Topics

Pulsynetic 1301


Ernie Jenson
 

Is this the group that I should address questions to regarding a Gent Pulsynetic?  We don't have many in California, but I do find much information on the internet. If this is the proper group then perhaps someone could help me with information. Should mine have had a scale at the bottom to monitor the degrees of swing of the pendulum?  I do not see any holes in the case where one would have been mounted.  There is just a small part of a label remaining on the top left corner of the case.  I was wondering what it would have stated.  There is a number stamped at the top of the case, 1301  If that is the serial number, then the clock would be over 100 years old.  I have my suspicion on that mater as the little coil that is for spark suppression looks to be enamel coated.  I though enamel coating didn't appear in clocks until the late twenties. The clock coils are fabric covered and look like they could be this old.

Many years ago I acquired a Hipp Clock with a Prolonged Impulse from England.  That is a project clock that was a monthly subject in an English publication, Model Engineer, and also in Hope-Jone's book, Electric Clocks and How to Make Them.  The clock may have never been finished as it did not have a clock works or any contact to send a pulse to a secondary clock.  I obtain a part from a Synchronome from a fellow in New Zealand.  That is how I learned about a Synchronome and Hope-Davis and so I have always wanted a Synchronome since then. The best I could come up with is the Pulsynetic. I now have it in great condition and it runs without trouble.  The Hipp clock was much harder to make run.     


neil
 

Hello Ernie,
                   It is the 'sychronome' group but an electric clock is an electric clock.
 I have several C7 clocks also, and have attached a photo of the ser number and the pendulum amplitude plate, which is attached with 4 small nails.
Neil Jepsen.
On 16/04/19 11:40 AM, Ernie Jenson via Groups.Io wrote:

Is this the group that I should address questions to regarding a Gent Pulsynetic?  We don't have many in California, but I do find much information on the internet. If this is the proper group then perhaps someone could help me with information. Should mine have had a scale at the bottom to monitor the degrees of swing of the pendulum?  I do not see any holes in the case where one would have been mounted.  There is just a small part of a label remaining on the top left corner of the case.  I was wondering what it would have stated.  There is a number stamped at the top of the case, 1301  If that is the serial number, then the clock would be over 100 years old.  I have my suspicion on that mater as the little coil that is for spark suppression looks to be enamel coated.  I though enamel coating didn't appear in clocks until the late twenties. The clock coils are fabric covered and look like they could be this old.

Many years ago I acquired a Hipp Clock with a Prolonged Impulse from England.  That is a project clock that was a monthly subject in an English publication, Model Engineer, and also in Hope-Jone's book, Electric Clocks and How to Make Them.  The clock may have never been finished as it did not have a clock works or any contact to send a pulse to a secondary clock.  I obtain a part from a Synchronome from a fellow in New Zealand.  That is how I learned about a Synchronome and Hope-Davis and so I have always wanted a Synchronome since then. The best I could come up with is the Pulsynetic. I now have it in great condition and it runs without trouble.  The Hipp clock was much harder to make run.     


John Howell
 

Hello Ernie,

If your Gents C7 really is numbered 1301 it is one of the earliest known and would have been dated around 1913. Could you post a photo or two?

There is wide knowledge and information about Gents and their clocks on the electric-clocks group why not join?

Put this in your browser & have a look:

electric-clocks@groups.io

Best wishes,

John Howell.



On 16/04/2019 00:40, Ernie Jenson via Groups.Io wrote:
Is this the group that I should address questions to regarding a Gent Pulsynetic?  We don't have many in California, but I do find much information on the internet. If this is the proper group then perhaps someone could help me with information. Should mine have had a scale at the bottom to monitor the degrees of swing of the pendulum?  I do not see any holes in the case where one would have been mounted.  There is just a small part of a label remaining on the top left corner of the case.  I was wondering what it would have stated.  There is a number stamped at the top of the case, 1301  If that is the serial number, then the clock would be over 100 years old.  I have my suspicion on that mater as the little coil that is for spark suppression looks to be enamel coated.  I though enamel coating didn't appear in clocks until the late twenties. The clock coils are fabric covered and look like they could be this old.

Many years ago I acquired a Hipp Clock with a Prolonged Impulse from England.  That is a project clock that was a monthly subject in an English publication, Model Engineer, and also in Hope-Jone's book, Electric Clocks and How to Make Them.  The clock may have never been finished as it did not have a clock works or any contact to send a pulse to a secondary clock.  I obtain a part from a Synchronome from a fellow in New Zealand.  That is how I learned about a Synchronome and Hope-Davis and so I have always wanted a Synchronome since then. The best I could come up with is the Pulsynetic. I now have it in great condition and it runs without trouble.  The Hipp clock was much harder to make run.     


Derek B
 

Dear Ernie,

Your Gent master clock is one of the earliest examples known with a serial number.  It dates from early in 1913.  Beat scales were introduced in the mid-1920’s.  As you have no doubt discovered, there are small brass screws set into the moulded top and bottom of the case which are used for setting vertical with a plumb line.  The spark suppression capacitor and coil are most probably later additions.  No 1391 has no spark suppression.  The picture shows the early date label in C6 No 1240, affixed to the case door.

The writer found an early double-dial Pulsynetic clock outside an old hotel in Santa Barbara many years ago.

The ‘Hipp Clock with Prolonged Impulse’ was a stand-alone timepiece, not an impulse transmitter.

As John has suggested, you would be welcomed to the ‘Electric Clocks’ website.

Derek B. 

Sent from Windows Mail

From: Ernie Jenson via Groups.Io
Sent: ‎Tuesday‎, ‎16‎ ‎April‎ ‎2019 ‎00‎:‎40
To: synchronome1@groups.io

Is this the group that I should address questions to regarding a Gent Pulsynetic?  We don't have many in California, but I do find much information on the internet. If this is the proper group then perhaps someone could help me with information. Should mine have had a scale at the bottom to monitor the degrees of swing of the pendulum?  I do not see any holes in the case where one would have been mounted.  There is just a small part of a label remaining on the top left corner of the case.  I was wondering what it would have stated.  There is a number stamped at the top of the case, 1301  If that is the serial number, then the clock would be over 100 years old.  I have my suspicion on that mater as the little coil that is for spark suppression looks to be enamel coated.  I though enamel coating didn't appear in clocks until the late twenties. The clock coils are fabric covered and look like they could be this old.

Many years ago I acquired a Hipp Clock with a Prolonged Impulse from England.  That is a project clock that was a monthly subject in an English publication, Model Engineer, and also in Hope-Jone's book, Electric Clocks and How to Make Them.  The clock may have never been finished as it did not have a clock works or any contact to send a pulse to a secondary clock.  I obtain a part from a Synchronome from a fellow in New Zealand.  That is how I learned about a Synchronome and Hope-Davis and so I have always wanted a Synchronome since then. The best I could come up with is the Pulsynetic. I now have it in great condition and it runs without trouble.  The Hipp clock was much harder to make run.     


Stuart Baskill
 

As you say it is around 1913.I have two Gent clocks with wooden pendulums that are earlier.How do you join the electric clocks website?

On ‎Tuesday‎, ‎16‎ ‎April‎ ‎2019‎ ‎21‎:‎40‎:‎27‎ ‎BST, Derek B via Groups.Io <dbird855@...> wrote:


Dear Ernie,

Your Gent master clock is one of the earliest examples known with a serial number.  It dates from early in 1913.  Beat scales were introduced in the mid-1920’s.  As you have no doubt discovered, there are small brass screws set into the moulded top and bottom of the case which are used for setting vertical with a plumb line.  The spark suppression capacitor and coil are most probably later additions.  No 1391 has no spark suppression.  The picture shows the early date label in C6 No 1240, affixed to the case door.

The writer found an early double-dial Pulsynetic clock outside an old hotel in Santa Barbara many years ago.

The ‘Hipp Clock with Prolonged Impulse’ was a stand-alone timepiece, not an impulse transmitter.

As John has suggested, you would be welcomed to the ‘Electric Clocks’ website.

Derek B. 

Sent from Windows Mail

From: Ernie Jenson via Groups.Io
Sent: ‎Tuesday‎, ‎16‎ ‎April‎ ‎2019 ‎00‎:‎40
To: synchronome1@groups.io

Is this the group that I should address questions to regarding a Gent Pulsynetic?  We don't have many in California, but I do find much information on the internet. If this is the proper group then perhaps someone could help me with information. Should mine have had a scale at the bottom to monitor the degrees of swing of the pendulum?  I do not see any holes in the case where one would have been mounted.  There is just a small part of a label remaining on the top left corner of the case.  I was wondering what it would have stated.  There is a number stamped at the top of the case, 1301  If that is the serial number, then the clock would be over 100 years old.  I have my suspicion on that mater as the little coil that is for spark suppression looks to be enamel coated.  I though enamel coating didn't appear in clocks until the late twenties. The clock coils are fabric covered and look like they could be this old.

Many years ago I acquired a Hipp Clock with a Prolonged Impulse from England.  That is a project clock that was a monthly subject in an English publication, Model Engineer, and also in Hope-Jone's book, Electric Clocks and How to Make Them.  The clock may have never been finished as it did not have a clock works or any contact to send a pulse to a secondary clock.  I obtain a part from a Synchronome from a fellow in New Zealand.  That is how I learned about a Synchronome and Hope-Davis and so I have always wanted a Synchronome since then. The best I could come up with is the Pulsynetic. I now have it in great condition and it runs without trouble.  The Hipp clock was much harder to make run.     


Martin Ridout
 

You will be welcome to join the electric-clocks group on groups.io.

Go to https://groups.io/g/electric-clocks and scroll down the page to find a link to 'Apply for membership of this group'. Click on this and follow the instructions.

Alternatively, send a blank email to
electric-clocks+subscribe@groups.io

Membership needs to be approved, which should only take a day or so.

Martin Ridout
Co-owner, electric-clocks@groups.io

On 16/04/2019 21:57, Stuart Baskill via Groups.Io wrote:
How do you join the electric clocks website?


Koen Roscam Abbing
 

Hello all,

 

Nobody mentions the stiffness of the suspension spring. I assume many Synchronomes have a replacemant suspension spring for the pendulum that is not exactly to original specifications. (Mine is part of a (used) razor blade, which has the pendulum happily swinging at 3.5). I'm quite sure this has an influence.


H Hal
 

For info,
 
Hope-Jones specifies the suspension spring as 1/2” X 7/8”
hole centres 15/32” apart
thicknes 0.005”
 
hope this helps someone
 
 
hal
 

From: Koen Roscam Abbing
Sent: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 10:51 PM
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pulsynetic 1301
 

Hello all,

 

Nobody mentions the stiffness of the suspension spring. I assume many Synchronomes have a replacemant suspension spring for the pendulum that is not exactly to original specifications. (Mine is part of a (used) razor blade, which has the pendulum happily swinging at 3.5). I'm quite sure this has an influence.


neil
 

I seem to recall from Robt J Matthys' book (Accurate Clock Pendulum) that the thickness is of little importance with regard to stiffness and energy losses, and the more important parameter is strength with regard to bob weight.

Neil Jepsen. B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons).CPL.MASNZ.
Jepsen Acoustics & Electronics Ltd
22 Domain Street
Palmerston North.
New Zealand.
Ph +64 6 3577539  Mob 0274428094
Web site: www.noiseandweather.co.nz
E.& O.E.
On 18/04/19 10:07 AM, H Hal via Groups.Io wrote:

For info,
 
Hope-Jones specifies the suspension spring as 1/2” X 7/8”
hole centres 15/32” apart
thicknes 0.005”
 
hope this helps someone
 
 
hal
 
From: Koen Roscam Abbing
Sent: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 10:51 PM
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pulsynetic 1301
 

Hello all,

 

Nobody mentions the stiffness of the suspension spring. I assume many Synchronomes have a replacemant suspension spring for the pendulum that is not exactly to original specifications. (Mine is part of a (used) razor blade, which has the pendulum happily swinging at 3.5). I'm quite sure this has an influence.



Ian Richardson
 

I find that very hard to believe from my practical experience.  I recently had a clock in which I replaced the suspension spring  and it refused to run for any length of time, and the arc was restricted.  I lapped the spring to thin it, and the clock has run happily ever since!!  I also know that the length of the spring has a profound bearing on the arc and hence time-keeping.

I've had similar experiences with turret clocks where, if the spring is too thick - and hence stiff - the clock is not happy.

Just a couple of observations from the "real world".

Ian R
Macclesfield, UK



-----Original Message-----
From: neil <njepsen@...>
To: synchronome1 <synchronome1@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, 18 Apr 2019 4:46
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pulsynetic 1301

I seem to recall from Robt J Matthys' book (Accurate Clock Pendulum) that the thickness is of little importance with regard to stiffness and energy losses, and the more important parameter is strength with regard to bob weight.

Neil Jepsen. B.Sc. M.Sc(Hons).CPL.MASNZ.
Jepsen Acoustics & Electronics Ltd
22 Domain Street
Palmerston North.
New Zealand.
Ph +64 6 3577539  Mob 0274428094
Web site: www.noiseandweather.co.nz
E.& O.E.
On 18/04/19 10:07 AM, H Hal via Groups.Io wrote:
For info,
 
Hope-Jones specifies the suspension spring as 1/2” X 7/8”
hole centres 15/32” apart
thicknes 0.005”
 
hope this helps someone
 
 
hal
 
Sent: Wednesday, April 17, 2019 10:51 PM
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pulsynetic 1301
 
Hello all,
 
Nobody mentions the stiffness of the suspension spring. I assume many Synchronomes have a replacemant suspension spring for the pendulum that is not exactly to original specifications. (Mine is part of a (used) razor blade, which has the pendulum happily swinging at 3.5). I'm quite sure this has an influence.


Ernie Jenson
 

Thanks for the reply with pictures and the information on the possible age of my clock, or should I say transmitter.  I will attempt to attach pictures.  I don't see any holes in the bottom of my case where a beat plate would have been located.  If it is too old to have one, then I will leave it original. My Pulsynetic slave is also very old.  The original face has roman numerals but all the white paint has fallen off.  I made the face that you see but I know the font is not accurate.  I could not locate the correct font.  I would sent the original out to be repainted but I want a face with Arabic numerals to match my transmitter.


Ernie Jenson
 

Sorry for the reversed picture.


Ernie Jenson
 



Derek B
 

Hello Ernie,

Thank you for the interesting pictures.  As often happens, a number of alterations are apparent.

The dial unit in No 1301 has a painted Arabic face of a style current c.1925-27.  The dial movement is a post-war example.  The Fig C10 12” dial impulse wall clock, if of similar date to your master clock, would originally have had a Roman dial as standard.  The original hands would have been of a plain ‘spade’ pattern and the 120-tooth wheel would have had a crossing space left solid (with added screw if necessary) to perfectly balance the minute hand.  Generally, wall clocks at that period just had “PULSYNETIC” in the upper portion and “ELECTRIC” below the centre, but later the makers’ name was added across the middle, as you have.

Derek B.

Sent from Windows Mail

From: Ernie Jenson via Groups.Io
Sent: ‎Monday‎, ‎22‎ ‎April‎ ‎2019 ‎22‎:‎13
To: synchronome1@groups.io

Thanks for the reply with pictures and the information on the possible age of my clock, or should I say transmitter.  I will attempt to attach pictures.  I don't see any holes in the bottom of my case where a beat plate would have been located.  If it is too old to have one, then I will leave it original. My Pulsynetic slave is also very old.  The original face has roman numerals but all the white paint has fallen off.  I made the face that you see but I know the font is not accurate.  I could not locate the correct font.  I would sent the original out to be repainted but I want a face with Arabic numerals to match my transmitter.


Ernie Jenson
 

Hello Derek,

Very interesting information.  Then I should get the Slave face repainted with the Roman font and find the correct font for the time unit in the transmitter.  The slave face is old but most likely not as old as the transmitter, as the original face is as as my copy but with the Roman font.  The two pictures attached show the works from the slave.  It is more like what you described but was probably from a slightly later period.  I thought that my transmitter probably had the wrong works as the base plate is stippled which is a technique of a much later period in time.  I expected the face in the transmitter to be correct.

Of course I didn't know what was the age of anything and that maybe the transmitter was not that old.  I locate the slave before I located the transmitter and was just happy to get them working together.

You have given me much to think about.  I want to thank you for this great information.  Learning about my clocks history gives me great joy and is as important as my getting them running the way they were when new.

Once again, thank you very much.

Ernie



Derek B
 

Hello Ernie,

Thanks for your email.  From the early ‘teens, the Fig C7 master clocks had either a painted Roman or a silvered Arabic face.  The painted dials are very prone to flaking (painted on zinc) and are often replaced.  Your example has a genuine Gent replacement so, it is of course up to you, but  I would leave it as it is.  Almost certainly Gent also replaced the dial movement at a later date, as the backplate has either been replaced or been repainted in the then current brown finish and a Bakelite terminal block added.  So these are part of the history of the clock and you can leave it as it is.  It is by no means unusual to find such ‘updates’. 

The Arabic numerals are not in any particular typeface, but are freely drawn, with ‘Art Nouveau’ influence, and were gradually refined over the years.  Most styles up to c.1928 had a ‘flat 8’ and a ‘falling 4’.  Examples turned out in c.1919 had an engraved dial in a style all their own. 

You are correct that the impulse movement in the C10 is a little later.  The black enamelled wire was current c.1916-27 for dial coils.

Best wishes,
Derek

Sent from Windows Mail

From: Ernie Jenson via Groups.Io
Sent: ‎Tuesday‎, ‎23‎ ‎April‎ ‎2019 ‎18‎:‎10
To: synchronome1@groups.io

Hello Derek,

Very interesting information.  Then I should get the Slave face repainted with the Roman font and find the correct font for the time unit in the transmitter.  The slave face is old but most likely not as old as the transmitter, as the original face is as as my copy but with the Roman font.  The two pictures attached show the works from the slave.  It is more like what you described but was probably from a slightly later period.  I thought that my transmitter probably had the wrong works as the base plate is stippled which is a technique of a much later period in time.  I expected the face in the transmitter to be correct.

Of course I didn't know what was the age of anything and that maybe the transmitter was not that old.  I locate the slave before I located the transmitter and was just happy to get them working together.

You have given me much to think about.  I want to thank you for this great information.  Learning about my clocks history gives me great joy and is as important as my getting them running the way they were when new.

Once again, thank you very much.

Ernie