Date   
Re: Walthers lighted passenger cars

George Galyon
 

Ditto to Vince's experience.  Our club layout is basically a 3 main loop and our lit passenger cars never short out (DCC or DC).  Could this be a DCC "phasing problem"  with the blocks X-wired?  

Re: DCC Bus distribution and snubbers question

Vincent Ficca
 

Hi All:

I put a breaker at each interlocking section, so to isolate a potential derailment at the turnouts.  The other power district are between the interlocking section, so if anything happens
in the section it is isolated.  Easier to manage derailment problems and keep layout running.

Vince

On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 8:13 AM mgj21932 via Groups.Io <mgj21932=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Carl,
Good suggestion Re: separate power switches.  
Thanks. 
Bill Demarest


On Dec 29, 2019, at 9:12 AM, Carl <carl.blum@...> wrote:



Hi Gang:

I know 34 power districts sounds like a lot. But from a trouble shooting aspect, the more you can isolate a problem to a single small district the better. Even if the districts are served by the same booster or DCC circuit breaker. It makes it easier to divide and conquer.

On my layout I have 6 boosters and 12 power districts. Each district has one power switch ( AC / DCC ) and two breakers, which do trip sometimes. If there is a problem is it nice to reach the power switch and cut power to the district until the problem is solved.

Carl.

On 12/29/2019 1:52 AM, Mark Gurries wrote:

      
On Sep 20, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Blair & Rasa <smithbr@...> wrote:

Hi
I'm planning my DCC layout for my Algoma Central at this time.  I have located three boosters, each at the root of the three peninsulas. 
Each Booster will feed quad current limiters, either PM42s or something more recent. 
However, each limiter's output will feed multiple bus segments(e.g. one bus on the upper peninsula, one on the lower, each fed by the same limiter). 
As each of those runs will exceed 30’,

      
I am wondering if I need an RC snubber at the end of each, or should I put one at the output of the limiter, before we fan out to both runs?
End of each.  Placing them close to the booster defeats the purpose of the snubber.  The goal is to install them at the far end furthest tack bus wire wise away from the booster.

In the grand schema, we have 34 sections of bus to be fed; in some cases a limiter will feed up to four segments of track,
What is the difference between a section and segments?   

I like to use consistent terms.   This is what I THINK you saying.

1) You have 3 Booster Districts.  One Booster District per Peninsula.
2) A Peninsula has 2 levels.
3) You have 34 Power Districts
4) You are using quad output DCC circuit breakers.

I think this break up as follows.

1) Average of about 34/3 ~  11 Power Districts / Booster.   
2) 3 Quad circuit breakers / Booster.
3) Each Level on a given peninula has between 5 or 6 power Districts.

This electrical design is for this large layout creates a unusually high number of power districts per booster.  That is to not say there is anything wrong.  Sounds like a lot of main line running and you getting the most coverage out of a given booster.

so if I have to put a snubber on each long run, the current drain will become significant, I think. 
It will consume about 2 HO locomotives worth.

You need 1 Snubber per power district.

Each snubber has a 100 Ohm resistor.

11 x 100 Ohm resistor in parallel  = 9 ohms.    12V / 9 Ohms = 1.32 Amps.

What you can do is replace the 100 Ohm resistor with a 200 Ohm.  The snubber will be weaker in effectiveness but still work.
 
Is it correct that I need to snub each long run, or is it effective to put a single snubber at the base of the branches?
Yes.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com






Re: DCC Bus distribution and snubbers question

mgj21932
 

Carl,
Good suggestion Re: separate power switches.  
Thanks. 
Bill Demarest


On Dec 29, 2019, at 9:12 AM, Carl <carl.blum@...> wrote:



Hi Gang:

I know 34 power districts sounds like a lot. But from a trouble shooting aspect, the more you can isolate a problem to a single small district the better. Even if the districts are served by the same booster or DCC circuit breaker. It makes it easier to divide and conquer.

On my layout I have 6 boosters and 12 power districts. Each district has one power switch ( AC / DCC ) and two breakers, which do trip sometimes. If there is a problem is it nice to reach the power switch and cut power to the district until the problem is solved.

Carl.

On 12/29/2019 1:52 AM, Mark Gurries wrote:

      
On Sep 20, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Blair & Rasa <smithbr@...> wrote:

Hi
I'm planning my DCC layout for my Algoma Central at this time.  I have located three boosters, each at the root of the three peninsulas. 
Each Booster will feed quad current limiters, either PM42s or something more recent. 
However, each limiter's output will feed multiple bus segments(e.g. one bus on the upper peninsula, one on the lower, each fed by the same limiter). 
As each of those runs will exceed 30’,

      
I am wondering if I need an RC snubber at the end of each, or should I put one at the output of the limiter, before we fan out to both runs?
End of each.  Placing them close to the booster defeats the purpose of the snubber.  The goal is to install them at the far end furthest tack bus wire wise away from the booster.

In the grand schema, we have 34 sections of bus to be fed; in some cases a limiter will feed up to four segments of track,
What is the difference between a section and segments?   

I like to use consistent terms.   This is what I THINK you saying.

1) You have 3 Booster Districts.  One Booster District per Peninsula.
2) A Peninsula has 2 levels.
3) You have 34 Power Districts
4) You are using quad output DCC circuit breakers.

I think this break up as follows.

1) Average of about 34/3 ~  11 Power Districts / Booster.   
2) 3 Quad circuit breakers / Booster.
3) Each Level on a given peninula has between 5 or 6 power Districts.

This electrical design is for this large layout creates a unusually high number of power districts per booster.  That is to not say there is anything wrong.  Sounds like a lot of main line running and you getting the most coverage out of a given booster.

so if I have to put a snubber on each long run, the current drain will become significant, I think. 
It will consume about 2 HO locomotives worth.

You need 1 Snubber per power district.

Each snubber has a 100 Ohm resistor.

11 x 100 Ohm resistor in parallel  = 9 ohms.    12V / 9 Ohms = 1.32 Amps.

What you can do is replace the 100 Ohm resistor with a 200 Ohm.  The snubber will be weaker in effectiveness but still work.
 
Is it correct that I need to snub each long run, or is it effective to put a single snubber at the base of the branches?
Yes.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com






Re: Disrict Buss

Keith Elrod
 

Thanks. That clears that up.
Keith

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019, 1:59 PM Carl <carl.blum@...> wrote:

Hello Keith:

It is also the short name for locomotive in German; a dampflok is a steam locomotive, a E-lok is an electric locomotive, a diesellok can be either a diesel/electric or a diesel hydralic locomotive.

Carl.

On 12/29/2019 10:10 AM, Keith Elrod wrote:
Sorry ... but what is a Lok?

Keith

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 9:56 AM thomasmclae via Groups.Io <mclae5-lists=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
With DCC, the criteria for separate power blocks is as follows:
1. Will you use more amps than you currently have on existing track block. 
2. Do you need to isolate shorts, to prevent one bad Lok from shutting down the entire block.

Note that if you have at least one block (Segment, district).

Amps, plan on 1/2 amp per Lok.  Actual usage varies per Lok, motor efficiency, length of train, up or down inclines, etc. Generally, 4-5 loks can run on each block.
Shorts are common with bad track, bad Loks (Especially steam!), operator errors. If you are having these issues, the more blocks the better.

One common pattern is to have the DCC system fees only boosters, not directly to the track. Makes the DCC system more stable, and last longer.

Note that with DCC, more than one operator can operate trains in any block. You just need the throttles.
Thomas
DeSoto, TX

Re: Disrict Buss

Carl
 

Hello Keith:

It is also the short name for locomotive in German; a dampflok is a steam locomotive, a E-lok is an electric locomotive, a diesellok can be either a diesel/electric or a diesel hydralic locomotive.

Carl.

On 12/29/2019 10:10 AM, Keith Elrod wrote:
Sorry ... but what is a Lok?

Keith

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 9:56 AM thomasmclae via Groups.Io <mclae5-lists=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
With DCC, the criteria for separate power blocks is as follows:
1. Will you use more amps than you currently have on existing track block. 
2. Do you need to isolate shorts, to prevent one bad Lok from shutting down the entire block.

Note that if you have at least one block (Segment, district).

Amps, plan on 1/2 amp per Lok.  Actual usage varies per Lok, motor efficiency, length of train, up or down inclines, etc. Generally, 4-5 loks can run on each block.
Shorts are common with bad track, bad Loks (Especially steam!), operator errors. If you are having these issues, the more blocks the better.

One common pattern is to have the DCC system fees only boosters, not directly to the track. Makes the DCC system more stable, and last longer.

Note that with DCC, more than one operator can operate trains in any block. You just need the throttles.
Thomas
DeSoto, TX

Re: Frog juicer as auto reverser with staggered pickup locomotives

Dale Gloer
 

A single Frog Juicer cannot function as an auto reverser - you need to use a Dual Frog Juicer or one section of a Hex Frog Juicer with appropriate jumpers installed.

Dale Gloer

Re: Disrict Buss

Craig Zeni
 

Or used as shorthand for "locomotive".

Craig Zeni
Cary, NC
Despatched from my infernal Android

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019, 10:19 David Klemm <davidklemm7511@...> wrote:
ESU Lok sound decoder

David Klemm
11 PRO Max

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> on behalf of Keith Elrod <elrodk73@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2019 9:10:32 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Disrict Buss
 
Sorry ... but what is a Lok?

Keith

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 9:56 AM thomasmclae via Groups.Io <mclae5-lists=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
With DCC, the criteria for separate power blocks is as follows:
1. Will you use more amps than you currently have on existing track block. 
2. Do you need to isolate shorts, to prevent one bad Lok from shutting down the entire block.

Note that if you have at least one block (Segment, district).

Amps, plan on 1/2 amp per Lok.  Actual usage varies per Lok, motor efficiency, length of train, up or down inclines, etc. Generally, 4-5 loks can run on each block.
Shorts are common with bad track, bad Loks (Especially steam!), operator errors. If you are having these issues, the more blocks the better.

One common pattern is to have the DCC system fees only boosters, not directly to the track. Makes the DCC system more stable, and last longer.

Note that with DCC, more than one operator can operate trains in any block. You just need the throttles.
Thomas
DeSoto, TX

Re: Disrict Buss

David Klemm
 

ESU Lok sound decoder

David Klemm
11 PRO Max


From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> on behalf of Keith Elrod <elrodk73@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2019 9:10:32 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Disrict Buss
 
Sorry ... but what is a Lok?

Keith

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 9:56 AM thomasmclae via Groups.Io <mclae5-lists=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
With DCC, the criteria for separate power blocks is as follows:
1. Will you use more amps than you currently have on existing track block. 
2. Do you need to isolate shorts, to prevent one bad Lok from shutting down the entire block.

Note that if you have at least one block (Segment, district).

Amps, plan on 1/2 amp per Lok.  Actual usage varies per Lok, motor efficiency, length of train, up or down inclines, etc. Generally, 4-5 loks can run on each block.
Shorts are common with bad track, bad Loks (Especially steam!), operator errors. If you are having these issues, the more blocks the better.

One common pattern is to have the DCC system fees only boosters, not directly to the track. Makes the DCC system more stable, and last longer.

Note that with DCC, more than one operator can operate trains in any block. You just need the throttles.
Thomas
DeSoto, TX

Re: Disrict Buss

Keith Elrod
 

Sorry ... but what is a Lok?

Keith

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 9:56 AM thomasmclae via Groups.Io <mclae5-lists=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
With DCC, the criteria for separate power blocks is as follows:
1. Will you use more amps than you currently have on existing track block. 
2. Do you need to isolate shorts, to prevent one bad Lok from shutting down the entire block.

Note that if you have at least one block (Segment, district).

Amps, plan on 1/2 amp per Lok.  Actual usage varies per Lok, motor efficiency, length of train, up or down inclines, etc. Generally, 4-5 loks can run on each block.
Shorts are common with bad track, bad Loks (Especially steam!), operator errors. If you are having these issues, the more blocks the better.

One common pattern is to have the DCC system fees only boosters, not directly to the track. Makes the DCC system more stable, and last longer.

Note that with DCC, more than one operator can operate trains in any block. You just need the throttles.
Thomas
DeSoto, TX

Re: Disrict Buss

thomasmclae
 

With DCC, the criteria for separate power blocks is as follows:
1. Will you use more amps than you currently have on existing track block. 
2. Do you need to isolate shorts, to prevent one bad Lok from shutting down the entire block.

Note that if you have at least one block (Segment, district).

Amps, plan on 1/2 amp per Lok.  Actual usage varies per Lok, motor efficiency, length of train, up or down inclines, etc. Generally, 4-5 loks can run on each block.
Shorts are common with bad track, bad Loks (Especially steam!), operator errors. If you are having these issues, the more blocks the better.

One common pattern is to have the DCC system fees only boosters, not directly to the track. Makes the DCC system more stable, and last longer.

Note that with DCC, more than one operator can operate trains in any block. You just need the throttles.
Thomas
DeSoto, TX

Re: DCC Bus distribution and snubbers question

Carl
 

Hi Gang:

I know 34 power districts sounds like a lot. But from a trouble shooting aspect, the more you can isolate a problem to a single small district the better. Even if the districts are served by the same booster or DCC circuit breaker. It makes it easier to divide and conquer.

On my layout I have 6 boosters and 12 power districts. Each district has one power switch ( AC / DCC ) and two breakers, which do trip sometimes. If there is a problem is it nice to reach the power switch and cut power to the district until the problem is solved.

Carl.

On 12/29/2019 1:52 AM, Mark Gurries wrote:

      
On Sep 20, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Blair & Rasa <smithbr@...> wrote:

Hi
I'm planning my DCC layout for my Algoma Central at this time.  I have located three boosters, each at the root of the three peninsulas. 
Each Booster will feed quad current limiters, either PM42s or something more recent. 
However, each limiter's output will feed multiple bus segments(e.g. one bus on the upper peninsula, one on the lower, each fed by the same limiter). 
As each of those runs will exceed 30’,

      
I am wondering if I need an RC snubber at the end of each, or should I put one at the output of the limiter, before we fan out to both runs?
End of each.  Placing them close to the booster defeats the purpose of the snubber.  The goal is to install them at the far end furthest tack bus wire wise away from the booster.

In the grand schema, we have 34 sections of bus to be fed; in some cases a limiter will feed up to four segments of track,
What is the difference between a section and segments?   

I like to use consistent terms.   This is what I THINK you saying.

1) You have 3 Booster Districts.  One Booster District per Peninsula.
2) A Peninsula has 2 levels.
3) You have 34 Power Districts
4) You are using quad output DCC circuit breakers.

I think this break up as follows.  

1) Average of about 34/3 ~  11 Power Districts / Booster.   
2) 3 Quad circuit breakers / Booster.
3) Each Level on a given peninula has between 5 or 6 power Districts.

This electrical design is for this large layout creates a unusually high number of power districts per booster.  That is to not say there is anything wrong.  Sounds like a lot of main line running and you getting the most coverage out of a given booster.

so if I have to put a snubber on each long run, the current drain will become significant, I think. 
It will consume about 2 HO locomotives worth.

You need 1 Snubber per power district.

Each snubber has a 100 Ohm resistor.

11 x 100 Ohm resistor in parallel  = 9 ohms.    12V / 9 Ohms = 1.32 Amps.

What you can do is replace the 100 Ohm resistor with a 200 Ohm.  The snubber will be weaker in effectiveness but still work.
 
Is it correct that I need to snub each long run, or is it effective to put a single snubber at the base of the branches?
Yes.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com






Re: Frog juicer as auto reverser with staggered pickup locomotives

Mark Gurries
 

No.

It should not matter.

Frog juicers work by detecting short circuits at the track level.  It happens when a metal flanged wheel bridges between rail connected to the frog and rail the feeds the frog.  That is independent of how the locomotive picks up track power.



On Dec 4, 2019, at 9:45 AM, Tom in Texas via Groups.Io <texpearson@...> wrote:

Is there an installation trick I could use to get the device to work with brass steam locomotives?

Tom in Texas 

Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Disrict Buss

Mark Gurries
 


On Dec 2, 2019, at 4:06 PM, ewoodley@... wrote:

I am breaking my layout into two districts. 
There is two question that actually never gets answered or if it does they don't use my lingo, or it just flies over my pee wee brain. Here goes the question. If you break your layout into districts do you need to run a separate buss wire for that district? 

Yes.

Buss wire = 2 wires, one for each rail.

You will need to install insulated rail joiners (gaps) in both rail to electrically separate the two power districts from each other.

If you have a loop of track, there will be two locations where you break both rails.

I am using a NCE starter set with the power cab. It puts out two amps max. 

The need for power districts comes down to how many trains you will be running at the same time or will you have more than one engineer running trains at the same time on the same layout.

If you are the only operator of the layout, Power Districts do not make much dollars and sense to implement.  What are you gaining or saving?

However there is only one slot to tie in your buss wire. So the second question would be (if the answer is yes, you need another buss for another district) where does the other buss wire get tied inn. 

You cannot properly implement a power district unless you have some kind of DCC circuit breaker.

The goal of the DCC circuit breaker is to shutdown a section of track power if it detects a short without shutting down your DCC system (powering the rest of the layout)

A DCC circuit breaker takes your DCC system track output power and breaks it up into Power Districts.

+—> DCC circuit Breaker #1 —> Power District 1.
PwrCab---+
+—> DCC circuit Breaker #2 —> Power District 2.

NCE offers the CP6 as a suitable DCC circuit breaker device for the PowerCab.
3rd party wise, you can also buy the PSX Circuit breaker and set it up specifically for the PowerCab.

The information on the CP6 can be found here:


To buy one go here:


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: DCC Bus distribution and snubbers question

Mark Gurries
 

On Sep 20, 2019, at 3:37 PM, Blair & Rasa <smithbr@...> wrote:

Hi
I'm planning my DCC layout for my Algoma Central at this time. I have located three boosters, each at the root of the three peninsulas.
Each Booster will feed quad current limiters, either PM42s or something more recent.
However, each limiter's output will feed multiple bus segments(e.g. one bus on the upper peninsula, one on the lower, each fed by the same limiter).
As each of those runs will exceed 30’,
I am wondering if I need an RC snubber at the end of each, or should I put one at the output of the limiter, before we fan out to both runs?
End of each. Placing them close to the booster defeats the purpose of the snubber. The goal is to install them at the far end furthest tack bus wire wise away from the booster.

In the grand schema, we have 34 sections of bus to be fed; in some cases a limiter will feed up to four segments of track,
What is the difference between a section and segments?

I like to use consistent terms. This is what I THINK you saying.

1) You have 3 Booster Districts. One Booster District per Peninsula.
2) A Peninsula has 2 levels.
3) You have 34 Power Districts
4) You are using quad output DCC circuit breakers.

I think this break up as follows.

1) Average of about 34/3 ~ 11 Power Districts / Booster.
2) 3 Quad circuit breakers / Booster.
3) Each Level on a given peninula has between 5 or 6 power Districts.

This electrical design is for this large layout creates a unusually high number of power districts per booster. That is to not say there is anything wrong. Sounds like a lot of main line running and you getting the most coverage out of a given booster.

so if I have to put a snubber on each long run, the current drain will become significant, I think.
It will consume about 2 HO locomotives worth.

You need 1 Snubber per power district.

Each snubber has a 100 Ohm resistor.

11 x 100 Ohm resistor in parallel = 9 ohms. 12V / 9 Ohms = 1.32 Amps.

What you can do is replace the 100 Ohm resistor with a 200 Ohm. The snubber will be weaker in effectiveness but still work.

Is it correct that I need to snub each long run, or is it effective to put a single snubber at the base of the branches?
Yes.


Best Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com

Re: Indicators for turnout position

Max Maginness
 

Nick

 

With the built  decoder  in the SMAIL the pins 1 and 8 connector do not have the same function as  1 and 8 on the basic tortoise and my suggestion does not apply.  While there is DC inside the unit to actually control the motor but you cannot get at it.  
Sorry about the further run around.

Max

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nick Ostrosky
Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2019 3:14 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Indicators for turnout position

 

Yes, basic green machine with the built-in decoder (I believe referred to as SMAIL).  No DC involved at all, I power these from the track bus so the Power Cab/JMRI/WI Throttle can throw them.

Re: Indicators for turnout position

Max Maginness
 

The Walthers system uses servo motors that operate differently from a Tortoise.  Servos  use   the three wire connection – common, power and control wires respectively. They are incompatible with the Tortoise design.
  

My best suggestions if you want DCC control are:  
 1)  go fully with the Walthers system  OR
 2) use the SMAILS with panel pushbuttons as shown in the diagram at the bottom  of page 3 of their  instructions and separately use   the switch contacts on pins 2,3,4 or 5,6,7 to control panel lights . This will need a separate power source for the lights.

There are other alternatives if you start with basic Tortoise machines but you may be committed with the SMAILS version  you have?

 

BTW it’s a bad idea to have the switch machines get their  operating power from the DCC bus unless you run a separate  one from that for track power. Otherwise a short on the track will also prevent moving the turnouts.

If you would like to discuss on the alternatives   please contact me off line.

 

Max

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Nick Ostrosky
Sent: Saturday, December 28, 2019 5:08 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Indicators for turnout position

 

It would probably help if I clarified further.  I did also purchase the Walthers distribution block 942-111, which I originally thought was DC only until last night when I realized is has 8 pins for I/O from a DCC device (e.g., my track power, and yes, don't I feel silly for not noticing this immediately).  It in turn has 8 three-wire outputs to power 8 turnouts.  Confusion point #1: why three wires to the turnout when only pins 1 and 8 on the Tortoise are used, acknowledging a Walthers turnout control may use this for other purposes (see 942-101 board image)?  Where would that third wire go on a Tortoise?  The way these are normally wired is distribution block to turnout, turnout to fascia button/LEDs.  My assumption at this point is the distribution block, and the Walthers turnout control, do "something" with that third wire, and I'm not seeing a clear equivalent to the Tortoise.

So, in short, is it possible to wire a Tortoise in the same fashion using these components, or is this all simply proprietary and works on Walthers only?  Thanks for helping, this should probably be a lot simpler than I'm making it.

Re: Indicators for turnout position

Nick Ostrosky
 

It would probably help if I clarified further.  I did also purchase the Walthers distribution block 942-111, which I originally thought was DC only until last night when I realized is has 8 pins for I/O from a DCC device (e.g., my track power, and yes, don't I feel silly for not noticing this immediately).  It in turn has 8 three-wire outputs to power 8 turnouts.  Confusion point #1: why three wires to the turnout when only pins 1 and 8 on the Tortoise are used, acknowledging a Walthers turnout control may use this for other purposes (see 942-101 board image)?  Where would that third wire go on a Tortoise?  The way these are normally wired is distribution block to turnout, turnout to fascia button/LEDs.  My assumption at this point is the distribution block, and the Walthers turnout control, do "something" with that third wire, and I'm not seeing a clear equivalent to the Tortoise.

So, in short, is it possible to wire a Tortoise in the same fashion using these components, or is this all simply proprietary and works on Walthers only?  Thanks for helping, this should probably be a lot simpler than I'm making it.

Re: Indicators for turnout position

Nick Ostrosky
 

Yes, basic green machine with the built-in decoder (I believe referred to as SMAIL).  No DC involved at all, I power these from the track bus so the Power Cab/JMRI/WI Throttle can throw them.

Re: Powering turntable and lights

Craig Zeni
 

How about simply programming the decoder so that the function outputs are non-directional?  I do it with my deciders.

Craig Zeni
Cary, NC
Despatched from my infernal Android

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 18:02 Max Maginness <m.maginness@...> wrote:

The white and yellow can just be tied together. That will leave the lights on controlled on/off by   F0. However the current capacity will be still limited by the decoder.   

max

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of wirefordcc
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 10:53 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] Powering turntable and lights

 

Monty,

I don't think you want to use the headlight (white wire) and rear light (yellow) for your yard and roundhouse lights.  These are tied to the forward and reverse direction of the locomotive.  Both usually can't be on at the same time and as you change direction of your turntable the lights will switch on an off.

For you yard and roundhouse lights, unless you feel compelled to control them with DCC, just wire them up to a switch.

Allan Gartner
Wiring For DCC 

Re: Powering turntable and lights

monty cunningham
 

DUH !!  I knew that!  Don't know what I was thinking.  Obviously I wasn't.
Thanks
Monty