer to this as a "soft short", but there is no universal term agreed to. I generally figure a soft short as anything that causes more current to be drawn than you want, and which should trigger your protection circuitry. For 14 VDCC track power with a short detection threshold of 3.5 Amps for example, a "soft short" would be anything less than 14/3.5 = 4 Ohms. An alternate interpretation is anything that draws more current than you want, but is less than that necessary to trip the protection. In this case, you should either change your druthers, or change the trip threshold.

When a short is caused by a train with cars outside of the reversing section, is the result a dead short?
Only if there is solid contact. Hard short or soft short, location doesn't matter. A short outside a reversing section is a legitimate problem, and the power manager should shut down power to that section of track. A short inside a reversing section first assumes that the cause is due to a normal gap crossing, which is resolved by reversing the polarity/phase of the reversing section. If the short still exists, then it is assumed that the problem is similar to that of the first case and power should be removed until the short (derail, pliers across the track, etc.) is removed.


Thanks in advance for your help.

Rich
NP

Doug Stuard

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Vollrath, Don <dvollrath@...>
 

Rich,
Be sure to read up on this on Allan's wiringfordcc.com website.

1. The basic rule is to make the reversing track section longer than the entire longest train. Then it will always work correctly with any kind of wheels or train or isolating gaps in the track.

Reversing track sections must have both rails isolated from main lines at both ends. When the reversing track polarity does not match the mains at one end (and it will always be that way at one end or the other) any metalic connection that 'jumpers' the gap on the same rail will cause an electrical short circuit. The current increase caused by the short is what triggers the A-R unit to reverse track polarity, which supposedly corrects the problem. If such a short occurs at both ends of the reversing track section at the same time, the A-R unit will be wrong no matter which polarity is selected.

2. Note that a single steel wheel will touch both sides of an open gap as it falls into the crack between rails if the gap is not filled with a non conductive material (which momentarily isolates the wheel from the rails). Likewise, the flanges of a steel wheel may also touch the sides of both rails if the gap is on a curve as cars roll by.

3. Locos with multi-wheel pickup, passenger car trucks with metal sideframes or any other trucks with built-in electrical pick-up (even though you may not be using it) make an electrical connection between wheels on one side of the truck through the metal axles. This forms a 'rolling electrical jumper' the length of the loco or a 2 (or 3) live axle truck. As long as it continues to roll over rails of the same electrical polarity, all is good.

4. Obviously if all rolling stock behind the loco consist used plastic wheels, the issues of #2 & #3 will not exist as long as the reversing track section is longer than your longest loco consist.

5. One can imagine and hope that you don't need to abide by Rule #1 because you have seen trains roll over a shorter reversing section with no apparent problem. But read again what I say in #2 and #3 above. Eventually the day will come when you have a pusher loco, or passenger coach, or simply a freight car with steel wheels attempts to cross into the reversing section just as the loco, or another car with steel wheels, is exiting. Yes, you might get lucky if spacing between wheels and axles just happens to avoid crossing the gaps at both ends at the same time. But Murphy's Law and probablility is working against you.

6. There are other more complicated schemes to help avoid the issue. One is to use the direction of turnouts to operate a relay that selects the source of track power to essentially extend the A-R powered section in the direction of the selected track path. A second method is to form unpowered entry and exit 'portals' leading up to the reversing section. Loy's toys used to sell a PCB item just for this purpose. I'm not sure if another company picked up that product when Loy's went out of business. This method does work but also has some shortcomings. You can find my analysis of the circuit in the wiringfordcc files section.

As to your other questions:
A 'Dead Short' is one of low resistance that doesn't go away. - think a wiring error, or jumper wire (or pair of pliers) placed across the track.

A 'momentary' or 'intermittent' short would be one that lasts only a fraction of a second or shows up only once in a while. Re-read #2 above. Also happens when the back of a wheel flange happens to touch a rail of opposite polarity when, for example, it rolls through a turnout. Sometimes these occurred with DC systems, but we didn't notice or care because the 'throttle' limited short circuit current to relatively small values and the trans kept rolling. With DCC it can cause a momentary but annoying large surge of current that causes boosters to trip off. Preventing these is what Wiring-For-DCC is all about.

Sometimes a momentary short is also one of significant resistance that limits current such that the booster, or other electrical circuit breaker, does not trip. In that case there may be high heat build up at the location of the short circuit. This can damage rail pick-up and loco wiring, or worse, start a fire.

Regards,
DonV

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On Behalf Of richhotrain
Sent: Monday, July 12, 2010 6:27 AM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Having operated in DCC for over 7 years now, I should be embarrased to ask this question, but here goes.

When setting up a reversing section of track, how long must it be?

Will any car with metal wheels cause a short if it spans the reversing section and the non-reversing section? Or, will only cars with power pickups such as lighted passenger cars cause a short if any of the wheels are outside the reversing section?

While I am on this topic, I think I understand what a "dead short" is, but what other kind of short is there?

When a short is caused by a train with cars outside of the reversing section, is the result a dead short?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Rich



------------------------------------

http://www.WiringForDCC.comYahoo! Groups Links

Re: Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

Doug Stuard <dstuard@...>
 

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "richhotrain" <redking56@...> wrote:

Having operated in DCC for over 7 years now, I should be embarrased to ask this question, but here goes.

When setting up a reversing section of track, how long must it be?
Conventional wisdom says that a reversing section should be as long as the longest train. This is to ensure thatan auto-reverse unit wont be triang to resolve polarity conflicts at both the entrance and exit of the reversing section at the same time (whih is obviously impossible). Some folks get away with shorter sections if all the rolling stock except locos have plastic wheels, which donot trigger AR units.


Will any car with metal wheels cause a short if it spans the reversing section and the non-reversing section? Or, will only cars with power pickups such as lighted passenger cars cause a short if any of the wheels are outside the reversing section?
Single metal wheels can cause a short if they touch both sides of a rail gap at the same time. Locos and rolling stock trucks with multi-wheel pickup will most assuredly cause the same effect. Best to plan for both cases.


While I am on this topic, I think I understand what a "dead short" is, but what other kind of short is there?
A "dead short" or "hard short" is one of pretty close to zero ohms resistance. Oftentimes there can be a short where contact is less than perfect. I generally refer to this as a "soft short", but there is no universal term agreed to. I generally figure a soft short as anything that causes more current to be drawn than you want, and which should trigger your protection circuitry. For 14 VDCC track power with a short detection threshold of 3.5 Amps for example, a "soft short" would be anything less than 14/3.5 = 4 Ohms. An alternate interpretation is anything that draws more current than you want, but is less than that necessary to trip the protection. In this case, you should either change your druthers, or change the trip threshold.

When a short is caused by a train with cars outside of the reversing section, is the result a dead short?
Only if there is solid contact. Hard short or soft short, location doesn't matter. A short outside a reversing section is a legitimate problem, and the power manager should shut down power to that section of track. A short inside a reversing section first assumes that the cause is due to a normal gap crossing, which is resolved by reversing the polarity/phase of the reversing section. If the short still exists, then it is assumed that the problem is similar to that of the first case and power should be removed until the short (derail, pliers across the track, etc.) is removed.


Thanks in advance for your help.

Rich
NP

Doug Stuard

Reversing Section - How Long Must It Be

richhotrain <redking56@...>
 

Having operated in DCC for over 7 years now, I should be embarrased to ask this question, but here goes.

When setting up a reversing section of track, how long must it be?

Will any car with metal wheels cause a short if it spans the reversing section and the non-reversing section? Or, will only cars with power pickups such as lighted passenger cars cause a short if any of the wheels are outside the reversing section?

While I am on this topic, I think I understand what a "dead short" is, but what other kind of short is there?

When a short is caused by a train with cars outside of the reversing section, is the result a dead short?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Rich

Re: Digitrax DN143IP

Paul O
 

Ashley, per the Digitrax manual: Set CV49 and CV50 to 104 decimal (68 hex).

Paul O

P.S. Questions for Digitrax specific decoders would be best answered on the Digitrax forum.

----- Original Message -----

Does anyone know if or how a Digitrax DN143IP decoder can be configured for rule 17 lighting?

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards
Ashley

Re: Digitrax DN143IP

dcesharkman
 

Easiest way is to use JMRI's Decoder Pro.  If I could remember what CV's are
used, I could look them up for you.




________________________________
From: bigashrob9c7 <ashley.roberts4@...>
To: WiringForDCC@...
Sent: Sat, July 10, 2010 3:00:38 AM
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Digitrax DN143IP

 
Does anyone know if or how a Digitrax DN143IP decoder can be configured for rule
17 lighting?

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards
Ashley




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Digitrax DN143IP

bigashrob9c7
 

Does anyone know if or how a Digitrax DN143IP decoder can be configured for rule 17 lighting?

Any help would be appreciated

Best Regards
Ashley

Re: Infuriating Athearn Genesis sound in an SD45-2

jrchaff2 <jrchaff@...>
 

I should have cautioned that, if replacing the MRC board with
a Tsunami, you would want to ensure speaker compatibility of
the MRC speaker; or get another one that will work with
Tsunami's. MRC speakers are largely OK, but the impedance
match may not be the best.

Dick

(yahoo is getting wierder and wierder; strange message 'title'
displayed...)

--- In WiringForDCC@..., "jrchaff2" <jrchaff@...> wrote:

Chris - this may not be what you want to hear, but:

I bought three of these - all without the dcc/sound option. I am
installing a *good* dcc/sound system, using the speaker cavity
which IS included - and rewiring the flasher on top the cab,
so it flashes (steady in dc).

My opinion of the MRC electronic systems (which these units had
as the dcc/sound option) is that it is abysmal. In my opinion,
MRC sound is really not very good by comparison even to 'ordinary'
other chips, and the motor control is pretty unstable and ragged.

If you can stomach it, my advice is to rip out the MRC board,
leave the speaker (MRC speakers are OK), and put in a Tsunami.

Dick / Bozeman

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Chris Brown <GreenElite_499@> wrote:


Hey

i'm having a disappointing time with my SD45-2. When i first got it, it ran fine for a long time, until this past winter the headlights would not turn on (despite being functional, if i hooked them into power they lit.). Eventually, something weird happened and it locked up, and not even recovery programming or the reset would save it, so i sent it back to athearn for replacement. the decoder i got was glitchy from the start, and now once again, the engine doesn't respond. It sometimes starts with its sound, and always has the rear headlight on, but will not run or respond. There is a chance that it might not have been completely removed from a consist at my club, but so far, nothing is making it return to normal.

anyway i can fix this? or are these sound units doomed to fail?

Chris

Re: Infuriating Athearn Genesis sound in an SD45-2

sdcruz@...
 

Steve

What does CV 1 show? Plug in this value when you select the loco and see if
you can get back control.

Cheers
Shelton.

Quoting Steve Haas <Goatfisher2@...>:

"I'm afraid to play with CV19, because that's what killed the original
decoder. the locomotive still listened in a consist even if the headlights
wouldn't turn on, and to clear it, i changed cv19 to zero, and that was the
last straw. it wouldn't even turn on after that. "

Chris,

There's no need to be afraid of playing with CV 19, but there are some
caveats:

CV 19 can really only exist in two states - "Not in consist", in which it
will have a value of 0, and "In consist" in which case it will have the
assigned consist number 1 through 127.

The big thing to remember when programming CV 19 to 0 to clear an engine out
of a consist is that may only be half the problem. If an engine is set up
on another layout to run in a consist, and then bought home it will still be
in that consist.

Clearing out the CV on the engine at home, will allow the engine to be run
at home as a single engine.

However, when you take that engine back to the other layout, the command
station on that layout still sees the engine as in whatever consist it was
previously. The results of this will vary based on the make/model of that
DCC system.

To resolve this issue, the engine must be removed from the consist in the
DCC system's mind.

With NCE, this is done by using the Consist > Del command to delete the
engine from the _system's_ memory.

Check the documentation for the DCC systems in use to see how this is
accomplished with those systems.



Best regards,

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA





------------------------------------------------------------
This email was sent from Netspace Webmail: http://www.netspace.net.au

Re: Infuriating Athearn Genesis sound in an SD45-2

Steve Haas
 

"I'm afraid to play with CV19, because that's what killed the original
decoder. the locomotive still listened in a consist even if the headlights
wouldn't turn on, and to clear it, i changed cv19 to zero, and that was the
last straw. it wouldn't even turn on after that. "

Chris,

There's no need to be afraid of playing with CV 19, but there are some
caveats:

CV 19 can really only exist in two states - "Not in consist", in which it
will have a value of 0, and "In consist" in which case it will have the
assigned consist number 1 through 127.

The big thing to remember when programming CV 19 to 0 to clear an engine out
of a consist is that may only be half the problem. If an engine is set up
on another layout to run in a consist, and then bought home it will still be
in that consist.

Clearing out the CV on the engine at home, will allow the engine to be run
at home as a single engine.

However, when you take that engine back to the other layout, the command
station on that layout still sees the engine as in whatever consist it was
previously. The results of this will vary based on the make/model of that
DCC system.

To resolve this issue, the engine must be removed from the consist in the
DCC system's mind.

With NCE, this is done by using the Consist > Del command to delete the
engine from the _system's_ memory.

Check the documentation for the DCC systems in use to see how this is
accomplished with those systems.



Best regards,

Steve Haas
Snoqualmie, WA

Re: Infuriating Athearn Genesis sound in an SD45-2

Robert Heroux
 

This is why Athearn has changed its sound systems to Tsunami's.

Bob

On Jul 6, 2010, at 9:38 AM, jrchaff2 wrote:

Chris - this may not be what you want to hear, but:

I bought three of these - all without the dcc/sound option. I am
installing a *good* dcc/sound system, using the speaker cavity
which IS included - and rewiring the flasher on top the cab,
so it flashes (steady in dc).

My opinion of the MRC electronic systems (which these units had
as the dcc/sound option) is that it is abysmal. In my opinion,
MRC sound is really not very good by comparison even to 'ordinary'
other chips, and the motor control is pretty unstable and ragged.

If you can stomach it, my advice is to rip out the MRC board,
leave the speaker (MRC speakers are OK), and put in a Tsunami.

Dick / Bozeman

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Chris Brown <GreenElite_499@...> wrote:


Hey

i'm having a disappointing time with my SD45-2. When i first got it, it ran fine for a long time, until this past winter the headlights would not turn on (despite being functional, if i hooked them into power they lit.). Eventually, something weird happened and it locked up, and not even recovery programming or the reset would save it, so i sent it back to athearn for replacement. the decoder i got was glitchy from the start, and now once again, the engine doesn't respond. It sometimes starts with its sound, and always has the rear headlight on, but will not run or respond. There is a chance that it might not have been completely removed from a consist at my club, but so far, nothing is making it return to normal.

anyway i can fix this? or are these sound units doomed to fail?

Chris
Robert Heroux
ACCU-LITES, Inc.
118 S. Main St. STE 12
Wauconda, IL 60084

Your DCC Center

Phone: 847.224.7914
FAX: 847.487.2089

http://www.acculites.com



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

New Yahoo Group - DCCYardSale

Bob Dobrowolski <el_railfan@...>
 

Since DCC is really scale and gauge independent, I have created a new group for the sale of DCC equipment.  Want lists can also be posted.

DCCYardSale-subscribe@...

or

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/DCCYardSale/?yguid=8852939
 
--
Thanks,

Bob Dobrowolski
http://www.angelfire.com/nj4/merrcnj/

If it ain't broke, take it apart, and find out why.

Re: Infuriating Athearn Genesis sound in an SD45-2

jrchaff2 <jrchaff@...>
 

Chris - this may not be what you want to hear, but:

I bought three of these - all without the dcc/sound option. I am
installing a *good* dcc/sound system, using the speaker cavity
which IS included - and rewiring the flasher on top the cab,
so it flashes (steady in dc).

My opinion of the MRC electronic systems (which these units had
as the dcc/sound option) is that it is abysmal. In my opinion,
MRC sound is really not very good by comparison even to 'ordinary'
other chips, and the motor control is pretty unstable and ragged.

If you can stomach it, my advice is to rip out the MRC board,
leave the speaker (MRC speakers are OK), and put in a Tsunami.

Dick / Bozeman

--- In WiringForDCC@..., Chris Brown <GreenElite_499@...> wrote:


Hey

i'm having a disappointing time with my SD45-2. When i first got it, it ran fine for a long time, until this past winter the headlights would not turn on (despite being functional, if i hooked them into power they lit.). Eventually, something weird happened and it locked up, and not even recovery programming or the reset would save it, so i sent it back to athearn for replacement. the decoder i got was glitchy from the start, and now once again, the engine doesn't respond. It sometimes starts with its sound, and always has the rear headlight on, but will not run or respond. There is a chance that it might not have been completely removed from a consist at my club, but so far, nothing is making it return to normal.

anyway i can fix this? or are these sound units doomed to fail?

Chris