Date   
Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Dennis Cherry
 

The only one that seems available right now is the double slips.

https://www.amazon.com/Peco-SL-U8382-Double-Turnout-Unifrog/dp/B01EUACBJ8

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Don Vollrath
 

I agree. If it works there is no reason to change.
DonV

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

redking56@...
 

The Peco Double Slip Unifrog is excellent. It is, indeed, "easy to use and install" (and wire).

I recently purchases four of them as part of my passenger station track complex.

Rich

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Dennis Cherry
 

i think this might be a mistake in pricing here:

https://tonystrains.com/product/peco-sl-u8364-ho-code-83-with-unifrog-6-crossing/

A good buy .

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Keith Elrod
 

Modeltrainstuff.com has it at $32.99 and Trainmastermodels.com (Buford, GA) has it at $23.37. I shop both these stores on a regular basis.

Keith

On Sep 28, 2018, at 8:22 AM, Dennis Cherry <dbcherry@...> wrote:

i think this might be a mistake in pricing here:

https://tonystrains.com/product/peco-sl-u8364-ho-code-83-with-unifrog-6-crossing/

A good buy .

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Rob Powers
 

Awesome, and thanks. 

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Tom Stephens
 

This link is for a #6 crossing – not a double slip switch.
I would expect it to be cheaper.
Tom
 

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

redking56@...
 

Yes, the double slip will cost you over $80.

Rich

Re: Wiring For DCC Update Announcement

Kurt Konrath
 

A lot less if you build your own!

But much easier to buy one!

I hand lay most of my switches with Fast Track jigs. 

Kurt


On Sep 28, 2018, at 4:29 PM, redking56@... wrote:

Yes, the double slip will cost you over $80.

Rich

Hornby Pendolo digital

Richard Sutcliffe
 

One of the new members of our club, recently from the UK, brought in a Hornby Pendolino set. 
The packaging has reference to “Digital” & "NMRA Dcc” as well as NMRA compatible.

When placed on a Digitrax programming track there no acknowledgement (na).
Looking inside there is a mother board with another board plugged into a 7 pin socket.

Am I right in assuming the second board, with a number of components, simply bridges the motor to the track?

The unit does run on straight DC, but there is no response on DCC address 3, 1, 2, or 12.

Dick Sutcliffe
Secretary
Dewdney-Alouette Railway Society

Re: Hornby Pendolo digital

Theo van Riet
 




Op 3 okt. 2018, om 07:04 heeft Richard Sutcliffe <ras1@...> het volgende geschreven:


When placed on a Digitrax programming track there no acknowledgement (na).
Looking inside there is a mother board with another board plugged into a 7 pin socket.

Am I right in assuming the second board, with a number of components, simply bridges the motor to the track?



The board, plugged in the 7pin socket has to be replaced by a decoder of his choice, then it will start reacting on digital signals.
This looks to me as an analog train, prepared for digital…

Theo


--                 
Greetings from the heath in the north of Belgium 




Re: Hornby Pendolo digital

Richard Sutcliffe
 

Thanks Theo

Kinda what I figured.

Guess we would have to hard wire - the 7 pin stock is not a recognized DCC configuration.

On Oct 3, 2018, at 1:25 AM, Theo van Riet <tvanriet@...> wrote:




Op 3 okt. 2018, om 07:04 heeft Richard Sutcliffe <ras1@...> het volgende geschreven:


When placed on a Digitrax programming track there no acknowledgement (na).
Looking inside there is a mother board with another board plugged into a 7 pin socket.

Am I right in assuming the second board, with a number of components, simply bridges the motor to the track?



The board, plugged in the 7pin socket has to be replaced by a decoder of his choice, then it will start reacting on digital signals.
This looks to me as an analog train, prepared for digital…

Theo


--                 
Greetings from the heath in the north of Belgium 





Dick Sutcliffe

Secretary
Dewdney-Alouette Railway Society


Turnout position

General
 

Hi Folks!  I am new here and at age 81 decided to get into N scale.  What is the best way to feed turnout position info to Railroad.com software using KATO turnouts with NCE switch kat decoders?                                     
Allan

Re: Turnout position

Don Vollrath
 

If you are using the NCE Switch Kat decoders be sure to look at https://ncedcc.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/200918205-Switch-Kat-for-Kato-Lemaco-or-LGB-remote-control-turnouts. They already have an indicator output. Then substitute in either one or two opto-isolators instead of the LEDs or incandescent lamps shown in the diagrams to indicate the last known turnout position . As other have said, then use the open collector output(s) of the opto-isolators to activate the input(s) of your favorite type of input device to get to Railroad.com software on your PC.

DonV  

Rotary switch

susanhubby01@...
 

Hello,

Can someone recommend a rotary switch for a yard ladder in HO scale?
Thanks
Brett Johnson


--
Brett Johnson

Re: Rotary switch

john
 

Switch machines are not high current so almost any rotary switch should work. It does need to be Brake before make so it doesn't activate two switches at once. If more than one turnout is going to operate at a position, you will need 2 decks, 3 turnouts require 3 decks. 
If you are using slow machines, there are three ways to operate them:
(1) You can use a split transformer with a single common. Each power lead will power a switch in a different direction. Same as above, the maximum number of turnouts operated, decides the number of decks. (This is by far the cheapest way to operate a ladder.) 
(2) Another way to do it is to operate relays to throw turnouts. you only need one deck but the paths are controlled by a diode matrix.
Either method is incredibly simple to operate one turn out, but becomes progressively more difficult with the addition of turnouts. 
(3) You could operate them with a computer and there are programs available but IO devices get pricy. 
Information on all three of the systems are available on the website. 
Twin coil machines seem to work well with push buttons and center sprung toggle switches if you have a sufficient power supply to operate the maximum number of switches needed. 
Oh, the rotary switches, check at your electronics surplus, new switches are pricy. Don't look for the exact number of positions you need, you don't have to use them all. Many relays allow extra positions to be blocked. 
The most important decisions is going to be made at some point when something stops working, which system are you going to be able to fix.
Wow, it looks like I complicated your life. 
jd


On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 9:42 PM, Brett Johnson via Groups.Io <susanhubby01@...> wrote:


Hello,

Can someone recommend a rotary switch for a yard ladder in HO scale?
Thanks
Brett Johnson


--
Brett Johnson





Peco Unifrog

wirefordcc
 

I was able to examine a N-scale Peco Unifrog RH turnout today.

It bears resemblance to Peco's Insulfrog.  It has a small frog made of rail that you could presumably leave unpowered.  Or you can power it with the attached frog wire.  I also like that the stock and closure rails already have a connection between them.  You won't need insulated joiners on the frog rails like you do with the Electrofrog.

I will try to create a diagram and wiring instructions this weekend.  If it doesn't happen, be patient; I have a lot on my plate.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC

Re: Rotary switch

Brett Johnson <susanhubby01@...>
 

Thanks for responding, I should have mentioned that I am a beginner when it applies to wiring model railroads, I understood very little of what you said, what are decks, only thing I know for sure about DCC is two wires to the track, everything else I’m looking for books on wiring turnouts, slow motion tortoise switches, etc
Brett 


On Oct 10, 2018, at 11:10 PM, john <john.p.dunn@...> wrote:

Switch machines are not high current so almost any rotary switch should work. It does need to be Brake before make so it doesn't activate two switches at once. If more than one turnout is going to operate at a position, you will need 2 decks, 3 turnouts require 3 decks. 
If you are using slow machines, there are three ways to operate them:
(1) You can use a split transformer with a single common. Each power lead will power a switch in a different direction. Same as above, the maximum number of turnouts operated, decides the number of decks. (This is by far the cheapest way to operate a ladder.) 
(2) Another way to do it is to operate relays to throw turnouts. you only need one deck but the paths are controlled by a diode matrix.
Either method is incredibly simple to operate one turn out, but becomes progressively more difficult with the addition of turnouts. 
(3) You could operate them with a computer and there are programs available but IO devices get pricy. 
Information on all three of the systems are available on the website. 
Twin coil machines seem to work well with push buttons and center sprung toggle switches if you have a sufficient power supply to operate the maximum number of switches needed. 
Oh, the rotary switches, check at your electronics surplus, new switches are pricy. Don't look for the exact number of positions you need, you don't have to use them all. Many relays allow extra positions to be blocked. 
The most important decisions is going to be made at some point when something stops working, which system are you going to be able to fix.
Wow, it looks like I complicated your life. 
jd


On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 9:42 PM, Brett Johnson via Groups.Io <susanhubby01@...> wrote:


Hello,

Can someone recommend a rotary switch for a yard ladder in HO scale?
Thanks
Brett Johnson


--
Brett Johnson






--
Brett Johnson

Re: Rotary switch

john
 

Brett,
First, you can look up old articles of Model Railroader on line. There are some amazing articles on all sorts of wiring and they have the staff to make very understandable drawings. Wiring for DCC has amazing resources but they are a little more detailed and the drawings while practical are a little more difficult.
OK, a rotary switch consists of a fiber (sometimes ceramic) disk with contacts around its edge, a wiper attached to a rod (axle), and mounting hardware. The disk and wiper are sometimes referred to as a deck, and a multi deck rotary has more than one deck mounted on the axle. 
Something else you have to take into consideration is that your wiring has to be terminated. Barrier strips are the most common and fairly cheap but there are new connectors that are a tube with a clamp in the front and in the rear. They come in strips up to (I have seen) 20 connectors and they are easily to separate. More convenient but a little more expensive.
I am in Dayton, Ohio. Where are you located.



On Thursday, October 11, 2018 10:45 PM, Brett Johnson via Groups.Io <susanhubby01@...> wrote:


Thanks for responding, I should have mentioned that I am a beginner when it applies to wiring model railroads, I understood very little of what you said, what are decks, only thing I know for sure about DCC is two wires to the track, everything else I’m looking for books on wiring turnouts, slow motion tortoise switches, etc
Brett 


On Oct 10, 2018, at 11:10 PM, john <john.p.dunn@...> wrote:

Switch machines are not high current so almost any rotary switch should work. It does need to be Brake before make so it doesn't activate two switches at once. If more than one turnout is going to operate at a position, you will need 2 decks, 3 turnouts require 3 decks. 
If you are using slow machines, there are three ways to operate them:
(1) You can use a split transformer with a single common. Each power lead will power a switch in a different direction. Same as above, the maximum number of turnouts operated, decides the number of decks. (This is by far the cheapest way to operate a ladder.) 
(2) Another way to do it is to operate relays to throw turnouts. you only need one deck but the paths are controlled by a diode matrix.
Either method is incredibly simple to operate one turn out, but becomes progressively more difficult with the addition of turnouts. 
(3) You could operate them with a computer and there are programs available but IO devices get pricy. 
Information on all three of the systems are available on the website. 
Twin coil machines seem to work well with push buttons and center sprung toggle switches if you have a sufficient power supply to operate the maximum number of switches needed. 
Oh, the rotary switches, check at your electronics surplus, new switches are pricy. Don't look for the exact number of positions you need, you don't have to use them all. Many relays allow extra positions to be blocked. 
The most important decisions is going to be made at some point when something stops working, which system are you going to be able to fix.
Wow, it looks like I complicated your life. 
jd


On Wednesday, October 10, 2018 9:42 PM, Brett Johnson via Groups.Io <susanhubby01@...> wrote:


Hello,

Can someone recommend a rotary switch for a yard ladder in HO scale?
Thanks
Brett Johnson


--
Brett Johnson






--
Brett Johnson

Re: Rotary switch

wirefordcc
 

Brett,

With DCC, you don't have to wire a yard ladder with a rotary switch unless you really want to.  If complexity is a problem for you, I suggest that you don't worry about using a rotary switch.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC