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Help sought regarding T&N master clock


rdwiow
 

Good evening,
I have just bought a 1970 metal cased T&N master clock and I think it will be a runner with a small amount of tinkering.
Does anybody here have one?
If so, would they be kind enough to tell me how much the small powering weight should weigh as mine is not original.
Also, I don't think the mangled spring that takes power from the back flywheel to the front movement is original, if someone has one would they be able to photograph the spring so I can see what it should look like, I assume it is in the style of a compression (biro) type spring that is used in torsion? Also what gauge wire is it made from?
Does anyone have any instructions in English please?
I look forward to any help provided.
Thank you
Rob


RICHARD ADAMEK
 

Hi Rob, 

I have a couple in the light bluey Hammer finish, both ex Dictograph and both with metal pendulums and cylindrical bobs


Original (i.e. German) documentation here http://wp.clockdoc.org/documents/maker-doocumentation/    in the T&N section, Google Translate is your friend ;0

I'll see if I can get you weight and dims of the weight tomorrow, beware there may be a reason for this being tinkered with, the one I have without programmer dogged father for donkeys years and eventually dogged me after he passed on, it would stop for no readily apparent reason in cold weather as the impulse to the wheel appeared to diminish, he doubled the coil voltage and added forcing weights to the remontoire but without noticeable improvement.

I eventually found this was due to the woven fabric insulating sleeve on the soft return wire that runs to the contact on the periphery of the impulse wheel, it had absorbed airborne oil over its years in an engineering works and this stiffened as the temperature dropped, absorbing what was a consistent impulse from the solenoid, a delicate laundry job has cured this, voltage and forcing weights are now back to original and it hasn't faltered in the cold winters of the last few years - it lives outside in an unheated building.

They were always Dad's favourite Masters (and having been serially a 'guest' of both Germans and Russians believe you me things from those countries got no quarter!) so I assume were head and shoulders less trouble than the earlier clocks by Magneta etc. and one of these is the clock his colleagues renovated and presented to him on his retirement from what was by then TR.

If the spring you are talking about is where the dial part of the drive train separates from the mainframe, this is the flrxible drive to the beautiful little contrate wheeled differential which allows the weight drive to pre load and both turn the armature producing the alternating minute pulse while keeping load on the going train of what is really a very nice mechanical clock mechanism.

Hope I can help with any other aspects if the same model or principle and feel free to email off forum as it is not entirely clear yet if and how much our Synchronome specific colleagues welcome or may tolerate 'other makes' traffic on what is when all said and done a single make group.

(A T&N has the distinct advantage that it can be sneaked indoors and set agoing without the self denouncing 30 or 60 second PERDUNKKKKK :)

Cheers & beers

Richard 



On Friday, 18 January 2019, 20:47:57 GMT, rdwiow via Groups.Io <rdw.iow@...> wrote:


Good evening,
I have just bought a 1970 metal cased T&N master clock and I think it will be a runner with a small amount of tinkering.
Does anybody here have one?
If so, would they be kind enough to tell me how much the small powering weight should weigh as mine is not original.
Also, I don't think the mangled spring that takes power from the back flywheel to the front movement is original, if someone has one would they be able to photograph the spring so I can see what it should look like, I assume it is in the style of a compression (biro) type spring that is used in torsion? Also what gauge wire is it made from?
Does anyone have any instructions in English please?
I look forward to any help provided.
Thank you
Rob