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Re: So no plastic rail joiners needed when using DDC to run locos ?

Marcus Ammann
 

Hi jeffln55

You have to wire up a DCC layout the same as a DC layout, with all the
relevant plastic rail joiners where there is a possibility of a short, just
like any layout.

You don't have to wire in any "blocks" that are used in DC layouts to
isolate locos because the DCC decoder has a unique address and will only
respond when addressed, leaving all other DCC locos on the track,
stationary.

Power districts, a form of blocks, is recommended for most medium to large
layouts for troubleshooting etc. A small single operator layout will operate
satisfactory with only one power district.

Visit Allan Gartner's Wiring for DCC at

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track.htm

for answers to all your questions.

Marcus.

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On
Behalf Of jeffln55
Sent: Monday, 17 October 2005 10:52 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] So no plastic rail joiners needed when using DDC to
run locos ?

Hi well are no plastic rail joiners needed to run DDC powered Locos.

So no blocks correct?

Now all that is needed is the decoder added and run correct.

Thanks

this will be a new layout so wiring is not started as of yet.






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Yahoo! Groups Links

So no plastic rail joiners needed when using DDC to run locos ?

jeffln55
 

Hi well are no plastic rail joiners needed to run DDC powered Locos.

So no blocks correct?

Now all that is needed is the decoder added and run correct.

Thanks

this will be a new layout so wiring is not started as of yet.

Re: Overheating

Marcus Ammann
 

Hi asterrymc

12 volt lamps are ok for loco headlights when operated on DC due the
headlight only illuminates dimly when going slow and bright when going
faster. This also applies with constant brightness circuits and the lamp is
brighter with slow operation. When the loco stops the light is extinguished.

In DCC the headlight is illuminated bright when it is selected on and stays
illuminated with the loco stationary. Only off when selected off. This can
mean the headlight can be illuminated all the time while the power is
supplied to the layout. Light is on all the time.

A 40 mA incandescent dissipates about 1/2 a watt and this over a long time
will certainly cause some heat.

This is one of the reasons that I change all my incandescent lamps to
Prototype White LEDs. Incandescent lamps make lots of heat and a little
light, while a LED makes a lot of light and a little heat. Secondly a LED
generally only needs about 10 - 15 mAs of current.

I suggest for you next installation you use LEDs for the headlights.

Make sure you use Prototype White, Golden Glow or similar ones that don't
have the blue tinge that normal white LEDs have. The white LEDs are ok for
late model diesels, but not early and steam engines.

Marcus

-----Original Message-----
From: WiringForDCC@... [mailto:WiringForDCC@...] On
Behalf Of asterrymc
Sent: Sunday, 16 October 2005 10:07 PM
To: WiringForDCC@...
Subject: [WiringForDCC] Overheating

My first attempt at installing a DCC decoder in an old style Life-Like
GP18 (N scale) took much longer than I thought and with perseverance I
succeeded. The loco ran smoothly and the decoder functions all
worked. I even added a light for reversing. After running it for a
while I noticed that the grain of wheat bulbs I had installed where
starting to melt the case badly. I used 12V bulbs - how do I overcome
this heat problem for the next install?






http://www.WiringForDCC.com
Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Wiring Walthers/Shin 3-Way Switch for DCC

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

Dave,

I'd like to answer your question, but I haven't seen one of these
turnouts yet. Even if I had, it would be hard to describe in words.
I'll try to see one at my local hobby shop the next time I go and I'll
make a drawing. Don't hold your breath waiting for the drawing. I'm
working full time and going to school at night. My weekends are taken
up studying. The drawing won't likely appear in my web page until the
end of the semester.

In the interim, I suggest the following: Draw out the turnout. Make
3 drawings; one each for the 3 routes the train can take. Label the
stock rails + and - and follow it through the turnout. By noting
which set of points was moved to change the polarity of the rails, you
will know which frog needs to be controlled by which set of points.

Allan

Overheating

asterrymc <asterrymc@...>
 

My first attempt at installing a DCC decoder in an old style Life-Like
GP18 (N scale) took much longer than I thought and with perseverance I
succeeded. The loco ran smoothly and the decoder functions all
worked. I even added a light for reversing. After running it for a
while I noticed that the grain of wheat bulbs I had installed where
starting to melt the case badly. I used 12V bulbs - how do I overcome
this heat problem for the next install?

Re: do I need new bus wires

FLEXIBLETRACK@...
 

Brian, as my branch line is really a preserved line with a main line
connection, engines crossing from main to branch will not be an every day
occurrence,so Iam prepared to put up with the two throttle option for now. But one more
problem has just come to light, I cant find my Compact!! I thought it was in
its box, but its empty! and I`ve spent the last hour looking for it. I will
have to re-think this idea through, the only reason I started this was to try
and avoid a short stopping the whole layout with out spending money on more
equipment. You have been very helpfull and I`ve learnt some thing in the
proccess. I dont suppose you live in Wiltshire? David.

Re: do I need new bus wires

brianw1138@...
 

David,
There is one thing I assumed.

Can the Lenz Compact be connected as a booster? Can you plug the command bus from the Lenz 100 into the Compact? If you don't know this, you'll have to check on the Lenz site.

If they can't be interconnected, then you will essentially have two independent railroads. When a loco drives across the gap, it'll stop, but there will be no short. You'll have to pick up a throttle connected to the other controller, and drive away....

Re: do I need new bus wires

brianw1138@...
 

Let me know if you have trouble when you actually hook it all up.

Re: do I need new bus wires

Brian Williams <brianw1138@...>
 

David,

It isn't strictly necessary to get an Accurate voltage reading (within
a few percent), although that is certainly possible. If the rails are
out of polarity, any AC meter will read something, maybe not steadily,
but it'll bounce around near, say, 10v (I'm making that number up),
While if the rails are in polarity, the reading may bounce around near
.1V. I hope you get the idea.

A simple test fixture would be a 16v (or 20 or 24) light bulb
connected to two aligator clips. Attach one clip to each side of the
rail and turn on the juice. If the light lights, switch the wires off
the booster (The branch line booster), and try again. Of course, you
turned the power off before you disconnected the feeder bus, right? If
the light still lights up, then I need to turn in my Electrical
Engineering Degree (Which will upset my mother no end!).

DCC Specialites.com makes and Tony's and Walthers sells, is a thing
call the RRAmpMeter, which can measure True RMS voltage, A thing you
need for DCC. It's not necessary for this project, but if the boosters
are too far out of amplitude with each other, you may want to set
your booster's output voltage. It is unclear to me whether Motor
Starting voltage is in actual volts, or a relative range. For a given
system, the two are indistingushable(sp?) from each other. However, if
MY system is set at 12.2v and YOURs is set at 18.7v, will our Locos
run significantly differently? Does it matter? But I digress.

Another thing that will tell you if the rails are in polarity or not,
is to run a loco over the gap. If its stops, you have a problem. :-)

Re: do I need new bus wires

Brian Williams <brianw1138@...>
 

If I understand your question correctly, Yes, the branch should have
bus wires seperate from the rest of the layout; feeding the output of
two boosters into each other is bad. Just be sure there is no polarity
difference at the rail gap. If your volt meter doesn't read zero volts
(AC) across the gap (of each rail) then you have a problem, switch the
wires coming off the boost, that should fix it.

Since you have a seperate set of bus wires, you need corresponding
feeders for the branch.

Re: do I need new bus wires

FLEXIBLETRACK@...
 

Thank you Brian for your help, very usefull this group,thanks again.Dave.

Re: do I need new bus wires

FLEXIBLETRACK@...
 

Thank you Brian. Very helpfull. I do not possess a meter that will work on
DCC,can you enlighten me as to what I need,thank you. David.

do I need new bus wires

DAVE STEVENS <FLEXIBLETRACK@...>
 

I am using a lenz 100 on a 18*8 layout,main line & branch.I have a
spare lenz Compact+transformer I would like to use the compact to power
my branch line,which has 1 rail connection with the main line all ready
fitted with insulated rail joiners. Do I need to fit new bus wires and
feeds for the branch,and will trains pass branch to main line on the
same throttle. Any information would be appreciated.

Bachmann Tender Connector

Brian Williams <brianw1138@...>
 

Does anyone happen to know a part number for the connector that mates
to the 2 and 4 pin plugs on a Bachmann Spectrum Tender?

I have some older Rivarossi Y6bs (not DCC ready) and I want to run
them with Bachmann tenders (which are).

I don't expect a bachmann number, since they don't even acknowledge
the thing exists on the locomotive diagrams; but a molex (or other
OEM) number would rule.

Train Navigation

a_allemby <a_allemby@...>
 

Hi, I've seen that Fleishmann has introduced Train Navigation, but
according to the literature it can only be used with their Twin
Centre (6802). Is there any truth in this? I'm currently using the
Lenz (LVZ100) Command Station and would like to use a Train
Navigation System in conjunction with My Lenz set-up. Can anyone
offer advice?
Thanks Adrian

Wiring Walthers/Shin 3-Way Switch for DCC

Dave <dklproductions@...>
 

To all,

I am trying to wire a new DCC friendly Walthers/Shin 3-WAY turnout,
and need some help! I am trying to figure out how to connect the 3
seperate frogs so they are properly powered depending on how the throw
rails are aligned. I have not purchased any type of switch machine
yet, as I do not know what type would be best for this situation. I
was able to solder leads onto the 3 frogs to drop down under the
table, as well as solder jumpers from the closure rails to throw
rails. But how do I make sure the frogs will be powered correctly??

Thanks,
DAVE

Re: The correct solder type for Feeder Wire and Rail joints

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

It sounds like you have a good plan.

Whatever liquid flux you buy, don't buy acid flux. That will eat your
track over time. I can definitely recommend the liquid flux by H&N
mentioned in my website. I use the "gel" for soldering feeders to
rail by using a toothpick to get a drop. I use a q-tip and
the "liquid" for soldering the feeders to the buses. The stuff works
great!

Re: The correct solder type for Feeder Wire and Rail joints

sjanis0249 <sjanis0249@...>
 

Thank you for the speedy response, I will go out an buy some solid
core solder and liquid flux, it was taking too much time to heat the
rails to make the rosin core flow into the joint ( even with a
230/150 Watt Crsaftsman Soldering gun. Meleting was not an issue
though, I was using alligator clips as heat sinks to keep the ties
from melting, However the clips were also probably adding to the
length of time to heat, since they were absorbing some of the heat.

Regarding the Joiners, I am only solder rail joiners on the curves
(36 radius) and using one feeder wire on each radius and then about
every 6 to ten feet solder feeders on straight track sections. I
leave a small gap (1/32 inch) here and there on the straights to
adjust for humidity (Basement is damp in summer, although I run a
dehumidifier) and dry in the winter (to adjust for my wood L girder
bench work).


WiringForDCC@..., "wirefordcc" <wire4dcc_admin@c...>
wrote:

First a few words on soldering joiners:

Electrically, you do not need to solder both feeders to every piece
of
rail and solder the joiners. You only need to do one or the
other.

Mechanically, if you solder every rail joiner, your track may
buckle
as your room temperature changes. Modelers do like to solder the
joiners of flex track to keep from getting a kink in the joint.

Regarding your use of solder:

Solder that is 96% tin and 4% silver and has a rosin core will
definitely work. However, for easiest solderability, I suggest you
use solder that contains 37-40% lead. I have found that solder
with
4% silver and/or no lead takes more heat to solder than solder
containing only .4% or 0% silver and 37-40% lead. I like the high
(4%) silver content lead for soldering G-scale track - which is
able
to take the additional heat a little easier. But for HO track, you
are likely to melt ties.

While rosin core solder on HO track definitely works, I suggest you
use a solid solder that has no rosin core and use liquid flux.
With
rosin core, you have to apply heat to melt the rosin. With liquid
flux, you don't need to apply this additional heat since the flux
is
laready liquid. So with liquid flux, you run a slightly lesser
risk
of melting ties.

For more on soldering, see my webpage on soldering:

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/solder.htm

Allan

Re: The correct solder type for Feeder Wire and Rail joints

wirefordcc <wire4dcc_admin@...>
 

First a few words on soldering joiners:

Electrically, you do not need to solder both feeders to every piece of
rail and solder the joiners. You only need to do one or the other.

Mechanically, if you solder every rail joiner, your track may buckle
as your room temperature changes. Modelers do like to solder the
joiners of flex track to keep from getting a kink in the joint.

Regarding your use of solder:

Solder that is 96% tin and 4% silver and has a rosin core will
definitely work. However, for easiest solderability, I suggest you
use solder that contains 37-40% lead. I have found that solder with
4% silver and/or no lead takes more heat to solder than solder
containing only .4% or 0% silver and 37-40% lead. I like the high
(4%) silver content lead for soldering G-scale track - which is able
to take the additional heat a little easier. But for HO track, you
are likely to melt ties.

While rosin core solder on HO track definitely works, I suggest you
use a solid solder that has no rosin core and use liquid flux. With
rosin core, you have to apply heat to melt the rosin. With liquid
flux, you don't need to apply this additional heat since the flux is
laready liquid. So with liquid flux, you run a slightly lesser risk
of melting ties.

For more on soldering, see my webpage on soldering:

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/solder.htm

Allan

The correct solder type for Feeder Wire and Rail joints

sjanis0249 <sjanis0249@...>
 

I am soldering feeder wire and also soldering rail joints on code 100
flex track.

I have some electrical repair solder I just purchased and it says it is
lead free, 96% tin and 4% silver, with rosin flux core.

Will this work?

I see reference to Rosin Core solder that is 60% tin and 40% lead in
some railroad books. Is this better or is my mix better, or does it
matter at all?