Date   
Re: Wiring for DCC Topics Only Please

oldgrunt1cav@...
 

Amen  Allan and Amen !!!! 

I'm 87 years and need all the help I can get w/o distractions.  Just about ready to start wiring for DCC on a 16 x 60 ft layout.  (  Hopefully, the grim
reaper stays away).  Where can contributions be sent to enable the continued support of this program for future generations? Thanks for advising.

Re: Hello

David Hartley <hartleycom@...>
 

Dale hello
Thanks for this top tip. 
Unfortunately I’ve experienced an intervention during fitting requiring me to catch the Caledonian Sleeper to Dundee pulled by 90 043 and now returning on the 11:07 to Kings Cross class 43 having just left Newcastle all First Class. Life can be tough at times  but the Senior Card helps! I’ll let you know what happens when I flick the switch. 
Best
David 

by Virgin Mail

On 11 Jun 2018, at 3:58 pm, Dale Gloer <dale.gloer@...> wrote:

David,

all the best tips for Peco Electrofrog are covered in the wiringfordcc website.  Here is the link to the Peco section.
http://www.wiringfordcc.com/switches_peco.htm

Dale Gloer

Problem with reversing Section

Timothy Holmes
 

Hi Folks:

Not sure what is happening here -- I have a reversing loop, with an isolated section.  As the loco enters the section it stops.  The track shows 15VAC, but the engine goes completely dead.  Im headed out to do some more troubleshooting, but thought I'd get a couple messages out in hopes of some suggestions

Thanks
TIM
--

Tim 

San Luis and Rio Grande

Re: Problem with reversing Section

john
 

   You didn't mention what kind of reverser you are using so your help will be general.
   The input to the reverser is your non-isolated track and the output to the reversing section. Your instructions tell you where to install each wire but I think you have your output pair reversed. 
   You can verify your wiring with "wiring for DCC" information although maybe not you specific reverser. Once you figure out the first on you are an expert and you can install everyone's.
john


On Saturday, June 16, 2018 1:22 PM, Timothy Holmes <taholmes160@...> wrote:


Hi Folks:

Not sure what is happening here -- I have a reversing loop, with an isolated section.  As the loco enters the section it stops.  The track shows 15VAC, but the engine goes completely dead.  Im headed out to do some more troubleshooting, but thought I'd get a couple messages out in hopes of some suggestions

Thanks
TIM
--
Tim 
San Luis and Rio Grande



Detecting shorts?

Robert Wilson
 

Hi - many sites recommend using a homemade short circuit detection buzzer while laying track. I’m wondering if a continuity setting on a multimeter would accomplish the same thing? In other words, if you connected a lead to each rail and you had crossed your wires, would the continuity beep on the multimeter indicating that you had a flow of current from one rail to the other? Or would that not work?

Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0

Douglas Harrison <sd90mach@...>
 

I have a interesting problem with this loco. Some months ago it was knocked off my work bench and hit the concrete floor. The only damage I could find, at the time, was the hold down peg under the cab floor was broken off. Repaired that, put it all back together and tried a test run. It jerked, hesitated and would not preform well as it used to. The loco and tender were not joined together, only the loco came to grief!!
I packed it up and put it away and a couple of days ago decided to have a really good investigation to see if I could work out what was causing the erratic running. Stripped it down to it's basic units, tested the motor and side frames and the motor ran very smoothly. Check the running gear, it had no problems, put these two sub assemblies back together and all ran smoothly. Coupled the tender and loco back together and the same problem was there. The only thing I can put this down to is that there is an intermittent break in one of the cables between the two components, if so how does one repair these. The price of these parts from Bachmann is reasonable, but the international shipping rates are outlandish.
Ant one have any thoughts or ideas on how to fix this.
Thanks
Douglas Harrison
Christchurch
New Zealand.

Re: Detecting shorts?

Paul O
 

Yes Rob, that will work.

Paul O

On Jun 19, 2018, at 4:50 PM, robwwilson@... wrote:

Hi - many sites recommend using a homemade short circuit detection buzzer while laying track. I’m wondering if a continuity setting on a multimeter would accomplish the same thing? In other words, if you connected a lead to each rail and you had crossed your wires, would the continuity beep on the multimeter indicating that you had a flow of current from one rail to the other? Or would that not work?

Re: Detecting shorts?

Dennis Cherry
 

Yes, I use that method. One point you also have to know is some DVM’s have a timer and will turn the DVM off after a given time of none use.

 

A buzzer and battery is a better chose for long periods of time between making polarity connection checks.

 

Dennis Cherry

 

Created on my Desktop PC.

 

Re: Detecting shorts?

Glenn
 

Are you using the meter intermittently? Leaving it on will run down the battery quickly.

I recommend making the buzzer and clipping it to the rails or better, the main track connection with alligator clips. It will always be "on" so when a short occurs you will be notified immediately. Additionally you would not have move from where you might be to check.

An alternative would be a battery and a lamp/LED. It's passive, you would need to check it when each connection is made, not listen.

Glenn

-----Original Message-----
From: robwwilson@...
Sent: Jun 19, 2018 4:50 PM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: [w4dccqa] Detecting shorts?

Hi - many sites recommend using a homemade short circuit detection buzzer while laying track. I’m wondering if a continuity setting on a multimeter would accomplish the same thing? In other words, if you connected a lead to each rail and you had crossed your wires, would the continuity beep on the multimeter indicating that you had a flow of current from one rail to the other? Or would that not work?
_._,_._,_


Re: Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0

Don Vollrath
 

Doug,
If only the loco hit the floor... where was the DCC decoder... In the tender?
It sounds like you verified that the loco itself runs smoothly, but was that testing done with DC (not DCC)? How did you get power to the motor?
If the jerky running only occurs with the tender connected it sounds like there is a broken wire connection or power pick-up issue in the loco or between the loco and tender. Carefully verify that no wires are broken, especially around any connectors.

I have one of those BS units as well that suddenly stopped all running. I suspect a broken wire. But how does one open the darn thing without breaking something?

DonV   

Re: Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0

Dale Gloer
 

Don/Douglas,

I have 2 BS 2-8-0s and have had both apart.  The body shell is one piece and attached by hooking over the front of the cast side frames and one screw under the drawbar (not the drawbar attachment screw) at the rear.  Just remove the screw, raise the cab end of the shell to clear the motor and slide the shell forward a bit and lift off.  I don't remember whether you need to remove the handrails at the back of the cab or not.

Hope this helps.

Dale Gloer

Re: Detecting shorts?

wirefordcc
 

One more thing about using digital voltmeters with audible continuity checking.  For some reason, some have a delay before beeping.  The delay can be several seconds before sounding.  My meter is like this.  While this isn’t the end of the world, it can be annoying.  I want to know the instant that I am about to make a shorting connection than after I’m have done the connection.

 

The meters also have some sort of visual indication that a short has been made, but the beauty of using a beeping device is that you can be wiring anywhere on your layout without having to be able to have a clear view of the meter.

 

Food for thought!

 

Allan Gartner  WiringForDCC.com 

 

Re: Detecting shorts?

Robert Wilson
 

Thank you all for the responses.  Appreciate it!

Re: Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0

Douglas Harrison <sd90mach@...>
 

Guy's thanks for your thoughts. Have had the body off and it is not a hard job to do, just be careful and has been put back on. That is when the problem surfaced. I was with a few friends last night and was discussing this problem with. One friend came up with the same thought, that a wire was pinched and was intermittently shorting on the chassis. Have not had a chance to look into this, but it is certainly worth a try.

Cheers
Douglas

Re: Bachmann Spectrum 2-8-0

Richard Gagnon
 

If not aware, there is a Bachman forum with company reps, parts pages, users, diagrams, etc, that I have followed for some years. I have Bachmann locos. 

Rich



On Wednesday, June 20, 2018, 10:16 AM, Don Vollrath <donevol43@...> wrote:

Doug,
If only the loco hit the floor... where was the DCC decoder... In the tender?
It sounds like you verified that the loco itself runs smoothly, but was that testing done with DC (not DCC)? How did you get power to the motor?
If the jerky running only occurs with the tender connected it sounds like there is a broken wire connection or power pick-up issue in the loco or between the loco and tender. Carefully verify that no wires are broken, especially around any connectors.

I have one of those BS units as well that suddenly stopped all running. I suspect a broken wire. But how does one open the darn thing without breaking something?

DonV   

How to wire a large garden extension layout

kim_atkins@...
 

Hi,
I’m Kim and I Model UK O Gauge with a friend here in Western Australia.
I’m helping to extend his o gauge 8m end to end, garage layout into the garden. He is using a NCE Radio Procab handset linked to a SB3a 5amp system with a EB1 circuit breaker and a RB02 wireless base station.
I / we need help re what size the wiring will need to be and what further NCE equipment is needed.
The 8m existing layout has an extension of 6m twin mainline which will go into a storage area inside a shed, then the twin lines go out into the garden on a 10m long raised curved section which will then connect to a twin track oval approx 50m total run round in length.
So we need to find out how to add to the NCE system to allow us to use wireless procab hand sets around the garden area, which I assume means adding at least 1 x DB5 booster and because of the distances a second wireless base station linked to it?
We intend to wire each section of track and pointwork with 24 strand dropper wire but we are not sure on the size of the main bus wire.
All trackwork will be approx 1.2m above ground level so no buried wires.

Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Regards Kim

Dead track area dcc

vincent marino
 

How do you explain a dead track area when the voltmeter reads normal? 

Re: Dead track area dcc

Mark Gurries
 

On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:51 PM, vincent marino <vmarino2009@...> wrote:

How do you explain a dead track area when the voltmeter reads normal? 
_._,_._,_


You have a open connection.

Voltmeters can lie because they do not require any current to flow of any consequence to measure the voltage.  In other words you can have a very weak electrical connection that cannot support any current and the meter will say everything is OK.

The technical reason is the voltmeter has what is called a very high input impedance.   10 millions of Ohms AKA Megohms or input resistance so to speak.

You can see an example of this if you put the meter in AC mode on the lowest voltage setting and have each one of you hands hold one of the two test leads.  Watch…you have AC voltage!  Play around with this.

You body is acting like an antenna picking up electrical energy in the air.  The meter reads this very weak signal and display a value.

In electronics, one has to know the limitation of the test equipment they use.

Regards,

Mark Gurries
Electrical Engineer
DCC Website & NMRA DCC Clinics: www.markgurries.com



Re: Dead track area dcc

Max Maginness
 

Is this in a section of plain track, part of a turnout or crossing or has rail joiners at one or both ends?

 

Seems likely you have a high resistance contact to that section – looks OK on a multimeter voltage range, but drops when any current flow is attempted.

 

Useful tool  - auto test light  – basically a 12 volt incandescent lamp in a housing with a probe at one end and a clip lead at the other.  Takes enough current to find this sort of  issue.

\

 

Max

 

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of vincent marino
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 9:51 PM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: [w4dccqa] Dead track area dcc

 

How do you explain a dead track area when the voltmeter reads normal? 

Re: Dead track area dcc

Gregory Latiak
 

It is also worth considering the nature of the electrical contact between the pickup(s) and the track in that area. If your rolling stock has a single set of pickups it might be helpful to look very closely at how the wheels track over the area where there is poor conductivity. With my own screwups, mounting a camera at track level and capturing video while the rollingstock traversed the area can sometimes be very educational. And it never hurts to ensure that both the track and the wheels are clean as any crud will magnify other problems.

greg