Date   

Lack of speed

ianpreston4@...
 

Hello all;

First post...

I have fitted a TCS M1 decoder to a DC N scale KATO 10-173 651 Series “Super Hitachi” 

 

The train ran really well as a DC unit.

 

I only connected the red and black (track) and orange and grey (motor) wires.

 

I have an NCE Power Cab DCC system and the decoder is detected on the programming track.    It allows me to change the loco number, CVs etc.   Because of the internal lighting in the train the NCE detects a short when the whole train is on the programming track but it still allows programming.   When just the motor carriage is on the programming track there are no problems.

 

My problem is the speed that the train is running at.   As a DC unit it used to fly to the point that at full throttle it wouldn’t make the curves.   As a DCC unit it barely makes half of the speed it used to.

 

I timed the motor carriage only around a 7.6 meter loop and at 50% throttle it took 13.2 seconds.   At 100% it took 13 seconds.   In other words, virtually the same.

 

I set CV2 to 50, CV6 to 128, CV5 to 255 (from the factory defaults of 000) and it made no difference.

 

Am I missing something or are there other CVs to change to get a better performance?

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Ian


Re: MT N scale motor brush cap soldering

Perry A Pollino
 

Yes i am using default address of 03. I removed the decoder and put it on an ESU decoder tester and nothing there either. So a bad decoder I suppose.  Working on getting warranty waiting to here back from seller. ESU said I need to work through them. 
I am working in N scale I tried to clip the contact clips from the board after modifying the board did not work. They did not seem to make good contact.and I was worried about risk of shorting to the frame. 
The plug on the new ESU V 5 makes it a bit thicker that the V4. unfortunatly this is y first install and I do not have a v 4 to 

On Monday, November 25, 2019, 10:26:54 PM CST, Don Batman <donbatman1952@...> wrote:


are you using 003 as loco address? This is usually default address for
new decoders.
If the motor cap is broken - only motor should be affected. Light and
sound should still work.
proper way to solder motor wires is to leave a little bit of the
terminal sticking off of the actual top cap and solder to that bit and
not directly to the brush cap.
May be easier to get new motor than repair the one you have.




Re: wire strippers

Don Batman <donbatman1952@...>
 

I use Vice Grip brand automatic stripper for this. Think it came from
Lowes. Just feed the wire in and squeeze handles .


Re: MT N scale motor brush cap soldering

donbatman1952@...
 

are you using 003 as loco address? This is usually default address for
new decoders.
If the motor cap is broken - only motor should be affected. Light and
sound should still work.
proper way to solder motor wires is to leave a little bit of the
terminal sticking off of the actual top cap and solder to that bit and
not directly to the brush cap.
May be easier to get new motor than repair the one you have.


MT N scale motor brush cap soldering

Perry A Pollino
 

Folks,
I attempted to do my first N scale decoder install that was not a drop in.
It was a failure.
It is a ESU V5. The first mistake I made was not testing the decoder. so I am not sure if it is my installation or a bad decoder.
I am getting no lights, sound or movement. I have checked for voltage to the decoder with my RR ramp. so pick up is good. I have power to the decoder. Makes me think bad decoder.
However, That is not my reason to write this group.
I tried to solder to the brush cap. I think I may have overheated the cap. I tried high heat fast in an out but, i saw the cap move a bit. hence why I think I may have overheated it.
My question. How to remove a brush cap on Micro trains N scale motor?
If it makes a difference I have the MT FT. I have several I want to do. 
Thanks
Perry


Re: wire strippers

Greg Harter
 

Our club (25 years+) uses solder for track drops and some track joiners.  We have seen a few instances where (unsoldered) track joiners stop conducting electricity.  All other connections on the layout are with 12-wire nylon connectors(between 8-foot tables), Tortoise screw connectors, and of course many suitcase connectors.  The 12 wires conduct electricity for track buss, Tortoise buss, and accessory buss.

We have a large HO layout, four mainlines, two levels connected via a helix, and operate on DC and DCC.  We have DCC detector boards where mainlines are connected which will not permit crossovers to operate if both lines are not on the same current.  Easy to use and we have had no problems with this system, has been in operation for several years.

Greg Harter
Columbus Area Railroad Club
Columbus, Indiana


Re: wire strippers

thomasmclae
 

We have a 3000 Sqft layout at the club with soldering only inside control panels, turnout motor pigtails and track drops.
All buss wires connect to terminal strips between each table, with local power branching off with spade logs stacked on the terminal strips.
Track drops go to terminal strips within 6 inches, then fed to control panels with crimped spade lugs.

When we had some track drops backward and miss labeled, swapping connections took less than 1 minutes to unscrew and move wires. And no solder drippings either.
More options are available than melting metal.

Thomas
DeSoto, TX


Re: wire strippers

 

Vessel make a stripper that will probably do what you want.  It does not remove the insulation but if the insulation is compliant it will expose a section.

https://www.vesseltools.com/handtools/wirestrippers/3000-series-detail

I have had my for more than 30 years.

Best

Ken Harstine


Re: wire strippers

Blair
 

Carl
$.  At least in my case, stripping, wrapping, soldering costs me the $ of the solder - orders of magnitude less than even the cheapest suitcases.  Besides, I already bought the solder and the irons, years ago, so it's "free".  For hundreds of connections, it's worth it to learn robust soldering techniques.  I'd rather spend my RR budget elsewhere.

However, I do realize that's not everyone's take on the matter.  YMMV.
Blair

On 2019-11-23 9:05, Carl wrote:

Hi Gang:

Why strip the wires at all? You could use Insulation Displacement Connectors ( Suitcase Connectors ) or Insulation Displacement Screw Terminals:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Insulation-Displacement-Screw-Terminals/

I've wire a whole layout with these and they were great to work with. NMRA hosted a clinic on these at the Salt Lake City Convention last summer.

Best wishes, Carl.

On 11/23/2019 8:56 AM, wirefordcc wrote:
Hi Greg,

The wire stripper I show on my website at the link below will strip a wire in the middle of it.

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a26

I use it to expose wire in the middle of a bus run.  Obviously, in the middle, you can't remove the insulation.  It cuts the insulation and pushes it to one side.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC


Re: wire strippers

Carl
 

Hi Gang:

Why strip the wires at all? You could use Insulation Displacement Connectors ( Suitcase Connectors ) or Insulation Displacement Screw Terminals:

https://www.instructables.com/id/Insulation-Displacement-Screw-Terminals/

I've wire a whole layout with these and they were great to work with. NMRA hosted a clinic on these at the Salt Lake City Convention last summer.

Best wishes, Carl.

On 11/23/2019 8:56 AM, wirefordcc wrote:
Hi Greg,

The wire stripper I show on my website at the link below will strip a wire in the middle of it.

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a26

I use it to expose wire in the middle of a bus run.  Obviously, in the middle, you can't remove the insulation.  It cuts the insulation and pushes it to one side.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC


Re: wire strippers

Allan AE2V
 

Hi Greg,

The wire stripper I show on my website at the link below will strip a wire in the middle of it.

http://www.wiringfordcc.com/track_2.htm#a26

I use it to expose wire in the middle of a bus run.  Obviously, in the middle, you can't remove the insulation.  It cuts the insulation and pushes it to one side.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC


Re: wire strippers

Vincent Ficca
 

Hi Greg:


The wire strip I use is Klein tools 11061 wire stripper.  I use it to strip solid and stranded wire.  It works great on my layout bus wires that are stranded #12 and #14 gauge wire.  I solder all my track drops to the bus wire.
The wire strip does a gread job of stripping the wire in the middle and at the ends.  Small wire gauge I have done are telephone wire and CAT 5e 24/4 which I use for wiring my Tortoise switch machines, signaling etc..  Wire stripper will remove the cover of the CAT 5e wire and expose the 4 pair of wires, which I then remove with the same wire stripper. I remove the individual wire cover, exposing the solid wire for inserting into the wire holes at the end of the tortoise switch machine for soldering,  The other ends go into euro wire terminals.  FYI, I am building a large layout, so I have a lot of wirestripping done and to do.
I appreciate seeing the email question, because it remind me to order two more of the wire spripper on Amazon for $19.97 each, plus taxes. Free shipping with Amazon prime.
It is worth trying.

Vince

On Fri, Nov 22, 2019 at 5:08 PM Greg Smith <gcscls@...> wrote:
I have a number of 'standard' wire strippers to do anything from 8 to 24 size.  However, they are for stripping the end of wires.  Are there wire strippers for taking out just  a section of the sheath so I can add feeders to a long power buss?  I have tried doing it with a pocket knife.  It works but is time consuming and it does scratch/nick the wire.
Greg


Re: wire strippers

Paul O <pomilian@...>
 

Greg, the style of wire stripper is exactly what you need.
Simply do a Google search for wire strippers; they’re made by a number of manufacturers.

Paul O

In case the photo doesn’t come through, the link is below:


On Nov 22, 2019, at 5:08 PM, Greg Smith <gcscls@...> wrote:

I have a number of 'standard' wire strippers to do anything from 8 to 24 size.  However, they are for stripping the end of wires.  Are there wire strippers for taking out just  a section of the sheath so I can add feeders to a long power buss?  I have tried doing it with a pocket knife.  It works but is time consuming and it does scratch/nick the wire.
Greg


wire strippers

Greg Smith
 

I have a number of 'standard' wire strippers to do anything from 8 to 24 size.  However, they are for stripping the end of wires.  Are there wire strippers for taking out just  a section of the sheath so I can add feeders to a long power buss?  I have tried doing it with a pocket knife.  It works but is time consuming and it does scratch/nick the wire.
Greg


Re: Switch to Moderated Forum

Allan AE2V
 

The problem of off-topic postings to this forum appears to be solved.  I have lifted the moderation restriction for messages to this forum.

Thank you

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC


Re: Switch to Moderated Forum

Daniel Brewer
 

Hi Allan,

My original question was about the Peco crossing as it relates to a shorting problem while using my NCE system. I'm sorry it morphed into a hijacking of your forum, but I had thought I'd find an answer here more readily than the NCE forum. I did get an answer after the first couple of replies, but it just kept going...

Dan


Re: Switch to Moderated Forum

J. Frank Ervin
 

Thank you Allan for moving this along..
JFE

On Tue, Nov 19, 2019 at 6:58 PM wirefordcc <bigboy@...> wrote:

Out of respect of those follow the guidelines of this forum, due to messages being posted to this forum that do not pertain to DCC wiring, I am switching the forum to be a moderated one until further notice.

Allan

Wiring for DCC


Switch to Moderated Forum

Allan AE2V
 

Out of respect of those follow the guidelines of this forum, due to messages being posted to this forum that do not pertain to DCC wiring, I am switching the forum to be a moderated one until further notice.

Allan

Wiring for DCC


Re: PECO Code 100 24 Degree Crossing: Shorting Issue

Brian Eiland
 

Yesterday I discovered a problem with some of my NEW Peco crossovers. Four of my new Pecos had problems,...2 had plastic joiners in a few of the tracks had 'dips' in them, and 2 of them had little tip projections into the flangeway.

These were discovered when I experimenting with running a model 6 axle tender over them. Granted the flanges on these wheels were ever so larger than standards these days, but it was just enough to cause them to bump way up in the air as they encountered these blips in the flangeways. And I double rechecked the gauge on these wheel sets, and they were right on.

 


 


Re: PECO Code 100 24 Degree Crossing: Shorting Issue

Brian Eiland
 

OK found that posting here,..

Yesterday I discovered a problem with some of my NEW Peco crossings. Four of my new Pecos had problems,...2 had plastic joiners in a few of the tracks had 'dips' in them, and 2 of them had little tip projections into the flangeway.

These were discovered when I experimenting with running a model 6 axle tender over them. Granted the flanges on these wheels were ever so larger than standards these days, but it was just enough to cause them to bump way up in the air as they encountered these blips in the flangeways. And I double rechecked the gauge on these wheel sets, and they were right on.

 


 


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