Synchronome contacts pitted


Odell, Edward
 

Dear Howard

 

I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting

I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.

I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 

I wondered whether anyone had tried it?

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts

 

Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard


lister53827
 

Hi All, 

Not sure if this will help, it is a GPO contact doming drawing. Some were riveted, some were not. 


Simon GPO Clocks
 

On 13 Feb 2021, at 23:20pm, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell@...> wrote:

Dear Howard
 
I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting
I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.
I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 
I wondered whether anyone had tried it?
 
Eddy Odell
 
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts
 
Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard 



lister53827
 

Damn I used my internal server link sorry, try again. https://www.lightstraw.uk/gpo/clocksystems/pages/sco129.html

Some were riveted, others were welded. I guess if there is no expectancy of heat, then soldering may well work.

Simon GPO Clocks



On 14 Feb 2021, at 19:51pm, lister53827 via groups.io <lister53827@...> wrote:

Hi All, 

Not sure if this will help, it is a GPO contact doming drawing. Some were riveted, some were not. 


Simon GPO Clocks
 

On 13 Feb 2021, at 23:20pm, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell@...> wrote:

Dear Howard
 
I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting
I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.
I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 
I wondered whether anyone had tried it?
 
Eddy Odell
 
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts
 
Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard 




James Meaton
 

From what I remember the Post Office 3000 relays with the little nick in the end of the contact blades were the ones fitted with platinum contacts, but they are very small so would have to be melted down together to form a decent sized ingot.  At that time, unscrupulous scrap dealers and metal merchants used to advertise in Exchange and Mart (The Burglar’s Gazette) offering money for these relays without any reference to the fact that they were only interested in the platinum contacts! 
James Meaton



On 14 Feb 2021, at 18:51, lister53827 via groups.io <lister53827@...> wrote:

Hi All, 

Not sure if this will help, it is a GPO contact doming drawing. Some were riveted, some were not. 


Simon GPO Clocks
 

On 13 Feb 2021, at 23:20pm, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell@...> wrote:

Dear Howard
 
I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting
I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.
I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 
I wondered whether anyone had tried it?
 
Eddy Odell
 
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts
 
Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard 




lister53827
 

That is correct the plat. ones had a nick in the end. Clock 36 and 46 contacts were 90 plat 10 iridium.

I will (try) to attach a PDF on reforming relay contacts, it may have some relevance here.


Simon GPO clocks





On 14 Feb 2021, at 20:00pm, James Meaton via groups.io <soundhutch@...> wrote:

From what I remember the Post Office 3000 relays with the little nick in the end of the contact blades were the ones fitted with platinum contacts, but they are very small so would have to be melted down together to form a decent sized ingot.  At that time, unscrupulous scrap dealers and metal merchants used to advertise in Exchange and Mart (The Burglar’s Gazette) offering money for these relays without any reference to the fact that they were only interested in the platinum contacts! 
James Meaton



On 14 Feb 2021, at 18:51, lister53827 via groups.io <lister53827@...> wrote:

Hi All, 

Not sure if this will help, it is a GPO contact doming drawing. Some were riveted, some were not. 


Simon GPO Clocks
 

On 13 Feb 2021, at 23:20pm, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell@...> wrote:

Dear Howard
 
I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting
I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.
I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 
I wondered whether anyone had tried it?
 
Eddy Odell
 
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts
 
Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard 





James Meaton
 

Its great to know some of my old anorak knowledge is useful and mostly correct😎.
James Meaton



On 14 Feb 2021, at 19:24, lister53827 via groups.io <lister53827@...> wrote:

That is correct the plat. ones had a nick in the end. Clock 36 and 46 contacts were 90 plat 10 iridium.

I will (try) to attach a PDF on reforming relay contacts, it may have some relevance here.


Simon GPO clocks





On 14 Feb 2021, at 20:00pm, James Meaton via groups.io <soundhutch@...> wrote:

From what I remember the Post Office 3000 relays with the little nick in the end of the contact blades were the ones fitted with platinum contacts, but they are very small so would have to be melted down together to form a decent sized ingot.  At that time, unscrupulous scrap dealers and metal merchants used to advertise in Exchange and Mart (The Burglar’s Gazette) offering money for these relays without any reference to the fact that they were only interested in the platinum contacts! 
James Meaton



On 14 Feb 2021, at 18:51, lister53827 via groups.io <lister53827@...> wrote:

Hi All, 

Not sure if this will help, it is a GPO contact doming drawing. Some were riveted, some were not. 


Simon GPO Clocks
 

On 13 Feb 2021, at 23:20pm, Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell@...> wrote:

Dear Howard
 
I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting
I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.
I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 
I wondered whether anyone had tried it?
 
Eddy Odell
 
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts
 
Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard 




<h5006 relay contacts.pdf>


N Linn
 

Dear guys,

I'm looking for synchronome pallet details.  Is there any CAD drawing of pallet with the detailed measurements. I need to make a new one as i could get replcement part around me. I'm from Burma. Apologies if my query not related to this discussion but I believed this community can help me huge.

Best regards,
Naing 

On Sun, Feb 14, 2021, 4:51 AM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Dear Howard

 

I have a very similar or worse pitting in an early clock in which the spark quench resistors were broken in both slave and master, presumably accelerating the deep pitting

I was thinking of just melting the solder and quickly rotating the platinum 180 degrees to bring the flat part into service. Of course you could also turn it over, with a little more work cleaning it all up, so that the pit no longer shows.  I was hoping it could just be turned quickly retaining a functional solder joint without cleaning it all up and fluxing it.

I was therefore interested to see in James’s post that later contacts were just soft soldered, so this should be relatively easy. 

I wondered whether anyone had tried it?

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 13 February 2021 18:39
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts

 

Hi
What is the correct fix for warn contacts, the contact on the gravity arm is pitted without a lot of meat remaining and on the armature warn down close to the thread. I have not tried the clock and of course other issues may surface but state of points is a concern. Perhaps spares are available!!
Howard


--
Naing


hansford@...
 

Hello Chaps,

Worn out contacts are one of the biggest problems (actually probably the commonest) with old Synchronome master clocks, much more common than with Gents clocks.  The culprit is the skimpy diameter of the platinum wire fixed in the end of the Contact Screw – 1.5 mm, giving an area of 1.77 sq mm.  By comparison the contact on a standard Gents is 3/16 in. diameter with a massive area of 17.8 sq. mm., more than ten times greater, but dealing with a similar current.  The wire wears away and tends to bore a hole in the square platinum pad fixed to the gravity arm and often, but not always, the latter can be salvaged by re-soldering it in a slightly different position.

Fortunately for me, I still have a few grams of platinum to re-make the odd square pad.  This goes back more than 50 years when I worked for a company called British Telecommunications Research, part of the Plessey Co, and in those days Telecoms’ meant Telephony and Telegraphy and automatic telephone exchanges were almost exclusively electro-mechanical.  Although we were working on future electronic systems, relays were still widely used and old bits of gear bristling with PO type 3000 relays were for ever being chucked in the skip
.

Much to my amazement very few engineers were aware or interested in the fact that some relays were fitted with platinum points and even fewer knew how to recognise them.  The net result was that when, at lunchtime, I used to visit the skip I generally had it all to my self and used to check over new arrivals for platinum (Pt).  Loose relays I would take back to my desk but if the item was too large, I would simply cut off the entire contact springs.  Back at my desk I would then recover the Pt.  I found that the vast majority of Pt points were one of two types: If there was Pt on only one side of the spring, the Pt point would be a very small bump, simply flat on one side and domed on the other and spot welded in place.  They could be forced off by bending the spring and, if necessary, helping with a small pair of wire cutters.  If, on the other hand Pt points were opposite each other on both sides of the spring, they were much more substantial, rivetted through and in the form of a double ended mushroom.  These I normally removed by splitting through the spring alongside the contact with a hefty pair of wire cutters when the contact would pop out.

At the time I had access to Oxy-Acetylene and I found that I could melt my booty on a Charcoal Block with a groove cut in it to form a little ingot like a Twiglet.  In order to do it safely one needs an extremely dark green pair of goggles because it melts at a couple of hundred degrees Celsius above Steel.  Molten Pt is extraordinary because it does not tarnish and stays shimmering like Mercury even though more than white hot and even when it cools it stays shiny.  Unknown to me at the time, neither Acetylene or Charcoal are ideal as molten Pt can absorb carbon which can cause embrittlement.  This I subsequently discovered when I made my Wife’s engagement and wedding rings from Pt!

However, none of the above is of much use to other Synchronome owners.  I hope I can be more useful when it comes to the Contact Screw.  Having laboured on with worn-out contacts on some of my Synchronomes I thought the time had come to do something.  If I had just had one to do I would probably have fashioned a new one from a bit of my scrap but with several I thought I would take the easy way out and order some 1.5 mm Pt wire.  I knew a firm called Cooksongold (the Jewellers equivalent of Cousins or Meadows & Passmore in the clock world) sold Pt and had a very good Website and I found that they stocked sheet, tube, strip and wire in a range of sizes available by length or by the gram.  I ordered a 25 mm length of 1.5 mm wire which duly arrived a couple of days later and cost me £39.20 including postage and VAT.  This I cut into six 4 mm lengths (enough for my clocks and those of a friend) which worked out at only £6.53 per clock.  I can’t see that any Synchronome enthusiast is going to baulk at paying such a modest sum to give their clock(s) a new lease of life.  I suspect that Cooksongold’s minimum order is more than 4 mm but there is nothing to stop several people from clubbing together…

So how did I chop up my piece without wasting any and with the minimum of finishing necessary?  I first made sure that my wire was straight and at least one end circular by rolling it between two flat surfaces.  I had a rummage in my scrap collection and came up with two bits of flat, smooth steel, then drilled a 1.2 mm hole in each piece and progressively opened each hole, 0.1 mm at a time until the wire would just pass through, being careful to ensure that the edge was kept as sharp as possible.  All that was then necessary was to hold one piece vertically in the vice, pass the wire through both holes the requisite amount and, holding the two pieces of steel in close contact between finger and thumb, whack the loose piece sharply with a Thor Hammer to neatly sheer-off the wanted length of wire!

As for the worn-out screw contacts I found the remnants of Pt very difficult to extract and, in the end, resorted to drilling them out in the lathe.  Ideally drill out enough so that the new contact protrudes by between 2.5 and 3 mm.  All that’s then needed is to hold the screw vertically between soft jaws in the vice, pop a little solder paste into the hole followed by the new contact and then apply some heat using a small heat gun as used for working with surface mount electronic components until the solder flashes all the way round. (A jewellers’ gas torch would probably work equally well.)  You might want to polish the business end and the job’s done.

P.S.  here is a link to Cooksongold –

Platinum Wire | Platinum Wire For Jewellery Making - Cooksongold

from which I see that the price of Pt wire has shot up from £32.80 last August to £40.73 on February 16 2021.  Bad news I’m afraid.

Kind Regards

Laurence Hansford


bailey.services@...
 

Thanks for sharing your experience refurbishing, I guess Pt is used because it's harder than silver, Perhaps a silver nickel coin could be used for the contact pad.

One source of childhood pocket money was twisting out the silver contacts from Rank Xerox relays, happy days!

Regards Howard


H Hal
 

Platinum is highly unreactive and so will not "burn" (oxidise) even in sparking conditions. As a contact it will retain its "clean" surface


hal


uk

On 17/02/2021 21:33, bailey.services via groups.io wrote:
Thanks for sharing your experience refurbishing, I guess Pt is used because it's harder than silver, Perhaps a silver nickel coin could be used for the contact pad.

One source of childhood pocket money was twisting out the silver contacts from Rank Xerox relays, happy days!

Regards Howard


hansford@...
 

 Sorry Gentlemen – CORRECTION!!

I am afraid I was relying on my memory when I said that the Gents contacts were 0.187“diameter so I went and checked on my clocks.  I was actually partially correct – the contact fixed to the armature is as above but the other one, fixed to the gravity arm is smaller, at ⅛” diameter.  None the less this is still 4.45 times the area of 1.5 mm.

I also attach a photo of a rejuvenated Synchronome contact.

 

 

My apologies

Laurence Hansford


Brian Cracknell
 

Laurence,
This has been a very useful email chain and the end result looks great - far more lead in the pencil now so to speak.
I have just checked and the minimum length order for round 1.5mm Pt from Cooksongold is 5mm for £8.30 plus postage so not too bad really and about the same as a Brocot jewel which is needed from time to time. Also I think they can cut a 4mm length for the same price.
My contact is down to < 2mm so sometime in the future I may take this job on although I have never measured the rate of wear. There is the dent on the gravity arm contact as well now I actually look at it.
Out of interest, where does the vanished Pt end up? Vapourised? Turned into some sort of oxide? Or just ground down with friction and left to accumulate as a fine dust at the bottom of the case?

Regards
Brian


From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> on behalf of hansford@... <hansford@...>
Sent: 17 February 2021 22:08
To: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted
 

 Sorry Gentlemen – CORRECTION!!

I am afraid I was relying on my memory when I said that the Gents contacts were 0.187“diameter so I went and checked on my clocks.  I was actually partially correct – the contact fixed to the armature is as above but the other one, fixed to the gravity arm is smaller, at ⅛” diameter.  None the less this is still 4.45 times the area of 1.5 mm.

I also attach a photo of a rejuvenated Synchronome contact.

 

 

My apologies

Laurence Hansford


Odell, Edward
 

Hi Naing,

 

It doesn’t look as though anyone can help you with a CAD drawing, so perhaps this is useful.  The wire is 1/32 inch or 0.8mm steel, one end hammered flat and bent into a loop with 2mm diameter.  The jewel is a 2mm brocot jewel fitted into the loop. The other end is bent at 90 degrees  and the distance between the flat face of the jewel and the centre of the bent wire is 35mm (in most standard clocks).  The bent part is ¼ inch long.

Hope that makes sense without a diagram, I assume you have  a broken one or a picture to copy

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn via groups.io
Sent: 17 February 2021 05:28
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Dear guys,

 

I'm looking for synchronome pallet details.  Is there any CAD drawing of pallet with the detailed measurements. I need to make a new one as i could get replcement part around me. I'm from Burma. Apologies if my query not related to this discussion but I believed this community can help me huge.

 

Best regards,

Naing 

 

 


bailey.services@...
 

Hi pallet design drawing is on NAWCC clock forum website dated 17 sept 2007 posted by fdew


Stephen Hibbs
 

Hi, Naing,

There are reproduction gathering arms for sale right now on eBay for 25 US dollars plus a nominal shipping cost. Just enter the search term “Synchronome”. Making one would be an interesting challenge, but if you want one right now, here you go.

Stephen Hibbs
PO Box 536
Markleeville, CA 96120
530-694-1045




On Feb 18, 2021, at 12:19 PM, bailey.services via groups.io <bailey.services@...> wrote:

Hi pallet design drawing is on NAWCC clock forum website dated 17 sept 2007 posted by fdew


N Linn
 

Hi Eddy and Stephen,

Thank you so much for your kind help and sharing information. I think you are talking about the gathering arm. I also noticed there are listings of the arm and suspension spring on ebay. What i actually needed is the the whole pallet attached to the pensulum rod. I realized it is not easy to get such replacement part and I'm considering to make one by myself and looking for detailed measurement.

Attached is the movement which i only have. 

Best regards,
Naing


On Fri, Feb 19, 2021, 12:38 AM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Naing,

 

It doesn’t look as though anyone can help you with a CAD drawing, so perhaps this is useful.  The wire is 1/32 inch or 0.8mm steel, one end hammered flat and bent into a loop with 2mm diameter.  The jewel is a 2mm brocot jewel fitted into the loop. The other end is bent at 90 degrees  and the distance between the flat face of the jewel and the centre of the bent wire is 35mm (in most standard clocks).  The bent part is ¼ inch long.

Hope that makes sense without a diagram, I assume you have  a broken one or a picture to copy

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn via groups.io
Sent: 17 February 2021 05:28
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Dear guys,

 

I'm looking for synchronome pallet details.  Is there any CAD drawing of pallet with the detailed measurements. I need to make a new one as i could get replcement part around me. I'm from Burma. Apologies if my query not related to this discussion but I believed this community can help me huge.

 

Best regards,

Naing 

 

 


--
Naing


Stephen Hibbs
 

Hi again, Naing,

Keep an eye on the “Synchronome" search term on eBay. I have seen the part you need, though it's not there currently.

I’ve also seen much discussion of the profile of the pallet on this forum—the “ramp” that’s engaged by the roller on the gravity arm when it drops. I wonder myself if the exact curve of the profile is really important at all. What made me wonder is that the Gents Pul-Sy-Etic uses a perfectly straight ramp with no curvature at all and it works perfectly well. The fundamental idea, after all, is to transfer a certain amount of potential energy to the pendulum in the available engagement time. I suspect Frank Hope-Jones would strenuously disagree with me, but I really doubt that the profile makes enough difference to justify the complication of a curve. The takeaway for you is that, if you end up making your own pallet, you can at least start making it with a straight ramp instead of a curved one and see how it works. It will simplify the fabrication, as it did for Gents. If it does work and you’re not further concerned with originality, your pallet is finished. If it doesn’t work, you can still convert the ramp to the curve.

And if you pursue this suggestion, I’d like to know how it turns out.

Steve

Stephen Hibbs
PO Box 536
Markleeville, CA 96120
530-694-1045




On Feb 18, 2021, at 7:58 PM, N Linn <naingtlin@...> wrote:

Hi Eddy and Stephen,

Thank you so much for your kind help and sharing information. I think you are talking about the gathering arm. I also noticed there are listings of the arm and suspension spring on ebay. What i actually needed is the the whole pallet attached to the pensulum rod. I realized it is not easy to get such replacement part and I'm considering to make one by myself and looking for detailed measurement.

Attached is the movement which i only have. 

Best regards,
Naing


On Fri, Feb 19, 2021, 12:38 AM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Naing,

 

It doesn’t look as though anyone can help you with a CAD drawing, so perhaps this is useful.  The wire is 1/32 inch or 0.8mm steel, one end hammered flat and bent into a loop with 2mm diameter.  The jewel is a 2mm brocot jewel fitted into the loop. The other end is bent at 90 degrees  and the distance between the flat face of the jewel and the centre of the bent wire is 35mm (in most standard clocks).  The bent part is ¼ inch long.

Hope that makes sense without a diagram, I assume you have  a broken one or a picture to copy

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn via groups.io
Sent: 17 February 2021 05:28
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Dear guys,

 

I'm looking for synchronome pallet details.  Is there any CAD drawing of pallet with the detailed measurements. I need to make a new one as i could get replcement part around me. I'm from Burma. Apologies if my query not related to this discussion but I believed this community can help me huge.

 

Best regards,

Naing 

 

 




-- 
Naing<IMG_20210213_163633.jpg>


bailey.services@...
 

http://lbpinc.com/Synchronome/78%20Brass%20Impulse%20Pallet%20Machined.PDF

Taken from fdew post 17 Sept 2007 on NAWCC electric clock forum. Links to other drawings also referred to on that web site


Norman Heckenberg
 
Edited

Dear Naing,

I have attached a photo of the diagram in F. Hope-Jones, ‘Electric Clocks and how to make them’, Percival Marshall, London, n.d., that shows how to make the pallet.

That book could probably answer many questions for you as it describes how to make the whole clock, and some others.

I hope that helps.

Norman

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn
Sent: Friday, 19 February 2021 2:59 PM
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Hi Eddy and Stephen,

 

Thank you so much for your kind help and sharing information. I think you are talking about the gathering arm. I also noticed there are listings of the arm and suspension spring on ebay. What i actually needed is the the whole pallet attached to the pensulum rod. I realized it is not easy to get such replacement part and I'm considering to make one by myself and looking for detailed measurement.

 

Attached is the movement which i only have. 

 

Best regards,

Naing

 

 

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021, 12:38 AM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Naing,

 

It doesn’t look as though anyone can help you with a CAD drawing, so perhaps this is useful.  The wire is 1/32 inch or 0.8mm steel, one end hammered flat and bent into a loop with 2mm diameter.  The jewel is a 2mm brocot jewel fitted into the loop. The other end is bent at 90 degrees  and the distance between the flat face of the jewel and the centre of the bent wire is 35mm (in most standard clocks).  The bent part is ¼ inch long.

Hope that makes sense without a diagram, I assume you have  a broken one or a picture to copy

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn via groups.io
Sent: 17 February 2021 05:28
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Dear guys,

 

I'm looking for synchronome pallet details.  Is there any CAD drawing of pallet with the detailed measurements. I need to make a new one as i could get replcement part around me. I'm from Burma. Apologies if my query not related to this discussion but I believed this community can help me huge.

 

Best regards,

Naing 

 

 


--
Naing


N Linn
 

Dear Stephen,

Thanks so much for helping me with ideas. 

And to Norman, you provided me a drawing I couldn't find anywhere and that will definitely help me able to make a copy. 

Thanks again dears!

Best wishes,
Naing

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021, 3:59 PM Norman Heckenberg <heckenberg@...> wrote:

Dear Naing,

I have attached a photo of the diagram in F. Hope-Jones, ‘Electric Clocks and how to make them’, Percival Marshall, London, n.d., that shows how to make the pallet.

That book could probably answer many questions for you as it describes how to make the whole clock, and some others.

I hope that helps.

Norman

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn
Sent: Friday, 19 February 2021 2:59 PM
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Hi Eddy and Stephen,

 

Thank you so much for your kind help and sharing information. I think you are talking about the gathering arm. I also noticed there are listings of the arm and suspension spring on ebay. What i actually needed is the the whole pallet attached to the pensulum rod. I realized it is not easy to get such replacement part and I'm considering to make one by myself and looking for detailed measurement.

 

Attached is the movement which i only have. 

 

Best regards,

Naing

 

 

On Fri, Feb 19, 2021, 12:38 AM Odell, Edward via groups.io <edward.odell=kcl.ac.uk@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Naing,

 

It doesn’t look as though anyone can help you with a CAD drawing, so perhaps this is useful.  The wire is 1/32 inch or 0.8mm steel, one end hammered flat and bent into a loop with 2mm diameter.  The jewel is a 2mm brocot jewel fitted into the loop. The other end is bent at 90 degrees  and the distance between the flat face of the jewel and the centre of the bent wire is 35mm (in most standard clocks).  The bent part is ¼ inch long.

Hope that makes sense without a diagram, I assume you have  a broken one or a picture to copy

 

Eddy Odell

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of N Linn via groups.io
Sent: 17 February 2021 05:28
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome contacts pitted

 

Dear guys,

 

I'm looking for synchronome pallet details.  Is there any CAD drawing of pallet with the detailed measurements. I need to make a new one as i could get replcement part around me. I'm from Burma. Apologies if my query not related to this discussion but I believed this community can help me huge.

 

Best regards,

Naing 

 

 


--
Naing


--
Naing