Topics

Eureka spring


Philip Green
 

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Peter Torry
 

Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude.  If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter


On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:
Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Odell, Edward
 

HI

According to the Shenton book the 40 tooth wheel type has  a longer spring, the standard spring for the 45 tooth wheel should be 12 ¼ turns so check and see if wrong one fitted, but I don’t know the spring dimensions for the early beat rate clock

Eddy Odell

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Torry via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 18:41
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring

 

Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude.  If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter

 

On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Philip Green
 

Thank you Peter and Edward,

The spring has 12 1/2 turns and I have got it to its fullest extent so I will try undoing the screws and see what effect that has.

Thank you

Phil
 
 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 6:49 PM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

HI

According to the Shenton book the 40 tooth wheel type has  a longer spring, the standard spring for the 45 tooth wheel should be 12 ¼ turns so check and see if wrong one fitted, but I don’t know the spring dimensions for the early beat rate clock

Eddy Odell

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Torry via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 18:41
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring

 

Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude.  If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter

 

On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Ralph
 

The screws should be screwed down fully as original.  They must not be moved around, unless someone has moved them in the past and you are trying to correct it.. They are different weights. If you remove them, you will see they are undercut and vary in the amount.  I look at the balance as a unique style of compound pendulum.

Ralph



Philip Green wrote:

Thank you Peter and Edward,

The spring has 12 1/2 turns and I have got it to its fullest extent so I will try undoing the screws and see what effect that has.

Thank you

Phil
 
 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 6:49 PM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

HI

According to the Shenton book the 40 tooth wheel type has  a longer spring, the standard spring for the 45 tooth wheel should be 12 ¼ turns so check and see if wrong one fitted, but I don’t know the spring dimensions for the early beat rate clock

Eddy Odell

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Torry via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 18:41
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring

 

Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude.  If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter

 

On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com

--
PLEASE BE KIND TO YOUR EMAIL FRIENDS Before forwarding please remove all email addresses and use the BCC option to add your contacts. Failure to do so results in spam and email from people you don't know. THANK YOU


Odell, Edward
 

I was just about to reply something similar

No one really seems to know the significance of the differently sized weights but they are probably not designed to be adjustments, the inventor said the clock would run upside down so the idea this is some kind of pendulum isn’t correct.  That said I have had one with an unbalanced wheel running reasonably for many years, but the amplitude improved when correctly balanced. 

Eddy

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ralph via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 20:26
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring

 

The screws should be screwed down fully as original.  They must not be moved around, unless someone has moved them in the past and you are trying to correct it.. They are different weights. If you remove them, you will see they are undercut and vary in the amount.  I look at the balance as a unique style of compound pendulum.

Ralph


Philip Green wrote:

Thank you Peter and Edward,

 

The spring has 12 1/2 turns and I have got it to its fullest extent so I will try undoing the screws and see what effect that has.

 

Thank you

 

Phil

 

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 6:49 PM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

HI

According to the Shenton book the 40 tooth wheel type has  a longer spring, the standard spring for the 45 tooth wheel should be 12 ¼ turns so check and see if wrong one fitted, but I don’t know the spring dimensions for the early beat rate clock

Eddy Odell

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Torry via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 18:41
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring

 

Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude.  If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter

 

On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 

--
PLEASE BE KIND TO YOUR EMAIL FRIENDS Before forwarding please remove all email addresses and use the BCC option to add your contacts. Failure to do so results in spam and email from people you don't know. THANK YOU


Neville Michie
 

Somewhere in the past I recall reading of a Eureka that had lead washers
under its screws. That clock had been messed about, but it is a hint as
to how you could improve the situation without having to harm any existing
parts.
cheers,
Neville Michie

On 31 Dec 2020, at 07:29, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

I was just about to reply something similar

No one really seems to know the significance of the differently sized weights but they are probably not designed to be adjustments, the inventor said the clock would run upside down so the idea this is some kind of pendulum isn’t correct. That said I have had one with an unbalanced wheel running reasonably for many years, but the amplitude improved when correctly balanced.

Eddy





From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ralph via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 20:26
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring



The screws should be screwed down fully as original. They must not be moved around, unless someone has moved them in the past and you are trying to correct it.. They are different weights. If you remove them, you will see they are undercut and vary in the amount. I look at the balance as a unique style of compound pendulum.

Ralph



Philip Green wrote:

Thank you Peter and Edward,



The spring has 12 1/2 turns and I have got it to its fullest extent so I will try undoing the screws and see what effect that has.



Thank you



Phil








Virus-free. www.avg.com



On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 6:49 PM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

HI

According to the Shenton book the 40 tooth wheel type has a longer spring, the standard spring for the 45 tooth wheel should be 12 ¼ turns so check and see if wrong one fitted, but I don’t know the spring dimensions for the early beat rate clock

Eddy Odell



From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Torry via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 18:41
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring



Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude. If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter



On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining 50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil




Virus-free. www.avg.com



--
PLEASE BE KIND TO YOUR EMAIL FRIENDS Before forwarding please remove all email addresses and use the BCC option to add your contacts. Failure to do so results in spam and email from people you don't know. THANK YOU



Odell, Edward
 

When I was trying to find out about this for the Eureka information on the clockdoc website I wrote that one turn in or out of all the screws would be equivalent to about 15 seconds a day. I'm sorry I don't remember where I got that information from but that would mean that correcting your gaining rate is not going to be possible by doing that. I may have found that information in one of Peter Smith's excellent restoration papers on the clockdoc website. There are rather a lot of them to trawl through but you may find something in there as they are a mine of useful information

wp.clockdoc.org


Eddy

-----Original Message-----
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Neville Michie via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 21:16
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring

Somewhere in the past I recall reading of a Eureka that had lead washers under its screws. That clock had been messed about, but it is a hint as to how you could improve the situation without having to harm any existing parts.
cheers,
Neville Michie
. I'm sorry
On 31 Dec 2020, at 07:29, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

I was just about to reply something similar

No one really seems to know the significance of the differently sized weights but they are probably not designed to be adjustments, the inventor said the clock would run upside down so the idea this is some kind of pendulum isn't correct. That said I have had one with an unbalanced wheel running reasonably for many years, but the amplitude improved when correctly balanced.

Eddy





From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of
Ralph via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 20:26
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring



The screws should be screwed down fully as original. They must not be moved around, unless someone has moved them in the past and you are trying to correct it.. They are different weights. If you remove them, you will see they are undercut and vary in the amount. I look at the balance as a unique style of compound pendulum.

Ralph



Philip Green wrote:

Thank you Peter and Edward,



The spring has 12 1/2 turns and I have got it to its fullest extent so I will try undoing the screws and see what effect that has.



Thank you



Phil








Virus-free.
https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.a
vg.com%2F&amp;data=04%7C01%7Cedward.odell%40kcl.ac.uk%7Cdf20fc1245754e
0022be08d8ad082889%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0%7C0%7C637449
597868936589%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luM
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On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 6:49 PM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

HI

According to the Shenton book the 40 tooth wheel type has a longer
spring, the standard spring for the 45 tooth wheel should be 12 ¼
turns so check and see if wrong one fitted, but I don't know the
spring dimensions for the early beat rate clock

Eddy Odell



From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of
Peter Torry via groups.io
Sent: 30 December 2020 18:41
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Eureka spring



Hello Phil,

I am not aware of different sprigs being use but no doubt someone will correct me. The timing is affected by the weight and position of the screws around the periphery of the wheel and their adjustment will affect the timing and amplitude. If you thing of the wheel not as a poised balance wheel but as a rotary pendulum it may put a different light on the situation.

I do have some notes somewhere and I will look them out and copy them to you.

Kind regards

Peter



On 30/12/2020 16:44, Philip Green wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining 50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil




Virus-free.
https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.a
vg.com%2F&amp;data=04%7C01%7Cedward.odell%40kcl.ac.uk%7Cdf20fc1245754e
0022be08d8ad082889%7C8370cf1416f34c16b83c724071654356%7C0%7C0%7C637449
597868936589%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luM
zIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=828PP4c3F5FVJW6YDu%
2F%2FRZ1Rv2X%2F5dlE8tI9PpKiyDU%3D&amp;reserved=0



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THANK YOU



Peter Torry
 

A most interesting discussion. At an EHG meeting many years ago there was adiscussion on locking the Eureks to a quartz oscillator and I tried it but using a signal generator and it worked well.

I have found my notes although I cannot remember where they came from so apologies to the authors.

Kind regards

Peter

One of the key issues with these clocks - and one on which Dr Shenton is wrong - is the role of the big screws on the balance wheel. They vary in weight and their position on the wheel has a big difference in amplitude and rate The other issue is the ratchet that drives the motion work. The follower wheel needs too clear the cam at both ends of the swing. I attach a note I wrote a few years ago, based on ideas from Brian Mumford. Brian wrote A client recently brought me a Eureka that was terribly slow at a little over 2500 BPH instead of 2700. No adjustment of the star wheel or the balance spring clamp could bring it to time. I had previously learned that I could change the rate by adding lead weights under the hollow heads of the balance wheel screws, and I removed the screw from the lowest position to try this. My thinking was that if the balance wheel is bottom heavy it will run faster. But this screw was not hollow, so it was already as heavy as it could be. I have learned that heavy screws at the top side of the balance wheel tend to make the clock run slow, so I checked the top one, and it was solid too. I swapped the top solid screw with a near-bottom hollow one, and the rate jumped to 2900 BPH. I placed the solid screw in the position one down from the top position, and the clock ran at 2750 BPH. I then began to unscrew the top side screws from the balance wheel and brought the rate right to 2700. I now believe that a mixture of solid and hollow headed screws were used so that the rate could be coarsely adjusted by where the heavy screws were located. Adding weight to the top of the wheel, or raising the screw heads, slows the clock.

 

My Eureka has large balance screws with three different weights. Light - Hollow Heads about 2grams Medium - Heads half filled with lead 3 grams Heavy - Heads full of lead 4grams Swapping light for heavy between the top (Balance wheel at the point of impulse) and bottom changes the rate significantly. As Brian says decreasing the weight at the bottom slows the clock down (and increases the amplitude). Decreasing the weight at the top (decreases the amplitude) and speeds it up. The Eureka balance wheel it not a true "free pendulum". The energy of the impulse not only overcomes the usual losses, but also provides all the power to drive the motion work. So the energy transfer to and from the balance wheel is much higher than on a conventional clock. On the forward swing the energy from the impulse goes into three places (ignoring friction and other losses) - the spring, driving the motion work, and into changes in the potential energy of imbalance in the weight of the balance wheel. If the top is light and the bottom heavy, gravity assists the spring in absorbing the kinetic energy of the swing so the swing is shortened. If the top is heavy and the bottom light the spring has to absorb both the kinetic energy of the swing and the potential energy released by the centre of mass of the wheel falling so lengthening the arc. In a perfect balance wheel this would should not affect the rate, but in the Eureka the reverse swing has lost all the energy needed to drive the motion work. This difference in energy in the two swings seems to mean that the gravity component has a much greater influence. Short arcs increase the rate and make the clock gain, long arcs make the clock slow. (BTW a very flat battery makes the arc smaller and the clock also gains until the arc gets too small to drive the motion work reliably then it loses - most counter intuitive!) Sounds like you need to swap some weight to the top of your balance wheel.


On 30/12/2020 21:21, Odell, Edward via groups.io wrote:
When I was trying to find out about this for the Eureka information on the clockdoc website I wrote that one turn in or out of all the screws would be equivalent to about 15 seconds a day. I'm sorry I don't remember where I got that information from but that would mean that correcting your gaining rate is not going to be possible by doing that. I may have found that information in one of Peter Smith's excellent restoration papers on the clockdoc website. There are rather a lot of them to trawl through but you may find something in there as they are a mine of useful information

wp.clockdoc.org


Eddy


Harvey Moseley
 

Phil, 
Does the clock have a mechanism for turning the other end of the spring to change the spring constant?
H


On Dec 30, 2020, at 11:44 AM, Philip Green <phil.dagreen@...> wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Philip Green
 

Thank you to all those who have responded to my request for help.

I tried unscrewing all the large screws on the balance and it slowed the rate slightly but nowhere near enough to correct the timing error that I have. My next approach will be to start adjusting the positions of the screws according to Peter's notes. 

Regards

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 10:56 PM Harvey Moseley <harvey.moseley1@...> wrote:
Phil, 
Does the clock have a mechanism for turning the other end of the spring to change the spring constant?
H


On Dec 30, 2020, at 11:44 AM, Philip Green <phil.dagreen@...> wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Philip Green
 

Hello Peter,

Thank you for the information which works as you well know! I moved one solid screw from the bottom to the top of the balance which turned the rate from gaining to losing!!
So with more time I shall be able to find the sweet spot?  The balance also went from 270 degrees to 340 degrees. Success!

Thank you

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com


On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 4:39 PM Philip Green via groups.io <phil.dagreen=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thank you to all those who have responded to my request for help.

I tried unscrewing all the large screws on the balance and it slowed the rate slightly but nowhere near enough to correct the timing error that I have. My next approach will be to start adjusting the positions of the screws according to Peter's notes. 

Regards

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 10:56 PM Harvey Moseley <harvey.moseley1@...> wrote:
Phil, 
Does the clock have a mechanism for turning the other end of the spring to change the spring constant?
H


On Dec 30, 2020, at 11:44 AM, Philip Green <phil.dagreen@...> wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Peter Torry
 

Hello Phil,

Happy New  Year to you and the group members.

I am pleased that you have made some improvement and I am sure that a little experimentation will bring the result that you desire.

Kind regards

Peter


On 01/01/2021 16:28, Philip Green wrote:
Hello Peter,

Thank you for the information which works as you well know! I moved one solid screw from the bottom to the top of the balance which turned the rate from gaining to losing!!
So with more time I shall be able to find the sweet spot?  The balance also went from 270 degrees to 340 degrees. Success!

Thank you

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 4:39 PM Philip Green via groups.io <phil.dagreen=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thank you to all those who have responded to my request for help.

I tried unscrewing all the large screws on the balance and it slowed the rate slightly but nowhere near enough to correct the timing error that I have. My next approach will be to start adjusting the positions of the screws according to Peter's notes. 

Regards

Phil


Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Wed, Dec 30, 2020 at 10:56 PM Harvey Moseley <harvey.moseley1@...> wrote:
Phil, 
Does the clock have a mechanism for turning the other end of the spring to change the spring constant?
H


On Dec 30, 2020, at 11:44 AM, Philip Green <phil.dagreen@...> wrote:

Hello,
I have at last got myself an Eureka clock (No not a Christmas present!) and am having trouble with the balance spring. The timed rate of the spring and balance is 1.45 sec approx. which ties in with the clock gaining  50 min in 24 hours. The count wheel is 40 teeth. So I am looking for a rate of 1.5 sec. Were there different springs for the two different count wheels or should I be looking somewhere else to adjust for the timing?

My other problem with the clock is the base which has a fair amount of battery acid corrosion. Is there an easier way of removing it other than scraping it?

Thank you and I wish you all a happy New Year and an end to Covid!!

Phil


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