putting clocks on forwards or backwards


Geoff
 

I used to have to visit master and slave clock sites and step on or stop for an hour, clock systems. Putting back was easy, just stop them for an hour. However, stepping on an hour was not so easy. With synchronome, the pendulum starts banging the case when you set it to pulse continually. You have to stop then and on some clock systems, you had to manually step the clock on by hand. If you slightly jerked or made an irregular pulse, there would be some clocks out of step! Then you would have to get big ladders to adjust the wrong clocks! Out of interest, what do people do now with lots of quartz clocks around? I presume they have to visit EVERY clock??........The old system was easier wasn't it?


RICHARD ADAMEK
 

As a practical suggestion, only the Gents runs permanently so when setting it on I have a couple of bits of foam which normally lay on the floor, I stand one either side of the pendulum bob so as the swing increases they damp any excess out nicely.

It was removed from the local Tech and replaced by quarts clocks, between battery failures, cost, vandalism and theft they collected the whole lot in again and issued only for exams, staff & students own watches catering for all other timekeeping purposes, I suspect many other places did the same.

Best regs

Richard


On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 21:47:43 GMT, Geoff via Groups.Io <urjoking_uk@...> wrote:


I used to have to visit master and slave clock sites and step on or stop for an hour, clock systems. Putting back was easy, just stop them for an hour. However, stepping on an hour was not so easy. With synchronome, the pendulum starts banging the case when you set it to pulse continually. You have to stop then and on some clock systems, you had to manually step the clock on by hand. If you slightly jerked or made an irregular pulse, there would be some clocks out of step! Then you would have to get big ladders to adjust the wrong clocks! Out of interest, what do people do now with lots of quartz clocks around? I presume they have to visit EVERY clock??........The old system was easier wasn't it?


Ian Richardson
 

On the subject of advancing clocks, I also adopt the approach suggested by Richard, but with a piece of soft rag only at the left hand side of the case which I find absorbs the impact of the pendulum more calmly.

For Synchronome, I never use the installed system of pushing the gathering arm up into the path of the release catch - far too dodgy!!  I have developed a piece of bent wire which is difficult to describe, but it sits on the catch arbor and has a short piece which engages the catch below.  The vertical long end is arranged to be pushed aside (to the left) by the pendulum.  As the pendulum swings left, the catch is thus released, dropping the gravity arm on to the flat land of the impulse pallet.  The pendulum swings to the right, and the gravity arm resets as normal and the whole cycle repeats with each swing of the pendulum.  The extra friction brought about by the gravity arm roller running on the flat land of the impulse pallet prevents the arc becoming excessive.  The wire thingy is simply lifted off when the hour has been added - or nearly so, the last impulse or two being initiated manually to bring the clocks to time.

If I get round to it, I'll try to photograph this system in use.

Ian R
Macclesfield, UK


-----Original Message-----
From: RICHARD ADAMEK via Groups.Io <oldenginehouse@...>
To: synchronome1 <synchronome1@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jan 10, 2019 11:32 pm
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] putting clocks on forwards or backwards

As a practical suggestion, only the Gents runs permanently so when setting it on I have a couple of bits of foam which normally lay on the floor, I stand one either side of the pendulum bob so as the swing increases they damp any excess out nicely.

It was removed from the local Tech and replaced by quarts clocks, between battery failures, cost, vandalism and theft they collected the whole lot in again and issued only for exams, staff & students own watches catering for all other timekeeping purposes, I suspect many other places did the same.

Best regs

Richard


On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 21:47:43 GMT, Geoff via Groups.Io <urjoking_uk@...> wrote:


I used to have to visit master and slave clock sites and step on or stop for an hour, clock systems. Putting back was easy, just stop them for an hour. However, stepping on an hour was not so easy. With synchronome, the pendulum starts banging the case when you set it to pulse continually. You have to stop then and on some clock systems, you had to manually step the clock on by hand. If you slightly jerked or made an irregular pulse, there would be some clocks out of step! Then you would have to get big ladders to adjust the wrong clocks! Out of interest, what do people do now with lots of quartz clocks around? I presume they have to visit EVERY clock??........The old system was easier wasn't it?


Stuart Baskill
 

When I worked for Gents and had to advance a clock system after a repair etc,I used to put the instructions book that was kept in the case down the side.This dampened out the increased swing and stopped the pendulum smashing into the case.I tied the string down.If it was an old system, or it only needed advancing a small amount,I pulled the string only on alternative swings which gave the slave movements twice as long to operate and stopped them missing pulses if they stuck a bit.It was better than adjusting 500 slave clocks individually!!  If they were hopelessly different times I used to find the most inaccessible clock and advance that to correct time and then alter the others by hand.Gent stopped bothering with clocks around 1990 when they concentrated on fire alarm systems.

On ‎Thursday‎, ‎10‎ ‎January‎ ‎2019‎ ‎22‎:‎32‎:‎16‎ ‎GMT, RICHARD ADAMEK via Groups.Io <oldenginehouse@...> wrote:


As a practical suggestion, only the Gents runs permanently so when setting it on I have a couple of bits of foam which normally lay on the floor, I stand one either side of the pendulum bob so as the swing increases they damp any excess out nicely.

It was removed from the local Tech and replaced by quarts clocks, between battery failures, cost, vandalism and theft they collected the whole lot in again and issued only for exams, staff & students own watches catering for all other timekeeping purposes, I suspect many other places did the same.

Best regs

Richard


On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 21:47:43 GMT, Geoff via Groups.Io <urjoking_uk@...> wrote:


I used to have to visit master and slave clock sites and step on or stop for an hour, clock systems. Putting back was easy, just stop them for an hour. However, stepping on an hour was not so easy. With synchronome, the pendulum starts banging the case when you set it to pulse continually. You have to stop then and on some clock systems, you had to manually step the clock on by hand. If you slightly jerked or made an irregular pulse, there would be some clocks out of step! Then you would have to get big ladders to adjust the wrong clocks! Out of interest, what do people do now with lots of quartz clocks around? I presume they have to visit EVERY clock??........The old system was easier wasn't it?


John Haine
 

At the University that I visit regularly, they have put radio controlled quartz clocks everywhere in an attempt to solve this.  However they don't necessarily work very well in the reinforced concrete buildings so they are frequently showing the wrong time or stopped.