Synchronome battery life


John Hubert
 

Howard, your clock would date to circa 1935 - but you probably kew that anyway!

John

On 15 Jan 2021, at 19:11, bailey.services via groups.io <bailey.services@...> wrote:

#2054 is very much standard, coils green, finish crackle, buffer yes, case oak flat top, pilot no 1. type small movement. I've no idea what Roller wire/plate refers to! 

Clockdoc website interesting resource, many thanks.
Howard


bailey.services@...
 

#2054 is very much standard, coils green, finish crackle, buffer yes, case oak flat top, pilot no 1. type small movement. I've no idea what Roller wire/plate refers to! 

Clockdoc website interesting resource, many thanks.
Howard


bailey.services@...
 

You are right, connected to power supply unit which masked the problem but again it stopped overnight. Investigating further found gap across contacts had increased. Having set the gaps at normal room temperature and finger tight it had loosened and widened perhaps exasperated by lower temperature.

Running again on 3 volts battery power and hopefully a years trouble free running ahead.
Howard


Andrew Nahum
 

I have run mine for many years on 3 volts - two Duracell D cells. Ihave consistently found that a pair lasts about a year, give or take. (I'm driving a single dial - just the clock's own one). If the latch was not re-setting after 45 days I would be looking at all the adjustments of coil-armature gap, contact gap and so on. It is true that fresh batteries can overcome some minor misadjustments in the re-latching process.

V best

Andrew


On Thu, Jan 14, 2021 at 8:47 PM bailey.services via groups.io <bailey.services=btinternet.com@groups.io> wrote:
My Synchronome #2054 ran for 45 days before latch failed to reset. Setup is transmitter and pilot at 11.5 ohms running at nominal 3 volts and 280mA from 2 Energizer Max D batteries. Thought it might do better, how do others get on with running on a small battery pack? 

Since Christmas week clock temperature has been dropping to 1.5C degrees overnight and not much warmer in the day against previous temperature around 12C. I expected the daily loss rate would be reduced as length of pendulum reduced but loss actually increased (from -2.5 to -3.5 per day). Maybe the cast iron bob is contracting more and increasing the overall length or is something else going on?

Not much showing on the forum so thought I might post my casual observations! 
All the best for 2021
Howard



Odell, Edward
 

Hi Howard,

 

That should be a standard 1930s synchronome. If it has a pilot dial then it is normally run on 6 V (nominally 4.5v master + 1.5 per slave, though of course as you say it is designed for constant current), and one set of cells should last you well over a year, probably two

 

your serial number is not listed in the serial number list on clockdoc (in the synchronome documents folder under synchronome at wp.clockdoc.org) . It would be great if you could check out the features and let us know what to add, especially if you have any accurate dating information.

 

Thanks

Eddy Odell

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of bailey.services via groups.io
Sent: 14 January 2021 20:46
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: [synchronomeelectricclock] Synchronome battery life

 

My Synchronome #2054 ran for 45 days before latch failed to reset. Setup is transmitter and pilot at 11.5 ohms running at nominal 3 volts and 280mA from 2 Energizer Max D batteries. Thought it might do better, how do others get on with running on a small battery pack? 

Since Christmas week clock temperature has been dropping to 1.5C degrees overnight and not much warmer in the day against previous temperature around 12C. I expected the daily loss rate would be reduced as length of pendulum reduced but loss actually increased (from -2.5 to -3.5 per day). Maybe the cast iron bob is contracting more and increasing the overall length or is something else going on?

Not much showing on the forum so thought I might post my casual observations! 
All the best for 2021
Howard


John Hubert
 

I can’t comment on power consumption as I run several clocks from a float charged battery (multiple C sized NiMH cells - now about 15 years old) - but 280 mA is on the low side for a Synchronome.  300 - 330 mA is more usual.  Low temperature will reduce battery capacity, though I don’t know by how much, and will also increase internal resistance, but I doubt this would be significant at approx 300 mA.

The rod is Invar, which has a very low temperature coefficient of expansion.  The iron bob will have a much higher coefficient of expansion.  Atmospheric pressure is also a factor.  

My own Synchronome sits in a relatively constant temperature and has a lead bob.  Variation (per day) is low with temperature change, typically 10 degrees Fahrenheit fall increases the clock ‘rate’ from approx 0 seconds per day to +0.3 second per day, but this is a very approximate measurement by simple visual observation against a Junghans radio controlled clock as reference (and averaged over a week rolling average).

John

On 14 Jan 2021, at 20:45, bailey.services via groups.io <bailey.services@...> wrote:

My Synchronome #2054 ran for 45 days before latch failed to reset. Setup is transmitter and pilot at 11.5 ohms running at nominal 3 volts and 280mA from 2 Energizer Max D batteries. Thought it might do better, how do others get on with running on a small battery pack? 

Since Christmas week clock temperature has been dropping to 1.5C degrees overnight and not much warmer in the day against previous temperature around 12C. I expected the daily loss rate would be reduced as length of pendulum reduced but loss actually increased (from -2.5 to -3.5 per day). Maybe the cast iron bob is contracting more and increasing the overall length or is something else going on?

Not much showing on the forum so thought I might post my casual observations! 
All the best for 2021
Howard




bailey.services@...
 

My Synchronome #2054 ran for 45 days before latch failed to reset. Setup is transmitter and pilot at 11.5 ohms running at nominal 3 volts and 280mA from 2 Energizer Max D batteries. Thought it might do better, how do others get on with running on a small battery pack? 

Since Christmas week clock temperature has been dropping to 1.5C degrees overnight and not much warmer in the day against previous temperature around 12C. I expected the daily loss rate would be reduced as length of pendulum reduced but loss actually increased (from -2.5 to -3.5 per day). Maybe the cast iron bob is contracting more and increasing the overall length or is something else going on?

Not much showing on the forum so thought I might post my casual observations! 
All the best for 2021
Howard