Date   
Re: Kato 90 degree crossing track

emrldsky
 

My experience with HO Kato and its 90 degree crossings says that just power the track as "usual" and there will be no problem - using unijoiners as designed.


Peace,

Mike G.


On 8/2/2020 6:05 PM, Kiran Kaja wrote:
Hi All,

I am exploring the possibility of having a branch line cross my double track mainline at a couple of spots on the layout. I have to use the Kato N Scale 90 degree crossing track pieces connected to each other for this. The branch line is single track. Here is a picture of what I am exploring.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1sms65rxI1sFjED4EwAkFFwM_rPNF3KaI/view?usp=sharing

I can feed power from all 6 directions but I think I will need to add feeders to the unijoiners that join the 2 actual crossing track pieces. Am I correct? Without this, I am guessing that the train on the branch line won't have power where the 2 crossing track pieces join.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Regards,
Kiran


--
Kiran kaja
Blind amateur Modeler in Northern California
N scale Unitrack | NCE | JMRI
Passenger trains only

Kato 90 degree crossing track

Kiran Kaja
 

Hi All,

I am exploring the possibility of having a branch line cross my double track mainline at a couple of spots on the layout. I have to use the Kato N Scale 90 degree crossing track pieces connected to each other for this. The branch line is single track. Here is a picture of what I am exploring.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1sms65rxI1sFjED4EwAkFFwM_rPNF3KaI/view?usp=sharing

I can feed power from all 6 directions but I think I will need to add feeders to the unijoiners that join the 2 actual crossing track pieces. Am I correct? Without this, I am guessing that the train on the branch line won't have power where the 2 crossing track pieces join.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Regards,
Kiran


--
Kiran kaja
Blind amateur Modeler in Northern California
N scale Unitrack | NCE | JMRI
Passenger trains only

Re: Converting older steam loco to dcc a scale

Gary Chudzinski
 

The Soundtraxx Tsunami2 and Eco's (if you can still find them), 2 Amp decoders are perfect for S gauge!  Of course, earlier Am. Flyer loco motors need to be converted to low Amp DC motors.  

Gary Chudzinski

Re: Converting older steam loco to dcc a scale

wirefordcc
 

Hi Rob,

I don't know that there are any decoders specifically made for S scale.  I did a quick check for you on the Soundtraxx website.  Here is a link for you and their recommendations:

https://soundtraxx.com/reference/decoder-selector

I highly recommend going with a decoder that has sound capability.  Sound brings model trains to life.  Also check out TCS's WOW! sound decoders and ESU's LokSound.  These are all popular with modelers.

You can't wrong using a decoder for O-scale.  If your motors are high efficiency, you might be able to use HO scale decoders.  The main thing is that their stall current doesn't exceed the capability of the decoder.   Put your loco on a test track using "old-fashioned" DC and briefly hold the loco so the wheels don't turn.  Measure the current it draws.  If this is within the current limit of the decoder, you can use a smaller HO locomotive.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC

Converting older steam loco to dcc a scale

robf06
 

I have a couple of older s scale locomotives that have new can motors installed and was thinking about updating to dcc. Question is decoder selection. Is there a preferred way to go in s scale? This will be my first dcc layout. Thanks for the help.

Rob Fuhst
Grand Haven,  MI

Re: MegaPoints Controllers

wirefordcc
 

Hi Lou,

I don't know if they DS-64 can store any routes.  Definitely routes go in the Digitrax Command Station.  I've used the DS-54 (predecessor to the DS-54.)  Programming wasn't too bad.

Control panels stick into the aisle and take some time to wire.  Many modelers don't have wide aisles in their homes.

Good luck!

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC

Re: MegaPoints Controllers

 

I have been very happy with the Swedish Mollehem Sevo 5.  It is very affordable, easy to set up with their Bluetooth interface and Android app, has built in relays to supply point power, sufficient inputs for local switch control as well as Loconet control.  I think it has route control but I use JMRI for that.

Re: MegaPoints Controllers

loumickie
 

Alan,

Thanks for the info I'll take a look at the LCS switch machines. I did some more research and it seems that the Digitrax DS64 and the DT400 throttle can be setup for routes; the advantage is no control panel taking up aisle space; the disadvantage would be added complexity in programming. I would be interested in hearing from anyone using the DS64s for routing via a throttle, especially in a hidden staging yard.

Regards,
Lou N
Crossville, TN

Re: MegaPoints Controllers

wirefordcc
 

Hi Lou,

A friend of mine has gotten interested in the Walther's LCS system.  I asked him for his input on it.  Here it is:

The Walthers LCS switch machines are servo motors with DCC decoders on them as well. The system is all plug-n-play with no soldering. Most of the components are sold separately with two different styles of LED push button facia controllers. I personally like the two color controller where one color is always lit. There is also available and adapter for tortoise machines to run on this system. Perhaps parts of this system might fit your needs.

-Keith

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC

MegaPoints Controllers

loumickie
 

All,

I'm in the process of building my first large HO scale railroad with Digitrax DCC. The layout features a hidden six track staging yard with a return loop at one end. I want to be able to use servo motors to control the turnouts and have them setup for automatic route control. I'll install backup cameras to monitor the tracks, and possibly some IR detectors.

I'm considering using components from the UK company MegaPoints Controllers because of the ease of route control and their well tested servo controller boards, as well as there control panels.

I'm wondering what components I could use from U.S. distributors to control the servos and incorporate route control. I realize JMRI would be one way to do it, but it would be nice to have a control panel with push buttons to do the same thing. I'm aware that TamValley offers some servo controllers, but I'm having a hard time figuring out what components would work together to accomplish what the MegaPoints system can do. Any advice would be most welcome.

Thanks,
Lou N

Re: Single Crossovers with Insulafrog Turnouts

Brian Eiland
 

[quote]The frog rails are not connected to the other frog rails, just to the other switch's curved stock rail.  [/quote]

You are correct, I made a mistake there.

But what I was looking at is even in the situation where both turnouts were thrown in their straight thru routes, the frogs of both turnouts could have two opposing track powers that could present the frog shorting problem we are trying to avoid.
It appears we DO NEED insulators in those tracks that join the two turnouts of the crossover.

Re: Single Crossovers with Insulafrog Turnouts

wirefordcc
 

I echo Don Vollrath's comment.

Let me further amplify Don's comment about adding insulated joiners at the frog end of every turnout.  As I build my new railroad, that is exactly what I am doing.  Electrically, you may not have to, but if you make a wiring mistake, problems are easily found.  You need joiners, whether they be insulated or metal, so why not avoid trouble?

Allan Gartner
Wiring For DCC

Re: insulfrog diagram on allan's website called incorrect?

Jerry Michels
 

Direction of travel is determined by the switch rails, often incorrectly called point rails because they are often referred to as "points", as one end is pointed like a blade 

This is curious.  I have called points, points for over 50 years, and never heard of points being a component of the frog. I think I will continue to call the parts of a turnout the points end and the frog end.  99% will understand exactly what I mean. 
Jerry Michels 

Re: Single Crossovers with Insulafrog Turnouts

Don Vollrath
 

One cannot go wrong to supply insulated joiners at the frog end of every turnout. This avoids any issues caused by power routing via the points You can always add electrical feed wires after the turnout. However be careful in the case of crossovers. One must maintain the proper polarity Of both sides of the mainlines in order to avoid the creation of a ‘reversing’ issue.
DonV

insulfrog diagram on allan's website called incorrect?

Brian Eiland
 

No, the diagram is incorrect.

The point rails form the frog, along with the wing rails. Today most prototype frogs are a one piece casting, so they don't really use the point and wing rails to form them.

Direction of travel is determined by the switch rails, often incorrectly called point rails because they are often referred to as "points", as one end is pointed like a blade.

There are many misleadingly labelled diagrams out there which only serve to confuse, because they take a mix and match approach to their terminology. 

Even NMRA documents mention switch rails and the frog point rails. Their diagram in NMRA Technical Note TN-12 doesn't match the one you found.

Single Crossovers with Insulafrog Turnouts

Brian Eiland
 

Single Crossovers with Insulafrog Turnouts

A question about how to correctly wire a single crossover made up of Peco Insulafrog turnouts came up over here as well, but it left me with a question.
 

I have a number of locations on my layout plan where I have the diverging routes (frog tracks/rails) mated up to one another back-to-back so to speak, ....

1) long turnouts in pairs forming a single crossover
2) long turnout paired with curved turnout forming a single crossover

I'm trying to determine my need for insulators between the pairs, in both cases,.... where they might be thrown correctly in unison,...and where they might be thrown accidentally against one another.

Re: BD 20 false positive

wirefordcc
 

Hi Russ,

 

Starting in January, I will be taking over the DCC Corner column in Model Railroader.  I will be including questions and answers.  Can I use your question?  If so, please provide your last name, city, and state.

 

Also, I’d like to hear how you make out.

 

Someone else suggested that you try a different BD20.  You can do that, but if you just want to see if your BD20 is defective, just disconnect the wire going through the red transformer.  The BD20 output should go away.

 

How many loops do you have going through your BD20?  If you have more than one, you may try less.  Also, don’t put things like Frog Juicers after the BD20.  That will cause it to false.  And Don Vollrath recommended that you don't have twisted wires after your BD20.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC

 

Re: BD 20 false positive

Don Vollrath
 

Russ, use only one pass through of the sub bus Sensing wire to that section of track. Make sure you don’t have any twisted wire after the BD20 toward the track section. Make sure there are no other electrical loads attached to the wires to that section of track. Desensitize the BD20 or replace it as others have said.
DonV

Re: BD 20 false positive

whmvd
 

Russ,

Might be handy to first make sure you're solving the actual issue. First exchange the not working detector with one that's known to work. If the problem stays with the same block, you're right - it's fiddling time. But if it moves with the detector, replace the detector.

Wouter


On Sun, 19 Jul 2020 at 21:27, Russ Wright <russwright5@...> wrote:
I have a block that shows a false positive.  The manual suggests a pot method of desensitizing.  The p/n suggested seems to be unavailable at digikey.  Can anyone provide alternative ideas or possible solutions?  Block with problem is 25 feet long with Hand laid wood ties and ballast on Homosote.
Thanks for any ideas.
Russ in Michigan



Re: BD 20 false positive

wirefordcc
 

Hi Russ,

The BD20 instructions also suggest that you can just use a resistor to desensitize the BD20.  The trick is figuring out what resistor you need.  You can do any of the following:
1.  Try different resistors.  The BD20 instructions suggest that you may need something in the 500 - 1000 ohm range.
2.  Get a pot that doesn't fit, but attach some leads to it and adjust it until you get the result you want.  Then measure the value of the pot.
3.  Get or borrow a resistor box.  Adjust it until you find a value that works and then buy the nearest resistor to whatever you dialed up on the box.

Note:  Standard resistor values seem strange.  Don't worry that you can't buy the exact value you figured you needed.  Dial your pot or resistor box to a standard value and see if that works for you.  You may have to go up or down a little.

Allan Gartner
Wiring for DCC