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Show and tell. an electric carriage clock slave.


James Kelly
 


If any member wishes to post images of about particular clock they own, and give us a little bit of its history or ask a question about anything they are unsure of regarding their clock then I hope they will share with it us.

I have a small electric carriage clock of the slave type clock which I purchased some years ago , I have it running here at home using a modern slave clock impulse unit, many years ago on the old yahoo site I asked about this early clock, it was suggested that that it was possibly made by Milde of France, it is most unusual in that it has a an illuminated dial and is beautifully made, it possible dates from 1860's.

I've attached some images which I hope may stimulate your interest.

I welcome any thoughts or comments the members may have. 

Regards

Jim


John Haine
 

James, that's a very interesting clock!  Which master/slave system would it have been a part of in 1860?  How is the dial illuminated?  I don't think incandescent lamps were in production before the 1880s, according to Wikipedia?


James Kelly
 

Hi John

Of course you are right with the dating which means this clock would have been produced a lot later than the date I proposed, the dial is made of white glass with the numerals painted on it, if you look at the side on image of the clock  you can see there is a gap between the movement and dial were there is a reflective concave disc, also there are two small flat lamps mounted on posts in between the dial and the disc which illuminate the dial when voltage of 9 volts is applied. 

It is really a very interesting clock, its difficult to suggest a maker and in regards to master clock to drive it does work  when connected in series with other slave clocks, I think though that it was purely for domestic use, perhaps as a bedside clock with  a press attached, it would of course require 4 wires to be taken to the clock. There are slave clocks made by Bain, Campiche, Hipp, Milde, Garnier.  Milde has been suggested as the way the clock advances by pulling rather than pushing  is found in to clocks by him.

Attached so more images and an Image of a Milde clock capable of driving this slave and also another slave made by Milde.

Thanks for your input I do appreciate it

Regards

Jim
 


John Haine
 

It looks more and more interesting!  Those flat bulbs are very unusual - I guess they are no longer available?!  Could the illumination be a later addition?  Is it very noisy when impulsed?  When I demo'd a 'Nome slave dial to my wife it was instantly vetoed from the house because of the clock!  So I had to modify the dial to use a stepper instead.  I guess this might have been a "desk clock" for the mantlepiece in a board room or suchlike in an organisation where there was already a master/slave clock system for other spaces?

There's an industrial museum, in Manchester if I recall correctly, that is built around an old water-powered textile mill.  It has at least one clock on the end of one of the line shafts driving the machinery, so the shifts got longer when there was less water power, to keep the production going.  Sneaky I thought...

John.


John Hubert
 

There were a number of optional ‘quiet’ designs for 30 second single polarity systems by both Synchronome and Gents - as well as the Silent Electric slaves.  Some earlier G&J versions were also rather quieter.  None are all that common.

On 11 Dec 2020, at 16:50, John Haine <john.haine@...> wrote:

It looks more and more interesting!  Those flat bulbs are very unusual - I guess they are no longer available?!  Could the illumination be a later addition?  Is it very noisy when impulsed?  When I demo'd a 'Nome slave dial to my wife it was instantly vetoed from the house because of the clock!  So I had to modify the dial to use a stepper instead.  I guess this might have been a "desk clock" for the mantlepiece in a board room or suchlike in an organisation where there was already a master/slave clock system for other spaces?

There's an industrial museum, in Manchester if I recall correctly, that is built around an old water-powered textile mill.  It has at least one clock on the end of one of the line shafts driving the machinery, so the shifts got longer when there was less water power, to keep the production going.  Sneaky I thought...

John.


James Kelly
 

Hi John + John 


The clock has a quite audible click and is situated amongst others in the lounge, like all clock noise you get used to it after awhile and don't notice it, but I don't the wife  would allow it it the bedroom. I think the lit dial is contemporaneous to the clock and the layout of the movement is similar to Milde clocks dating from 1871 see attached diagrams, references to very early bulbs do exist before that date but I cant find any images of such lamps, so tend to think its a later made clock but I have no idea when Milde ceased production and have drawn a blank there. There would be not point in illuminating the dial if it wasn't for use in a darkened room, so bedroom or sick room seem to be the obvious conclusion.

Its certainly a talking point anyway.

Thanks

Jim



On Friday, 11 December 2020, 17:24:08 GMT, John Hubert <jfphubert@...> wrote:


There were a number of optional ‘quiet’ designs for 30 second single polarity systems by both Synchronome and Gents - as well as the Silent Electric slaves.  Some earlier G&J versions were also rather quieter.  None are all that common.

On 11 Dec 2020, at 16:50, John Haine <john.haine@...> wrote:

It looks more and more interesting!  Those flat bulbs are very unusual - I guess they are no longer available?!  Could the illumination be a later addition?  Is it very noisy when impulsed?  When I demo'd a 'Nome slave dial to my wife it was instantly vetoed from the house because of the clock!  So I had to modify the dial to use a stepper instead.  I guess this might have been a "desk clock" for the mantlepiece in a board room or suchlike in an organisation where there was already a master/slave clock system for other spaces?

There's an industrial museum, in Manchester if I recall correctly, that is built around an old water-powered textile mill.  It has at least one clock on the end of one of the line shafts driving the machinery, so the shifts got longer when there was less water power, to keep the production going.  Sneaky I thought...

John.


bailey.services@...
 

I wonder what the level of illumination would have been in a house of the period? Even a property such as Cragside with electric lighting from around the 1880's would be dimly lit compared to modern standards.
Howard


James Kelly
 

Hi Howard

That’s an interesting point, I haven’t taken an image of the clock at night with the illuminated that’s on my list of things to be done. 

Jim


On 12 Dec 2020, at 07:06, bailey.services via groups.io <bailey.services@...> wrote:

I wonder what the level of illumination would have been in a house of the period? Even a property such as Cragside with electric lighting from around the 1880's would be dimly lit compared to modern standards.
Howard


John Hubert
 

A bit ‘off topic’, but there are three very good books on ‘Country House Technology’ and lighting;
  • Technology in the Country House by Marylin Palmer & Ian West
  • Country House Technology by P.S. Barnwell & Marilyn Palmer
  • Artificial Sunshine by Maureen Dillon

On 12 Dec 2020, at 07:05, bailey.services via groups.io <bailey.services@...> wrote:

I wonder what the level of illumination would have been in a house of the period? Even a property such as Cragside with electric lighting from around the 1880's would be dimly lit compared to modern standards.
Howard


taf@...
 

Darkened room?  Need to keep track of time?  Loud clicking not considered a problem?

Brothel clock?

Inquiring minds...

T




On Dec 11, 2020, at 13:42, James Kelly via groups.io <jimfortress@...> wrote:


Hi John + John 


The clock has a quite audible click and is situated amongst others in the lounge, like all clock noise you get used to it after awhile and don't notice it, but I don't the wife  would allow it it the bedroom. I think the lit dial is contemporaneous to the clock and the layout of the movement is similar to Milde clocks dating from 1871 see attached diagrams, references to very early bulbs do exist before that date but I cant find any images of such lamps, so tend to think its a later made clock but I have no idea when Milde ceased production and have drawn a blank there. There would be not point in illuminating the dial if it wasn't for use in a darkened room, so bedroom or sick room seem to be the obvious conclusion.

Its certainly a talking point anyway.

Thanks

Jim



On Friday, 11 December 2020, 17:24:08 GMT, John Hubert <jfphubert@...> wrote:


There were a number of optional ‘quiet’ designs for 30 second single polarity systems by both Synchronome and Gents - as well as the Silent Electric slaves.  Some earlier G&J versions were also rather quieter.  None are all that common.

On 11 Dec 2020, at 16:50, John Haine <john.haine@...> wrote:

It looks more and more interesting!  Those flat bulbs are very unusual - I guess they are no longer available?!  Could the illumination be a later addition?  Is it very noisy when impulsed?  When I demo'd a 'Nome slave dial to my wife it was instantly vetoed from the house because of the clock!  So I had to modify the dial to use a stepper instead.  I guess this might have been a "desk clock" for the mantlepiece in a board room or suchlike in an organisation where there was already a master/slave clock system for other spaces?

There's an industrial museum, in Manchester if I recall correctly, that is built around an old water-powered textile mill.  It has at least one clock on the end of one of the line shafts driving the machinery, so the shifts got longer when there was less water power, to keep the production going.  Sneaky I thought...

John.

<Milde Diagram 1.JPG>
<Milde Diagram 2.JPG>


bailey.services@...
 

Maureen Dillon book was an excellent Christmas read. Up until the 1920's electricity in the U.K. Was supplied by 100's of Companies or privately generated, either AC or DC, varying voltages. Houses were partially electrified, levels of illumination were only equivalent to gas lighting. Swan Edison bulbs at 16 candle power (25 watts) would only partially illuminate a room. Systems were unreliable, lights wired in series so if one blew they all went out. As more lights were illuminated so current dropped and lights dimmed. Apologies for errors in précis written without checking.

Adds to the fun of watching period dramas on tv when you can criticise levels of lighting, too many candles, chandelier at the wrong height etc etc!


John Haine
 

Mind you, the maids could probably get away with less thorough dusting...