Date   

Auto Reverser (s)

Ted Atkinson
 

Had used a Digitrax AR1 Auto Reverse Controller, prior to upgrading bus to 14 gauge from 16 gauge, on one reversing section and it worked fine.  Now it allows locos thru one end of the loop but shorts the system at the other end.  Tried reversing the wiring into the reverser and the problem is solved at one end of the loop but not the other (ie the short is now at the other end of the loop).

I substituted a tam valley dual frog juicer, adjusted for reverse loops and it works fine.

Unfortunately, I have several of the Digitrax units and would prefer to get them working without buying another Tam Valley unit.

Any suggestions would be appreciated

Thx, Ted


Staging yard wiring question

Blair
 

I have a 12-track staging yard; in order to implement detection, I need to run one bus wire for each track's front rail, having run that wire through both an on/off switch and a current detector. All is fine there.  However, respecting the second bus wire for each track back rail, is there anything that prevents that wire being common to several/all of the tracks?  I.e. could I wire, in the extreme, all 12 back rails to one common bus feed?  I had already assumed I'd run a wire for each track, but it occurs to me that that may be excessive.

Comments?

Blair


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

John Bauchiero
 

I have to agree with Morgan. I do run NCE but the 1156 did not work for me. I use the 1157’s brake filament. One filament of the 1157  is equivalent to the 1156 and the second is a higher current. The 1156 would not light on a short but worse, it would warm up and not pass enough current to the existing locos. I got brave and tried the 1156s in parallel without total satisfaction. So when using the high current 1157 element it worked well and the PowerCab did not trip. It lit on a short but I am not one to leave a short condition for a long time.  I’m a gambler but not to a point to risk my rolling stock.  I am sure if the current was slightly higher and more instantaneous, the PowerCab would go into protect mode. 

This doesn’t mean this is the best way to protect the PowerCab but until I install a real protector, it will have to do.

I am tending to lean toward the DCC Specialties PSX breakers. Flexible, functional and future DCC worthy. I would welcome comments or corrections. 

John

On Jun 18, 2021, at 10:22 AM, PennsyNut <fan4pennsy@...> wrote:

Just for those of y'all that don't use NCE. I use a 1157 bulb with my Digitrax and it works like it's supposed to. I mounted it at the center of my layout/command station, visible all long my shelf layout. And it has functioned perfectly. No matter where I stand, if I see it flash or light up. I know instantly where the problem is. And it's usually right where I'm at. LOL
Morgan Bilbo, slightly over one year with very basic DCC


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

PennsyNut
 

Just for those of y'all that don't use NCE. I use a 1157 bulb with my Digitrax and it works like it's supposed to. I mounted it at the center of my layout/command station, visible all long my shelf layout. And it has functioned perfectly. No matter where I stand, if I see it flash or light up. I know instantly where the problem is. And it's usually right where I'm at. LOL
Morgan Bilbo, slightly over one year with very basic DCC


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

Dave Hamernik
 

Thanks Ken.


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

 

This is what the NCE sites says about protection of the Powercab

"The Power Cab has built in overload for basic self-protection that will continuously try to reset until destroyed if left uncorrected. The Power Cab does not have circuit breakers that will trip or fuses that will blow. Use the new EB1 v1.1 electronic circuit breaker to protect the Power Cab against short circuits."

The power supply only supports 2 Amperes of current.  This increases the trip time for chem fuses.

Best,
Ken Harstine


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

Dave Hamernik
 

That makes a lot of sense Blair. Thank you. 


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

Blair
 

Dave,

It's a function of prior-current, I suspect - if the bulb was already seeing significant current(i.e. a couple of locos running at speed), then the filament is already warming, so when the short occurs, it takes less time to light up, and hence acts before the powercab; if the filament was cold (i.e. a single low-current loco crawling into a turnout that is in the wrong position), then the booster sees the short before the filament warms.  That's what I think is going on.

I suppose a chart showing which boosters/systems will benefit from bulb-style protection, and which won't, might be useful, but how many people are still deploying bulb protection?

Blair

On 2021-06-16 15:43, Dave Hamernik wrote:
Well I guess wiring up my 1156 bulbs was a bit of an exercise in futility since the powercab responds more quickly. However, the bulbs sometimes do respond first so at the end of the day, they offer an extra level of protection. Not sure why they sometimes light before the powercab but…

Thanks for your response. 
Dave


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

Dave Hamernik
 

Well I guess wiring up my 1156 bulbs was a bit of an exercise in futility since the powercab responds more quickly. However, the bulbs sometimes do respond first so at the end of the day, they offer an extra level of protection. Not sure why they sometimes light before the powercab but…

Thanks for your response. 
Dave


Re: Powering turnout points

Dave Hamernik
 

This paper might be of interest to you. https://www.modeltrainforum.com/attachments/improving-atlas-turnouts-ii-pdf.554704/

if the link doesn’t work search for ‘improving atlas turnouts’. You should find a forum that has this pdf. 


Re: 1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

wirefordcc
 

Hi Dave,

Using a 1156 bulb doesn't work with all systems.  As you probably know, the filament in the bulb needs to heat up for the bulb to limit current.  Some systems are faster than the bulb and the PowerCab is one of them.  I have also found that "chem fuses", which also do a similar thing, will not work with the PowerCab either.  I haven't tried the NCE CP6 bulbs with the PowerCab to see what would happen.  Let's see if anyone else has tried them.

Should no bulb work for you, the new NCE EB1 electronic circuit breaker has a lower initial current trip current than the old one and will work with the PowerCab.  Other electronic circuit breakers, if they have low current trip points, will also likely work.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC


1156 Bulb Short Protection and Powercab

Dave Hamernik
 

I have read a lot about using the 1156 bulb for short protection and understand how it works.  However, I have an NCE Powercab and  find that the Powercab typically senses a power surge first and my bulb doesn’t light.  The bulb lights sometimes but the majority of the time the Powercab turns off and resets.  Has anyone else experienced this that has a Powercab?  Thanks.


DCC Shuttle/reversing units.

Brian Lewis
 

I have a 23 foot long running in/test track. It is currently running in DC, controlled by a DC shuttle unit. After building, cleaning or repair, my locos were put on this and run until everything was as it should be. It never gets used now, as all my locos have been converted to DCC. So I have been exploring the idea of converting it to DCC running.

And here is the problem.  With DC, the unit will cheerfully accommodate any loco that is put on its tracks. But the DCC shuttles I have looked at, require reprogramming of the loco decoder. They seem to ignore the Extended Address and recognise only the Primary Address.  In practice, this means that in order to utilise these units you have to reprogram the loco each time so as to make the Primary Address the Active Address. This is impractical and you really cannot be expected  to undertake this task every time they want a particular loco to run under the control of a unit. What is required is a unit that recognises the Extended Address and is capable of operating any loco that has an Extended Address of 1-9999.

Now being in the UK, there are probably makes of units of which I have not heard. So does such a unit exist? Or is there some other way solve this problem?

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis


Re: Powering turnout points

john
 

There are two holes in the frog, run a tap into the hole and use a screw, looks shabby but it works and a dab of black paint disguises it. I don't know the size of the tap, i fudged it.
Atlas should put the info on the package...........PLEASE.
jd

On Sunday, June 13, 2021, 10:42:15 AM EDT, Greg Harter <greg1462@...> wrote:


The Atlas turnouts have a metal frog to which soldering is nigh impossible.  I've used conductive paint with reasonably good results.  After it has completely dried, put on another coat, and let dry.  Then put a light film of epoxy on it for strength.  The conductive paint has very little holding power.

Greg Harter


Re: Powering turnout points

Greg Harter
 

The Atlas turnouts have a metal frog to which soldering is nigh impossible.  I've used conductive paint with reasonably good results.  After it has completely dried, put on another coat, and let dry.  Then put a light film of epoxy on it for strength.  The conductive paint has very little holding power.

Greg Harter


Re: Genesis GP40-2

Craig Zeni
 

I would use a Decoder Buddy.  The resistors will be right and it's less expensive.  

Craig Zeni
Cary, NC
Despatched from my infernal Android

On Sun, Jun 13, 2021, 03:21 Sam Robinson <samuelrobinson388@...> wrote:
Hello everyone, well Athearn won't stand behind the fact they installed the wrong resistors on my motherboard so I've got to order a new one.  After looking at their site I see a couple to choose from but I can't tell which one I need.  Any help would be appreciated. 

Sam R.
Lewiston Maine 


Genesis GP40-2

Sam Robinson
 

Hello everyone, well Athearn won't stand behind the fact they installed the wrong resistors on my motherboard so I've got to order a new one.  After looking at their site I see a couple to choose from but I can't tell which one I need.  Any help would be appreciated. 

Sam R.
Lewiston Maine 


Re: Powering turnout points

whmvd
 

Michael,

It might, but keep in mind that the wire must:
1) be of adequate size to carry the full current required by the least energy-friendly train you can think of, and
2) be very flexbile so as not to create problems throwing the turnout.
In summary: probably not, but worth a try if you think both items are covered.

Wouter


On Sat, 12 Jun 2021 at 15:27, Michael Shockley via groups.io <docshock31=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think I could solder a single strand of wire from the point to the closure rail it leads to to power the points. Wouldn’t that do it?  Pardon me if I used the wrong term there. 

Mike Shockley 


Re: Powering turnout points

raymond martin
 

That will work.  Leave a bit of slack in the wire. 

On Saturday, June 12, 2021, 09:26:51 AM CDT, Michael Shockley via groups.io <docshock31@...> wrote:


I think I could solder a single strand of wire from the point to the closure rail it leads to to power the points. Wouldn’t that do it?  Pardon me if I used the wrong term there. 

Mike Shockley 


Powering turnout points

Michael Shockley
 

I think I could solder a single strand of wire from the point to the closure rail it leads to to power the points. Wouldn’t that do it?  Pardon me if I used the wrong term there. 

Mike Shockley 

221 - 240 of 12951