Date   
programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

What are CV's and how do I program them ?

Re: programming CV

Brian Lewis
 

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:
What are CV's and how do I program them ?
--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

Richard_vanRaay
 

aThanks for taking the time to write such a detailed response. I learnt a lot.
Cheers.
Richrd.

Re: programming CV

Tom G.
 

Brian,

Thank you. Very informative. Good info to save. 

Thanks.
Tom

On May 18, 2019, at 6:11 AM, Brian Lewis <brian@...> wrote:

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:
What are CV's and how do I program them ?
--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

vincent marino
 

I concur with Bryan educate yourself on JMRI and all your CV issues and even ones you didn't know you had (consist) will be resolved. 


On Sat, May 18, 2019, 9:37 AM Brian Lewis <brian@...> wrote:

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:
What are CV's and how do I program them ?
--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

Brian,

Kudos for writing this so clearly.  I have been learning about CVs by trial and error (mostly error), and most of what I have read on the subject is pitched above my head.  Your note is a great guide for beginners like me.  I am saving it for future reference.

Thanks

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Lewis
Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2019 6:11 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] programming CV

 

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:

What are CV's and how do I program them ?

--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

PennsyNut
 

I concur with all. But need to add. The first thing I did when starting with a new loco fresh from the mfgr, imptr. On a programming track, using either Page or Direct, reset the loco number from 3 to whatever you want, usually the loco number. That's about 99%. Then, while on programming track, read the CV's for those basic ones, CV 3,4,5&6. "Write them down". What I tried doing at first, was to go ahead an change some. But found it better to just leave the loco number on and take the engine to the running track. Using Ops mode, change one number at a time. Example was CV 5. When satisfied you have the right number in CV 5, "Write it down". Then do CV 6. Same, when satisfied, WRITE IT DOWN. Continue on with CV 3 & 4. When done with these 4 (CV 5, 6, 3, 4). Leave the engine alone. Play with it. Run it until you are totally satisfied. Those numbers written down, the original and your choices. They are you bible. Retain in someplace secure. I use a binder for the paper and also an excel file on the PC. All back up. The other CV's can wait until you are more comfortable with them. IMHO, that's as far as I went. Even with my sound loco. My next step with the sound loco is the bell and whistle. Those require the locos manual to get the right CV's. Again though, before changing any others, go back to the programming track and read the original settings for each CV you are interested in. Be sure to record/write/input on PC. I can not emphasize this enough! Now this should help everyone. And if you disagree, please do so.
Morgan Bilbo, still learning, but getting better at DCC

Re: programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

Many, Many thanks for all the information. However, the DCC engine came with a CD and has  All of the CV"s listed.  I just don't know how to get into them.  I am using a Digitrax control system.  Thanks again for your help
Lee

Re: programming CV

Tom O'Hara
 

 Hi...

I would strongly recommend that you search for one of the books on introductory DCC. Then study the section on how to program CVs until you are comfortable with changing one and what is accomplished when you do change one. After that, practice when one engine until you are comfortable with the process. You can always reset the engine and start over with the factory settings, but you need to know how to do the reset.... which is part of the "how to set CVs." 

It would be very handy to have someone near that you could visit or someone you could call on the phone. You could be talked through the setting CV process in a few minutes.

Then you can get into the pros and cons of setting particular CVs, which is highly engine-dependent and highly personal. This is basically play-time where you can do it with the throttle of your system, or you can get into JMRI (not essential but convenient for many folks.)

Once you are really relaxed about changing CVs, you can spend lots of time listening to and watching the results of your changes. You'll probably want to start with adjusting volumes and whistle/horn choices, but then you'll find about 12 zillion modifications you can do. Ignore these until you are comfortable with the basics. Then maybe you can try Brian's suggestions and move on to others.

...Tom

--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Tom O'Hara
 

I felt that might be the problem. So let me say again, that you need to find a human that will do it in person or get on the phone with you. I have done this more than once with EasyDCC and NCE, with which I am familiar. But a couple of times, a friend has called me about Digitrax; and I have dug into the manual on line to find out how to do it. We got him going via the phone. So see if you can find that Digitrax stranger/friend to get on the phone and let him talk you through it. Seriously,  10-15 minutes and you'll have the idea. You will then be able to start playing. 

Incidentally, please not me. I am tired of having to relearn Digitrax every year or two. Two systems are enough to keep me confused!

Happy trails!

...Tom

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 11:08 AM Lee Phillips <leenbeau@...> wrote:
Many, Many thanks for all the information. However, the DCC engine came with a CD and has  All of the CV"s listed.  I just don't know how to get into them.  I am using a Digitrax control system.  Thanks again for your help
Lee



--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

Thanks, Tom
By trial and error and going over and over the CD that came with unit, I am slowly picking it up
I am 83 and slow to pick up on some of this computer world.
Got lazy with my O ga.
I promise I want call you😉😉
Lee
Regards,

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 1:45 PM Tom O'Hara <tomohara5@...> wrote:
I felt that might be the problem. So let me say again, that you need to find a human that will do it in person or get on the phone with you. I have done this more than once with EasyDCC and NCE, with which I am familiar. But a couple of times, a friend has called me about Digitrax; and I have dug into the manual on line to find out how to do it. We got him going via the phone. So see if you can find that Digitrax stranger/friend to get on the phone and let him talk you through it. Seriously,  10-15 minutes and you'll have the idea. You will then be able to start playing. 

Incidentally, please not me. I am tired of having to relearn Digitrax every year or two. Two systems are enough to keep me confused!

Happy trails!

...Tom

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 11:08 AM Lee Phillips <leenbeau@...> wrote:
Many, Many thanks for all the information. However, the DCC engine came with a CD and has  All of the CV"s listed.  I just don't know how to get into them.  I am using a Digitrax control system.  Thanks again for your help
Lee



--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

Got it !
And thanks again

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 12:09 PM Tom O'Hara <tomohara5@...> wrote:
 Hi...

I would strongly recommend that you search for one of the books on introductory DCC. Then study the section on how to program CVs until you are comfortable with changing one and what is accomplished when you do change one. After that, practice when one engine until you are comfortable with the process. You can always reset the engine and start over with the factory settings, but you need to know how to do the reset.... which is part of the "how to set CVs." 

It would be very handy to have someone near that you could visit or someone you could call on the phone. You could be talked through the setting CV process in a few minutes.

Then you can get into the pros and cons of setting particular CVs, which is highly engine-dependent and highly personal. This is basically play-time where you can do it with the throttle of your system, or you can get into JMRI (not essential but convenient for many folks.)

Once you are really relaxed about changing CVs, you can spend lots of time listening to and watching the results of your changes. You'll probably want to start with adjusting volumes and whistle/horn choices, but then you'll find about 12 zillion modifications you can do. Ignore these until you are comfortable with the basics. Then maybe you can try Brian's suggestions and move on to others.

...Tom

--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

PennsyNut
 

Lee: being 83 is not a bad thing. I'm 80. And had been an armchair modeler for too many years. Just restarted a new layout and DCC. And that's why I wrote about how I went about it. Using online tools can help, and I worked my way through the CV's with just the manuals and YouTube. Check for online videos that show how.  I have a Zephyr and do those CV's one at a time. No fancy computer stuff - yet! And no one to come and help me. So if I can do it, so can you!
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Programming

Michael Shockley
 

To Lee Phillips 

For Digitrax you need a DT400 or 402 throttle. Plug it in to the loconet. Power on the system. Put the loco on the track. Press the PRGM button and look at the throttle display window. 
For main track programming, it should show Po. If you’re using a programming track the choices are PH, Pd, Pg. To change between these keep pressing the PRGM button. Some decoders respond better to one over another. 
To choose which CV turn the left knob. To set the value turn the right knob.
Hope this gets you started. 
Mike Shockley 

Re: Programming

John Johnston <towboatjohnston@...>
 

Lee,

 

I also am a beginner at CVs on a Digitrax layout.  I struggled to program CVs with my DT402 throttle.  I have found using JMRI on my laptop to be MUCH easier and less confusion.  JMRI is free, but I had to buy a PR4 to connect my laptop to a short length of dedicated programming track.  It was well worth  the investment.

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Michael Shockley via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, May 19, 2019 1:47 PM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: [w4dccqa] Programming

 

To Lee Phillips 

For Digitrax you need a DT400 or 402 throttle. Plug it in to the loconet. Power on the system. Put the loco on the track. Press the PRGM button and look at the throttle display window. 

For main track programming, it should show Po. If you’re using a programming track the choices are PH, Pd, Pg. To change between these keep pressing the PRGM button. Some decoders respond better to one over another. 

To choose which CV turn the left knob. To set the value turn the right knob.

Hope this gets you started. 
Mike Shockley 

K.I.S.S.

PennsyNut
 

I want to address a problem I see. Not specifically this forum. But when someone asks a question, has a problem, etc. Why do the responses all seem to be: 1> over a beginners head. 2> involve spending money. 3> and sometimes confuse the original requestor. I see this a lot. A man asks about CV's and he gets told to buy a PR4 or it's equivalent to get JMRI and JAVA. Yes, that's good advice, but that isn't what the requester asked. And since I'm guessing that most requester's are novices or beginners, why overload them with future advice. I did respond about CV's in a K.I.S.S. manner because that's what I thought the original request was for. Not to go buy more. A DC402 is NOT required. A PR4 is NOT required. The simple Zephyr or whatever will suffice until the beginner/novice/requester get his/her feet wet. After a bit of experiment, and a little more confidence, he/she can then decide on Decoder Pro or whatever. Sorry for this if it offends anyone. I do not intend to do that. I only request that y'all be considerate of other people. And don't "over-answer" with advice that is premature.
JMRI is a great product, so is downloading JAVA, and so is buying a PR4/or equivalent.
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Re: K.I.S.S.

george hohon3
 

Spot on comments. I too am amazed at how many responses don't even address the requestor's question or inquiry.  It's like they didn't even read the post, or if they did, they just want show their level of ignorance.


On May 20, 2019, at 9:51 AM, PennsyNut <pennsynut@...> wrote:

I want to address a problem I see. Not specifically this forum. But when someone asks a question, has a problem, etc. Why do the responses all seem to be: 1> over a beginners head. 2> involve spending money. 3> and sometimes confuse the original requestor. I see this a lot. A man asks about CV's and he gets told to buy a PR4 or it's equivalent to get JMRI and JAVA. Yes, that's good advice, but that isn't what the requester asked. And since I'm guessing that most requester's are novices or beginners, why overload them with future advice. I did respond about CV's in a K.I.S.S. manner because that's what I thought the original request was for. Not to go buy more. A DC402 is NOT required. A PR4 is NOT required. The simple Zephyr or whatever will suffice until the beginner/novice/requester get his/her feet wet. After a bit of experiment, and a little more confidence, he/she can then decide on Decoder Pro or whatever. Sorry for this if it offends anyone. I do not intend to do that. I only request that y'all be considerate of other people. And don't "over-answer" with advice that is premature.
JMRI is a great product, so is downloading JAVA, and so is buying a PR4/or equivalent.
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Re: K.I.S.S.

David Klemm
 

Morgan

How is telling a person something that requires an understanding of hexadecimal and bits simpler?  Obviously he didn’t know what he didn’t know but giving advice on a solution that allows the use of plain English versus bits is a simpler solution.  Sure the person could have done a better job of leading the person with the question to that conclusion by showing what it means to have to program the ‘old’ fashioned way. 

David Klemm
Xs Max


From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> on behalf of PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 11:52
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: [w4dccqa] K.I.S.S.
 
I want to address a problem I see. Not specifically this forum. But when someone asks a question, has a problem, etc. Why do the responses all seem to be: 1> over a beginners head. 2> involve spending money. 3> and sometimes confuse the original requestor. I see this a lot. A man asks about CV's and he gets told to buy a PR4 or it's equivalent to get JMRI and JAVA. Yes, that's good advice, but that isn't what the requester asked. And since I'm guessing that most requester's are novices or beginners, why overload them with future advice. I did respond about CV's in a K.I.S.S. manner because that's what I thought the original request was for. Not to go buy more. A DC402 is NOT required. A PR4 is NOT required. The simple Zephyr or whatever will suffice until the beginner/novice/requester get his/her feet wet. After a bit of experiment, and a little more confidence, he/she can then decide on Decoder Pro or whatever. Sorry for this if it offends anyone. I do not intend to do that. I only request that y'all be considerate of other people. And don't "over-answer" with advice that is premature.
JMRI is a great product, so is downloading JAVA, and so is buying a PR4/or equivalent.
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Re: K.I.S.S.

Tom O'Hara
 

I'm afraid that we are getting close to causing grief here, but there is a significant point to be made. Programming can be done easily with the basic DCC system. There is no need for hexadecimal or bits. It can be done with standard base-ten numbers. As I said previously, I have done this on three different systems. (And I do comprehend hex.)

Later, if he wants to add Decoder Pro, it will still be there. I don't want to argue the pros and cons of approaching the programming by different methods. That's starting to sound like the start of a war. But is IS easy to program with a command station and a throttle. I do it all the time, and I do have Decoder Pro available for times when I want to use it.

.....Tom

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 1:24 PM David Klemm <davidklemm7511@...> wrote:
Morgan

How is telling a person something that requires an understanding of hexadecimal and bits simpler?  Obviously he didn’t know what he didn’t know but giving advice on a solution that allows the use of plain English versus bits is a simpler solution.  Sure the person could have done a better job of leading the person with the question to that conclusion by showing what it means to have to program the ‘old’ fashioned way. 

David Klemm
Xs Max

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> on behalf of PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 11:52
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: [w4dccqa] K.I.S.S.
 
I want to address a problem I see. Not specifically this forum. But when someone asks a question, has a problem, etc. Why do the responses all seem to be: 1> over a beginners head. 2> involve spending money. 3> and sometimes confuse the original requestor. I see this a lot. A man asks about CV's and he gets told to buy a PR4 or it's equivalent to get JMRI and JAVA. Yes, that's good advice, but that isn't what the requester asked. And since I'm guessing that most requester's are novices or beginners, why overload them with future advice. I did respond about CV's in a K.I.S.S. manner because that's what I thought the original request was for. Not to go buy more. A DC402 is NOT required. A PR4 is NOT required. The simple Zephyr or whatever will suffice until the beginner/novice/requester get his/her feet wet. After a bit of experiment, and a little more confidence, he/she can then decide on Decoder Pro or whatever. Sorry for this if it offends anyone. I do not intend to do that. I only request that y'all be considerate of other people. And don't "over-answer" with advice that is premature.
JMRI is a great product, so is downloading JAVA, and so is buying a PR4/or equivalent.
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC



--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Mike Hoggard
 

Well done Morgan. I am 87 on Saturday and am building my first model rail layout in the loft. It is 12ft x 15 ft. And I use Roco multiemaus as my system. I might upgrade later. I have 30 locomotives fitted with decoders and four of them with sound. My biggest problem theseays is reading the small print in instruction manuals. I can still climb the loft ladder into the loft so that,s good. Mike Hoggard
--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 19/5/19, PennsyNut <pennsynut@...> wrote:
Q
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] programming CV
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Date: Sunday, 19 May, 2019, 16:21

Lee: being 83 is not a
bad thing. I'm 80. And had been an armchair modeler for
too many years. Just restarted a new layout and DCC. And
that's why I wrote about how I went about it. Using
online tools can help, and I worked my way through the
CV's with just the manuals and YouTube. Check for online
videos that show how.  I have a Zephyr and do those
CV's one at a time. No fancy computer stuff - yet! And
no one to come and help me. So if I can do it, so can
you!
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC