Date   
Re: programming CV

PennsyNut
 

Lee: being 83 is not a bad thing. I'm 80. And had been an armchair modeler for too many years. Just restarted a new layout and DCC. And that's why I wrote about how I went about it. Using online tools can help, and I worked my way through the CV's with just the manuals and YouTube. Check for online videos that show how.  I have a Zephyr and do those CV's one at a time. No fancy computer stuff - yet! And no one to come and help me. So if I can do it, so can you!
Morgan Bilbo, new to DCC

Re: programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

Got it !
And thanks again

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 12:09 PM Tom O'Hara <tomohara5@...> wrote:
 Hi...

I would strongly recommend that you search for one of the books on introductory DCC. Then study the section on how to program CVs until you are comfortable with changing one and what is accomplished when you do change one. After that, practice when one engine until you are comfortable with the process. You can always reset the engine and start over with the factory settings, but you need to know how to do the reset.... which is part of the "how to set CVs." 

It would be very handy to have someone near that you could visit or someone you could call on the phone. You could be talked through the setting CV process in a few minutes.

Then you can get into the pros and cons of setting particular CVs, which is highly engine-dependent and highly personal. This is basically play-time where you can do it with the throttle of your system, or you can get into JMRI (not essential but convenient for many folks.)

Once you are really relaxed about changing CVs, you can spend lots of time listening to and watching the results of your changes. You'll probably want to start with adjusting volumes and whistle/horn choices, but then you'll find about 12 zillion modifications you can do. Ignore these until you are comfortable with the basics. Then maybe you can try Brian's suggestions and move on to others.

...Tom

--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

Thanks, Tom
By trial and error and going over and over the CD that came with unit, I am slowly picking it up
I am 83 and slow to pick up on some of this computer world.
Got lazy with my O ga.
I promise I want call you😉😉
Lee
Regards,

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 1:45 PM Tom O'Hara <tomohara5@...> wrote:
I felt that might be the problem. So let me say again, that you need to find a human that will do it in person or get on the phone with you. I have done this more than once with EasyDCC and NCE, with which I am familiar. But a couple of times, a friend has called me about Digitrax; and I have dug into the manual on line to find out how to do it. We got him going via the phone. So see if you can find that Digitrax stranger/friend to get on the phone and let him talk you through it. Seriously,  10-15 minutes and you'll have the idea. You will then be able to start playing. 

Incidentally, please not me. I am tired of having to relearn Digitrax every year or two. Two systems are enough to keep me confused!

Happy trails!

...Tom

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 11:08 AM Lee Phillips <leenbeau@...> wrote:
Many, Many thanks for all the information. However, the DCC engine came with a CD and has  All of the CV"s listed.  I just don't know how to get into them.  I am using a Digitrax control system.  Thanks again for your help
Lee



--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Tom O'Hara
 

I felt that might be the problem. So let me say again, that you need to find a human that will do it in person or get on the phone with you. I have done this more than once with EasyDCC and NCE, with which I am familiar. But a couple of times, a friend has called me about Digitrax; and I have dug into the manual on line to find out how to do it. We got him going via the phone. So see if you can find that Digitrax stranger/friend to get on the phone and let him talk you through it. Seriously,  10-15 minutes and you'll have the idea. You will then be able to start playing. 

Incidentally, please not me. I am tired of having to relearn Digitrax every year or two. Two systems are enough to keep me confused!

Happy trails!

...Tom

On Sat, May 18, 2019 at 11:08 AM Lee Phillips <leenbeau@...> wrote:
Many, Many thanks for all the information. However, the DCC engine came with a CD and has  All of the CV"s listed.  I just don't know how to get into them.  I am using a Digitrax control system.  Thanks again for your help
Lee



--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Tom O'Hara
 

 Hi...

I would strongly recommend that you search for one of the books on introductory DCC. Then study the section on how to program CVs until you are comfortable with changing one and what is accomplished when you do change one. After that, practice when one engine until you are comfortable with the process. You can always reset the engine and start over with the factory settings, but you need to know how to do the reset.... which is part of the "how to set CVs." 

It would be very handy to have someone near that you could visit or someone you could call on the phone. You could be talked through the setting CV process in a few minutes.

Then you can get into the pros and cons of setting particular CVs, which is highly engine-dependent and highly personal. This is basically play-time where you can do it with the throttle of your system, or you can get into JMRI (not essential but convenient for many folks.)

Once you are really relaxed about changing CVs, you can spend lots of time listening to and watching the results of your changes. You'll probably want to start with adjusting volumes and whistle/horn choices, but then you'll find about 12 zillion modifications you can do. Ignore these until you are comfortable with the basics. Then maybe you can try Brian's suggestions and move on to others.

...Tom

--
... Tom

Re: programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

Many, Many thanks for all the information. However, the DCC engine came with a CD and has  All of the CV"s listed.  I just don't know how to get into them.  I am using a Digitrax control system.  Thanks again for your help
Lee

Re: programming CV

PennsyNut
 

I concur with all. But need to add. The first thing I did when starting with a new loco fresh from the mfgr, imptr. On a programming track, using either Page or Direct, reset the loco number from 3 to whatever you want, usually the loco number. That's about 99%. Then, while on programming track, read the CV's for those basic ones, CV 3,4,5&6. "Write them down". What I tried doing at first, was to go ahead an change some. But found it better to just leave the loco number on and take the engine to the running track. Using Ops mode, change one number at a time. Example was CV 5. When satisfied you have the right number in CV 5, "Write it down". Then do CV 6. Same, when satisfied, WRITE IT DOWN. Continue on with CV 3 & 4. When done with these 4 (CV 5, 6, 3, 4). Leave the engine alone. Play with it. Run it until you are totally satisfied. Those numbers written down, the original and your choices. They are you bible. Retain in someplace secure. I use a binder for the paper and also an excel file on the PC. All back up. The other CV's can wait until you are more comfortable with them. IMHO, that's as far as I went. Even with my sound loco. My next step with the sound loco is the bell and whistle. Those require the locos manual to get the right CV's. Again though, before changing any others, go back to the programming track and read the original settings for each CV you are interested in. Be sure to record/write/input on PC. I can not emphasize this enough! Now this should help everyone. And if you disagree, please do so.
Morgan Bilbo, still learning, but getting better at DCC

Re: programming CV

John Johnston
 

Brian,

Kudos for writing this so clearly.  I have been learning about CVs by trial and error (mostly error), and most of what I have read on the subject is pitched above my head.  Your note is a great guide for beginners like me.  I am saving it for future reference.

Thanks

From: w4dccqa@groups.io <w4dccqa@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Lewis
Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2019 6:11 AM
To: w4dccqa@groups.io
Subject: Re: [w4dccqa] programming CV

 

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:

What are CV's and how do I program them ?

--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

vincent marino
 

I concur with Bryan educate yourself on JMRI and all your CV issues and even ones you didn't know you had (consist) will be resolved. 


On Sat, May 18, 2019, 9:37 AM Brian Lewis <brian@...> wrote:

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:
What are CV's and how do I program them ?
--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

Tom G.
 

Brian,

Thank you. Very informative. Good info to save. 

Thanks.
Tom

On May 18, 2019, at 6:11 AM, Brian Lewis <brian@...> wrote:

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:
What are CV's and how do I program them ?
--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

Re: programming CV

Richard_vanRaay
 

aThanks for taking the time to write such a detailed response. I learnt a lot.
Cheers.
Richrd.

Re: programming CV

Brian Lewis
 

Oh Gosh! This is going to stir up a can of worms.

If you do not know what you are doing, then leave the decoder at the manufacturer's default settings - it should run well at these settings. But you will probably find that the acceleration/deceleration and the top and mid speeds are not what you want.  So proceed cautiously as follows, noting every default and changed setting, as you go. Be sure you know the CV number and value that returns the decoder to its default setting. It is your layout, so do what you want, but this is how I begin.

First I look at the top speed - CV5. It is probably set at 0 or 255 and for me, is too fast. I have 30+ locos and on these no CV5 is set above 120.

Then adjust CV6 - the mid speed. I normally set it at around 40% of the value of CV5, e.g. if CV5 is 120, then CV6 will be set to 50.

Then consider acceleration/deceleration. Generally speaking, you want the loco to slow down slightly quicker than it accelerates. As my layout is essentially a 26 foot shunting plank, I use 3 for acceleration - CV3 and 1 for deceleration - CV4.

How does the loco start on control setting 4? (You are using 126 speed steps aren't you, rather than 28)? At this setting the loco should move away prototypically. If not, set CV2 to 40, test it and then adjust up or down until you are happy.

Really until you have gained some knowledge you should leave everything else alone.  But in truth I do adjust other CVs, as follows, basically because most of my locos are old and are not equipped with modern motors.

CV9 adjusts the EMF sampling rate. I start at a setting of 88.

CV56 adjusts the PID control. I set this at 99.

CV57 deals with track voltage. I set this at 140.

CV58 can improve mid speed performance, I set this at 200.

CV65 adjusts the 'kick' rate at startup. I set this to 25.

CV116 sets the kick rate. I set this to 2.

CV117 sets the kick strength. I set this to 25.

CV123 helps prevent jerky starts. I set this to 24.

Now I stress yet again, these settings work for me. I am as equally sure there will be folk out there who will be horrified at this. So, as 'tit for tat' emails, (which this elist does specialise in occasionally), bore me, this is my one time comment and I will leave others to add as they please.

My final piece of advice is to search the Internet for JMRI and Decoder Pro. I do all my adjustments via a computer, which not only makes adjustment, but also stores your settings.

Have fun.

On 18/05/2019 00:11, leenbeau@... wrote:
What are CV's and how do I program them ?
--

Regards and thanks

 

Brian Lewis

programming CV

Lee Phillips
 

What are CV's and how do I program them ?

Re: Not planning on a Reversing Triangle on my next Layout.

Mark Cartwright
 

Thank you for both of your replies...
Now combine them....
I have a very long reply which is in the Drafts...
To save you all the tedious time of reading it...
Here is the Gist:

You need to get the whole locomotive through the Switch Turnout BEFORE It encounters yet another aspect of Connectivity...or even physics.

So the front pilot can not derail through the turnout and the drivers should remain rigid as one or it confused at the frog.
Further...The tender wheels need to clear the turnout before the pilot wheels encounter the next conductivity.
How do you do that in a WYE ?
Good Luck with that...!
Cause for now...No WYE's 
Only Three #12 Turnouts.
Once I can circumnavigate my House and 25x30 foot layout....
Will I pick up the Gambit of Auto-Reversers ?
Not until I install LokSound Decoders with Sound into several of my Steam Locomotives.
Each of those will require 12 or so hours of labor and concentration.
======
Got Oak Tress and Rolling Hills ?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZocpwWLsyE

It's all about the money Boys !
After purchasing several defunct layouts which never came to be....
I began to create my own Oak Trees and Rolling Hills which depict California.
NOT Mississippi.
Thank you for the conversational hiatus.
I refuse to be a Man of Constant Sorrow.
:)) Mark

It's not really about the money nor the constant collecting of this stuff (which may nor may not work).
It's about completing an Operational Layout with Trees in your life time.
I am feeling a bit guilty for buying so much of this stuff from Widows; as another of my few friends from High School may not survive the week.

Digitrax PR4 Interface DCC

James Ford
 

Does anyone know if the Digitrax PR4 Interface will program an engine that is equipped with a keep alive device? My club is replacing a DCC Specialties interface because our experience is it will not program an engine with keep alive.  The SoundTraxx PTB-100 will as a member has one, but we have a chance to get the PR4 as a donation. 
Thanks,
Jim Ford
Elkhart Model Railroad Club
www.emrrc.com 

Re: Not planning on a Reversing Triangle on my next Layout.

Carl
 

Hi Gang:

On Jim's layout we have DPDT push - push buttons and Red / Green LEDs at the ends of the reversing blocks. If the polarity is wrong, the LED is Red and you push the DPDT button and the LED goes Green. We also have AR units in the circuit, but I find it easier not to depend on them alone.

Carl.



Virus-free. www.avast.com

Re: Not planning on a Reversing Triangle on my next Layout.

Don Vollrath
 

Typical reasons an auto-reverser does not work or stops working is that there is that
a) One of the gaps closes due to rail movement;
b) There is a poor electrical connection to rails on one or both sides of the gaps so that a 'good' short circuit current pulse is not created, as is needed to cause the AR unit to trip. The AR unit needs to be fed directly from the main DCC distribution bus, not from rail attachments adjacent to the gaps.;
c) The AR unit needs a larger pulse of current to trigger than can be delivered by the booster;
d) The AR section and mainline tracks are powered from different booster districts [requires a good booster common connection]
e) The AR unit is powered from the load side of an electronic circuit breaker that trips first [re-read b) ]
f) One attempts to use a Frog-Juicer or inferior AR unit that does not flip the polarity of both rails when only one side sees the current pulse.
g) There is a poor electrical connection of pickup bonding wires between loco wheels that limits the magnitude of short circuit current pulse need to trip the AR unit. The booster may trip first on a timed overload. [similar to b) and c) ]

DonV

Not planning on a Reversing Triangle on my next Layout.

Mark Cartwright
 

Scroll down to the Application 2 Example.
https://dccwiki.com/Reverse_Sections

I installed such a Wye with an Auto Reverser on my last modular layout with sections of Kato Unitrack, so it was easily segmented with appropriate (or so I thought) insulated gaps.
The purpose of the WYE was not to simply turn around but to travel down a slope to a Round Table and Roundhouse.
Then upon a locomotives exit could travel in either direction to the main lines of my layout.
In keeping with our Jeopardy Theme here of asking question for answers...
WYE did it work ...and then Didn't ?
====
It worked for my many diesels but for nearly none of my steam locomotives.
:)) Mark

Re: Purpose of this Q&A Forum

wirefordcc
 

I try to give some latitude in the discussions.  Sometimes we have a lot of good dialogue on ways to approach a problem which may have multiple solutions.

 

Each person should ask themselves, does a response pertain to DCC?  Ideally, it should pertain to the initial question asked, but as long as it pertains to DCC, that is okay.

 

When responses get off “in the weeds”, people start quitting the Q&A Forum. 

 

When responses have nothing to do with DCC, they should be taken to other chat groups or Facebook.

 

Thank you

 

Allan Gartner  WiringForDCC.com 

        

 

Re: Purpose of this Q&A Forum

Jerry Michels
 

Allan,  Can you give a bit more direction here?  Are we to only ask and answer, but carry on no social interactions?  Of course I have not seen what you terminated, but am curious to get the gist so I keep my posts in line

Jerry Michels

--
Socialism is slavery!