Topics

Is it safe to move a turlte nest?


Mary Thomas
 

Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein


Matt Burne
 

Generally speaking it's probably ok to do with painted and snappers if they've put a nest somewhere that is susceptible to destruction. If it's a private drive, is it located such that cones or some other marker could be put up to help avoid until hatching? It's better to leave them if possible.

Note that if this were a listed turtle, it would be illegal to move them without permission by NHESP.

Matt

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 10:21 AM Mary Thomas <wzzw19@...> wrote:
Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein




--
Matt Burne
Senior Ecologist, BSC Group, Inc.
Vice-President, Vernal Pool Association


C Mark Blatchley
 

A significant number of turtle next get raided by raccoons and other predators. Depending on location and evidence of burial it may not be much of a loss if moving and reburial in a similar location (remember sun exposure).


On 6/21/20 11:30 AM, Matt Burne wrote:
Generally speaking it's probably ok to do with painted and snappers if they've put a nest somewhere that is susceptible to destruction. If it's a private drive, is it located such that cones or some other marker could be put up to help avoid until hatching? It's better to leave them if possible.

Note that if this were a listed turtle, it would be illegal to move them without permission by NHESP.

Matt

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 10:21 AM Mary Thomas <wzzw19@...> wrote:
Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein




--
Matt Burne
Senior Ecologist, BSC Group, Inc.
Vice-President, Vernal Pool Association


Mary Thomas
 

Thanks, Matt and C. Mark! I've passed the info you provided along to
the homeowner. They saw the painted turtle laying her eggs and they're
both pretty nature savvy, so it's not a listed species.

On 6/21/20, C Mark Blatchley <chmarbla@...> wrote:
A significant number of turtle next get raided by raccoons and other
predators. Depending on location and evidence of burial it may not be
much of a loss if moving and reburial in a similar location (remember
sun exposure).


On 6/21/20 11:30 AM, Matt Burne wrote:
Generally speaking it's probably ok to do with painted and snappers if
they've put a nest somewhere that is susceptible to destruction. If
it's a private drive, is it located such that cones or some other
marker could be put up to help avoid until hatching? It's better to
leave them if possible.

Note that if this were a listed turtle, it would be illegal to move
them without permission by NHESP.

Matt

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 10:21 AM Mary Thomas <wzzw19@...
<mailto:wzzw19@...>> wrote:

Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the
herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein




--
Matt Burne
/Senior Ecologist, /BSC Group, Inc.
/Vice-President, /Vernal Pool Association


--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein


Scott Shumway
 

When relocating turtle eggs, is it important to maintain the same orientation and relative positioning of the eggs?  I seem to recall being told by my herp friends that orientation is important for development and changing the orientation messes up how development proceeds.  Can more knowledgeable folks help clarify?

On 6/21/20 2:48 PM, Mary Thomas wrote:
Thanks, Matt and C. Mark! I've passed the info you provided along to
the homeowner. They saw the painted turtle laying her eggs and they're
both pretty nature savvy, so it's not a listed species.

On 6/21/20, C Mark Blatchley <chmarbla@...> wrote:
A significant number of turtle next get raided by raccoons and other
predators. Depending on location and evidence of burial it may not be
much of a loss if moving and reburial in a similar location (remember
sun exposure).


On 6/21/20 11:30 AM, Matt Burne wrote:
Generally speaking it's probably ok to do with painted and snappers if
they've put a nest somewhere that is susceptible to destruction. If
it's a private drive, is it located such that cones or some other
marker could be put up to help avoid until hatching? It's better to
leave them if possible.

Note that if this were a listed turtle, it would be illegal to move
them without permission by NHESP.

Matt

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 10:21 AM Mary Thomas <wzzw19@...
<mailto:wzzw19@...>> wrote:

Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the
herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein




--
Matt Burne
/Senior Ecologist, /BSC Group, Inc.
/Vice-President, /Vernal Pool Association

--
Scott Shumway
Professor of Biology
Wheaton College
Norton, MA 02766
http://www.wheatoncollege.edu/Faculty/ScottWShumway.html
sshumway@...


Thomas Hodgson
 

Yes the orientation of the embryo in the egg is usually established soon after the eggs are laid. At this time a noticeably whiter spot develops on the top side of each egg. When relocating a clutch, each egg should be oriented with the white spot facing up.

On Jun 21, 2020, at 6:26 PM, Scott Shumway <shumway_scott@...> wrote:

When relocating turtle eggs, is it important to maintain the same orientation and relative positioning of the eggs? I seem to recall being told by my herp friends that orientation is important for development and changing the orientation messes up how development proceeds. Can more knowledgeable folks help clarify?

On 6/21/20 2:48 PM, Mary Thomas wrote:
Thanks, Matt and C. Mark! I've passed the info you provided along to
the homeowner. They saw the painted turtle laying her eggs and they're
both pretty nature savvy, so it's not a listed species.

On 6/21/20, C Mark Blatchley <chmarbla@...> wrote:
A significant number of turtle next get raided by raccoons and other
predators. Depending on location and evidence of burial it may not be
much of a loss if moving and reburial in a similar location (remember
sun exposure).


On 6/21/20 11:30 AM, Matt Burne wrote:
Generally speaking it's probably ok to do with painted and snappers if
they've put a nest somewhere that is susceptible to destruction. If
it's a private drive, is it located such that cones or some other
marker could be put up to help avoid until hatching? It's better to
leave them if possible.

Note that if this were a listed turtle, it would be illegal to move
them without permission by NHESP.

Matt

On Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 10:21 AM Mary Thomas <wzzw19@...
<mailto:wzzw19@...>> wrote:

Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the
herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein




--
Matt Burne
/Senior Ecologist, /BSC Group, Inc.
/Vice-President, /Vernal Pool Association

--
Scott Shumway
Professor of Biology
Wheaton College
Norton, MA 02766
http://www.wheatoncollege.edu/Faculty/ScottWShumway.html
sshumway@...




Carolyn Decker
 

It could be ok to relocate to a nearby spot with identical conditions. The sooner the better, though! I am not a painted turtle expert but I know in other turtles that, after a day or two, the developing embryo attaches to the inner membrane of the egg. 

This means that the orientation of the egg in the nest is very important. Turning the egg can suffocate the developing embryo. Matching the soil conditions, size, shape, and depth of the nest is very important too. 

If at all possible, protecting the nest in place would better ensure that the eggs successfully develop. 

-Carolyn
Ecology grad student at URI


On Sun, Jun 21, 2020, 10:21 Mary Thomas <wzzw19@...> wrote:
Hi everyone.

This isn't really vernal-pool related, but this list is where the herp
experts are so I'm seeking advice. A painted turtle has laid her eggs
in someone's sandy driveway and I've been asked if it's safe to dig a
new nest at the same depth in a safer location and put the eggs in
there.

Mary in Wendell

--
"No problem can be solved from the same level of consciousness that
created it." Albert Einstein