Date   

Re: Magneta and also Bowell

Simon Taylor
 

For comparison’s sake of a good design, here is an SECC type 16 from the first quarter of the 20th century.

(Look, I can have the photos where i want now, joy!)




Below is a Gillet & Johnston licensed version of the GPO clock 46 from 1934



and last is my new acquisition, most likely from the 60’s or 70’s. (Won’t know until it arrives and I can check for the date code.)


Apart from the 46 having extra facilities and no synchroniser, it is easy to see the similarities through out 50 or so years!

Simon GPO clocks


On 11 Jan 2019, at 17:59pm, James Kelly via Groups.Io <jimfortress@...> wrote:

Hi James,

Thanks for the additional information, it must have been a very interesting period with companies merging and creating transitional models before they hit on a winning design, it certainly gives us enthusiasts plenty to lookout for and talk about,

Regards

Jim


--
Simon GPO Clocks

http://www.lightstraw.co.uk/gpo/clocksystems/index.html


Re: Regulator style slave

James Kelly
 

Richard, Simon and Chris,
 
There is a file in the photos section titled Synchronome Astronomical slaves, there are a number of images in there of both dial and movemnets.

Regards

Jim


Re: Pallet design

Ian Lonsdale
 

For Jurgen and Ken,

 

File is on its way as requested

 

You should get a link to WeTransfer in your email shortly

 

Just follow the link and that will allow you to download the PDF

 

Kind regards

Ian Lonsdale

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jürgen Hoefeld
Sent: 11 January 2019 11:42
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Hi Ian,

do you think it would be possible to send this file also to me?

 

Thank you very much in advance.

 

Yours, 

Juergen 

 

Juergen Hoefeld

Aachen, Germany

 

Am Fr., 11. Jan. 2019 um 11:53 Uhr schrieb Ian Lonsdale <ian.lonsdale@...>:

John,

 

The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988

 

I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want

 

Regards

Ian Lonsdale

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John.


Re: Magneta and also Bowell

James Kelly
 

Hi James,

Thanks for the additional information, it must have been a very interesting period with companies merging and creating transitional models before they hit on a winning design, it certainly gives us enthusiasts plenty to lookout for and talk about,

Regards

Jim


Re: putting clocks on forwards or backwards

Stuart Baskill
 

When I worked for Gents and had to advance a clock system after a repair etc,I used to put the instructions book that was kept in the case down the side.This dampened out the increased swing and stopped the pendulum smashing into the case.I tied the string down.If it was an old system, or it only needed advancing a small amount,I pulled the string only on alternative swings which gave the slave movements twice as long to operate and stopped them missing pulses if they stuck a bit.It was better than adjusting 500 slave clocks individually!!  If they were hopelessly different times I used to find the most inaccessible clock and advance that to correct time and then alter the others by hand.Gent stopped bothering with clocks around 1990 when they concentrated on fire alarm systems.

On ‎Thursday‎, ‎10‎ ‎January‎ ‎2019‎ ‎22‎:‎32‎:‎16‎ ‎GMT, RICHARD ADAMEK via Groups.Io <oldenginehouse@...> wrote:


As a practical suggestion, only the Gents runs permanently so when setting it on I have a couple of bits of foam which normally lay on the floor, I stand one either side of the pendulum bob so as the swing increases they damp any excess out nicely.

It was removed from the local Tech and replaced by quarts clocks, between battery failures, cost, vandalism and theft they collected the whole lot in again and issued only for exams, staff & students own watches catering for all other timekeeping purposes, I suspect many other places did the same.

Best regs

Richard


On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 21:47:43 GMT, Geoff via Groups.Io <urjoking_uk@...> wrote:


I used to have to visit master and slave clock sites and step on or stop for an hour, clock systems. Putting back was easy, just stop them for an hour. However, stepping on an hour was not so easy. With synchronome, the pendulum starts banging the case when you set it to pulse continually. You have to stop then and on some clock systems, you had to manually step the clock on by hand. If you slightly jerked or made an irregular pulse, there would be some clocks out of step! Then you would have to get big ladders to adjust the wrong clocks! Out of interest, what do people do now with lots of quartz clocks around? I presume they have to visit EVERY clock??........The old system was easier wasn't it?


Re: Pallet design

Ken Strauss
 

I would also appreciate a copy.

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io [mailto:synchronome1@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jürgen Hoefeld
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 6:42 AM
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Hi Ian,

do you think it would be possible to send this file also to me?

 

Thank you very much in advance.

 

Yours, 

Juergen 

 

Juergen Hoefeld

Aachen, Germany

 

Am Fr., 11. Jan. 2019 um 11:53 Uhr schrieb Ian Lonsdale <ian.lonsdale@...>:

John,

 

The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988

 

I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want

 

Regards

Ian Lonsdale

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John.


Re: Pallet design

Steve Berger
 

Hi John,
I always wondered what in the world was it doing in the deserts of Arizona. Guess that’s why we keep searching.
Steve

On Jan 11, 2019, at 6:39 AM, John Hubert <jfphubert@...> wrote:

One like that (but complete) sold at Gardiner Houlgates sale on 25th October 2018 as lot 1152.



On 11 Jan 2019, at 13:35, Steve Berger <info@...> wrote:

Here's one I found at a flea market in Phoenix, Arizona with missing movement parts.
Steve 
AZ, USA

<synchronome.jpg>
On Jan 11, 2019, at 3:53 AM, Ian Lonsdale <ian.lonsdale@...> wrote:

John,
 
The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988
 
I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want
 
Regards
Ian Lonsdale
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design
 
Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John. 





Re: Pallet design

John Hubert
 

One like that (but complete) sold at Gardiner Houlgates sale on 25th October 2018 as lot 1152.



On 11 Jan 2019, at 13:35, Steve Berger <info@...> wrote:

Here's one I found at a flea market in Phoenix, Arizona with missing movement parts.
Steve 
AZ, USA

<synchronome.jpg>
On Jan 11, 2019, at 3:53 AM, Ian Lonsdale <ian.lonsdale@...> wrote:

John,
 
The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988
 
I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want
 
Regards
Ian Lonsdale
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design
 
Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John. 




Re: Pallet design

Steve Berger
 

Here's one I found at a flea market in Phoenix, Arizona with missing movement parts.
Steve 
AZ, USA


On Jan 11, 2019, at 3:53 AM, Ian Lonsdale <ian.lonsdale@...> wrote:

John,
 
The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988
 
I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want
 
Regards
Ian Lonsdale
 
From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design
 
Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John. 



Re: Pallet design

Jürgen Hoefeld
 

Hi Ian,
do you think it would be possible to send this file also to me?

Thank you very much in advance.

Yours, 
Juergen 

Juergen Hoefeld
Aachen, Germany

Am Fr., 11. Jan. 2019 um 11:53 Uhr schrieb Ian Lonsdale <ian.lonsdale@...>:

John,

 

The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988

 

I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want

 

Regards

Ian Lonsdale

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John.


Re: Pallet design

Ian Lonsdale
 

John,

 

The extract came from a series of articles published in Engineering in Miniature between Jan 1987 to May 1988

 

I can send the complete series in PDF (28mb) to you via WeTransfer.com if you want

 

Regards

Ian Lonsdale

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John.


Re: Regulator style slave

Chris
 

The Shortt pendulum slave clocks had a regulator dial.
A couple of images from film taken at Liverpool Museum many years ago.
The usual master clock construction books had drawings of the regulator movement.


Re: Regulator style slave

Simon Taylor
 

Hi Richard,

We had a Synchronome ‘observatory’ slave clock (That was my name for it). I have a video about it, so you can see if this is what you were thinking off.

Simon GPO clocks

On 11 Jan 2019, at 02:43am, RICHARD ADAMEK via Groups.Io <oldenginehouse@...> wrote:

While folk are delving among drawings, I have seen somewhere a regulator style slave somewhere, not sure if an amateur adapted a conventional movement or a manufacturers special but essentially a bar frame with three separate arbors for hour minute and second hands.

Anyone have or can point me at a drawing / plan for such a beast? as I thought it would be nice to utilise the seconds signal from my PO36/7 when I get round to refurbishing it.

A neighbour was watching me wangle out an outside facing dial the other day and we ended up having a chat about distributed time systems which he had never come across and I showed him the masters with a bunch of knackered slave dials on the bench, I was moaning about my lack of skill with a pen, turns out he works for a signwriters where no one uses a pen any more, if I make him a drawing using cad or a decent monochrome photo he can either print or vinyl cut onto a plastic sheet (like upvc barge boards) to any size or scale - sounds like a worthwhile experiment, estate agents signs seem to last almost indefinitely with no protection :)

Richard


--
Simon GPO Clocks

http://www.lightstraw.co.uk/gpo/clocksystems/index.html


Re: Magneta and also Bowell

James Nye
 

Jim,

 

At Clockworks there is a wall dedicated to Bowell, and as well as the clocks on show there are some in the store as well, from memory. One can see traces of Molden’s plans for a time distribution group in lots of these, with the names SECC and Magneta cropping up singly or in conjunction. I think we have 3 or 4 ‘transitional’ SECC/Magneta clocks. Molden bought the Greenwich Time Company in the Great War when it was confiscated owing to its German parentage (Normal-Zeit of Berlin) and then added SECC, Magneta (same reason as Greenwich Time) and then later had a temporary stake in Lowne. For a fair time one is essentially talking about the same stable, with a few different brands on the dials. Magneta emerged as the brand to retain, and this was later acquired by Booth in his BVC business. It’s hard to be certain where any of the clocks were actually made – but it was probably in Carteret St, two which one assumes any kit from the SECC Goswell Road workshops would have been taken. Probably puts the clocks in the mid 1920s?

 

In perspective, and considering the commercial angle, the pre-BVC businesses of Magneta and the others under the Molden banner were insignificant, and Gent and Synchronome would have had the bulk of the business before 1939. With BVC, TMC, TR etc, the scene shifted dramatically post-war. There were systems like those at the Bank of England or Shell Centre with over 1,000 dials. Equipment destruction policies have given us a distorted fossil record.

 

All the best!

 

James

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of James Kelly via Groups.Io
Sent: 10 January 2019 23:59
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Magneta and also Bowell

 

James and Geoff

I have attached images of a slave clock I own which is badged Magneta Silent Electric, I have always thought this was produced by Magneta London as and when they had taken over the Silent Electric company.

I also have a 1/2 second Magneta clock which has very similar design aspects to the 1/2 sec Silent electric master clock see attached image, I would like to know your thoughts on both these clocks James, I know you have an identical 1/2 second master clock as the one shown here.

ATB

Jim


Re: Pallet design

James Nye
 

Dear John,

 

You wonder about the origins of the shape of the pallet. Apologies if this is already on your shelf, but the received wisdom is generally taken to be as set out in Miles’ book. Two relevant passages:

 

“In 1906, there was a serious train accident near Salisbury, and since this was attributed to excessive speed, it became clear that a more accurate measurement of the speed of trains was needed.  By 1907, [Shortt] had designed and patented timing equipment for measuring the speed of trains by recording the time taken to travel between two fixed points.  He also devised a graphical method for improving the curves in railway lines, the other contributory factor in the accident.”

From later in the book:

 

“Hope-Jones then went on to describe how the impulse given to the pendulum should ‘begin gently, increase in value until it reached a maximum at zero and then tail off with equal gentleness’, as shown in Figure 3/35 but the shape of impulse pallet, had been empirical with no theoretical basis.  In the audience was William Hamilton Shortt and as recorded in Chapter 1.  This seems to have been their first meeting.  Shortt lost no time and submitted notes in time to be published in the ‘discussion’ at the end of the account of the meeting a couple of months later.  He first postulated that by delaying the impulse, the escapement error could be made to compensate for the circular error (i.e. the error caused by increasing the amplitude of swing of a pendulum see Chapter 2).  As an engineer, Shortt recognised that, in a cam and roller system, what matters is the path of the centre of the roller, in relation to the cam.  He then submitted an accurate graphical analysis of a revised pallet design and his optimisation of the pallet shape is shown in Figure 3/35.  By removing the curve at the top of the pallet, he caused the impulse to rise more rapidly and by curving the slope, he made the end of the impulse fall off more gently.  He derived a mathematical expression for the optimum shape of the curve but in practice this was approximated to a part of a circle.  The pallet profile was filed with a curve of 7/16  in. (11 mm), later altered slightly to 3/8 in. (9.5 mm) radius.  There is a drawback in this optimised design of pallet since if the roller remains in contact with the pallet right to the end of the curve, closure of the contacts could be uncertain.  In actual practice, the contacts are arranged to close just before the roller arrives at the flat part of the pallet curve so that they do not make contact too slowly for reliability.  Final positioning of the pallet on the pendulum was dependent on the installer and the design had to allow for this.”

Cheers

James

 

 

From: synchronome1@groups.io <synchronome1@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Haine
Sent: 10 January 2019 20:37
To: synchronome1@groups.io
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] Pallet design

 

Wow!  Thanks for all the quick replies.

Ian, noted that the ideal shape is probably not going to work any better.  Even the "ideal" shape is based on the notion that a raised-sine impulse waveform is optimum, with no real reason why.  As I have a little CNC mill I could form the shape almost as easily as the circular arc.

Peter, I think those pages are almost the same as what I have in "Electric Clocks and How to Make Them" - again the drawing lacks one dimension.

Ian, thanks for that article - very useful!  I think that is from HJ?  Could you say when it was published please?  Now that HJ is online from 1858 to 2000 I should be able to download the whole series.

Geoff, "HSN" is a newsletter published by the NAWCC, sort of the American equivalent of the BHI, it's for oddities like me who still find the physics of pendulums and things interesting.  Not a very wide circulation I fear.

Thanks again all - I'm sure I'll have many more questions.

John.


Regulator style slave

RICHARD ADAMEK
 

While folk are delving among drawings, I have seen somewhere a regulator style slave somewhere, not sure if an amateur adapted a conventional movement or a manufacturers special but essentially a bar frame with three separate arbors for hour minute and second hands.

Anyone have or can point me at a drawing / plan for such a beast? as I thought it would be nice to utilise the seconds signal from my PO36/7 when I get round to refurbishing it.

A neighbour was watching me wangle out an outside facing dial the other day and we ended up having a chat about distributed time systems which he had never come across and I showed him the masters with a bunch of knackered slave dials on the bench, I was moaning about my lack of skill with a pen, turns out he works for a signwriters where no one uses a pen any more, if I make him a drawing using cad or a decent monochrome photo he can either print or vinyl cut onto a plastic sheet (like upvc barge boards) to any size or scale - sounds like a worthwhile experiment, estate agents signs seem to last almost indefinitely with no protection :)

Richard


Re: Pallet design

RICHARD ADAMEK
 

I think Dad may have had a bit more freedom with Dictograph and running a smallholding out of hours he didn't like being sent  on distant contracts under TR but don't recall him ever saying anything against either firm, his TR boss remained a lifelong friend.

Hie you to freeview digital radio channel 704 Geoff (or whatever R4 Extra is in your area) and you can still hear many of those of the old series which have survived rebroadcast on a regular basis :)  brings back Sunday lunchtime memories for me as many were first broadcast then. Ken Horne, Goons, ISIRTA, Navy Lark etc etc.

I knew of the June Whitfield / Dictograph connection, probably from one of the early TR Journals and it always made me smile when listening to the News Huddlines over the decades.

I hope in it's new location the sandpit can be allowed a 'shallow end' for other brands or chat trapping the sort of memories other than the purely technical from such as Geoff who must represent one of the last generations who worked full time on these clock systems and for the companies in the wider sense than just synchronome.

Another list that I am active with uses the prefix O/T meaning off topic for threads not strictly withing the group title, are there enough of us and will the current upsurge in traffic persist long enough for these to be a problem to any 'purists' who may be quietly grinding their teeth ?

Richard

On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 23:02:47 GMT, Geoff via Groups.Io <urjoking_uk@...> wrote:


Telephone Rentals was an excellent company. They used a lot of TMC master clocks that were the most reliable I have seen.I do not have one at the moment. Their clock engineers carried weights about and managed to get seconds a week accuracy. They had their own design, clock units separate from the master to control bells, whistles everything the factory needed. We mentioned Dictograph earlier, the Managing Director was the father of June Whitfield  the comedienne who sadly died the other week. She went with the BBC when she was 19 and was still acting at nearly 90! I remember in the fifties as Eth in a radio comedy  "take it from here" She was engaged to a gormless character named Ron and her catchphrase was "oooh  Ronnnn!!"

On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 17:20:40 GMT-5, RICHARD ADAMEK via Groups.Io <oldenginehouse@...> wrote:





Re: Magneta and also Bowell

James Kelly
 
Edited

James and Geoff

I have attached images of a slave clock I own which is badged Magneta Silent Electric, I have always thought this was produced by Magneta London as and when they had taken over the Silent Electric company.

I also have a 1/2 second Magneta clock which has very similar design aspects to the 1/2 sec Silent electric master clock see attached image, I would like to know your thoughts on both these clocks James, I know you have an identical 1/2 second master clock as the one shown here.

ATB

Jim


Re: putting clocks on forwards or backwards

Ian Richardson
 

On the subject of advancing clocks, I also adopt the approach suggested by Richard, but with a piece of soft rag only at the left hand side of the case which I find absorbs the impact of the pendulum more calmly.

For Synchronome, I never use the installed system of pushing the gathering arm up into the path of the release catch - far too dodgy!!  I have developed a piece of bent wire which is difficult to describe, but it sits on the catch arbor and has a short piece which engages the catch below.  The vertical long end is arranged to be pushed aside (to the left) by the pendulum.  As the pendulum swings left, the catch is thus released, dropping the gravity arm on to the flat land of the impulse pallet.  The pendulum swings to the right, and the gravity arm resets as normal and the whole cycle repeats with each swing of the pendulum.  The extra friction brought about by the gravity arm roller running on the flat land of the impulse pallet prevents the arc becoming excessive.  The wire thingy is simply lifted off when the hour has been added - or nearly so, the last impulse or two being initiated manually to bring the clocks to time.

If I get round to it, I'll try to photograph this system in use.

Ian R
Macclesfield, UK


-----Original Message-----
From: RICHARD ADAMEK via Groups.Io <oldenginehouse@...>
To: synchronome1 <synchronome1@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Jan 10, 2019 11:32 pm
Subject: Re: [synchronomeelectricclock] putting clocks on forwards or backwards

As a practical suggestion, only the Gents runs permanently so when setting it on I have a couple of bits of foam which normally lay on the floor, I stand one either side of the pendulum bob so as the swing increases they damp any excess out nicely.

It was removed from the local Tech and replaced by quarts clocks, between battery failures, cost, vandalism and theft they collected the whole lot in again and issued only for exams, staff & students own watches catering for all other timekeeping purposes, I suspect many other places did the same.

Best regs

Richard


On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 21:47:43 GMT, Geoff via Groups.Io <urjoking_uk@...> wrote:


I used to have to visit master and slave clock sites and step on or stop for an hour, clock systems. Putting back was easy, just stop them for an hour. However, stepping on an hour was not so easy. With synchronome, the pendulum starts banging the case when you set it to pulse continually. You have to stop then and on some clock systems, you had to manually step the clock on by hand. If you slightly jerked or made an irregular pulse, there would be some clocks out of step! Then you would have to get big ladders to adjust the wrong clocks! Out of interest, what do people do now with lots of quartz clocks around? I presume they have to visit EVERY clock??........The old system was easier wasn't it?


Re: Magneta and also Bowell

Geoff
 

I am afraid that as a new member I started on anout other makes!! I have 2 synchronomes, a Gents master with Greenwich synchronising feature, Magneta GPO and Silent Electric Clock co.  The synchronome are the most accurate and do not  make such a loud clunk as the Gents! I think I am guilty of having a paperclip as the gadget that pulls the gear wheel round with the 30 second deeper cuts to operate the contacts.  Is it called the  Scape arm??

On Thursday, 10 January 2019, 17:43:51 GMT-5, James Nye <james@...> wrote:


Dear All,

 

I’m conscious that we have wandered away from Synchronome but I feel we are all happy playing in the same broad sandpit. I hope so. Simon has some great material on Magneta you can find through his links. It links the story to the clocks themselves, with images. I was working up material on Magneta quite a few years ago, which is still all text-based, without any clock images (!) and you can find it in the first of the links below. This is primary research, very much unfinished, unpublished, and my copyright. I am very happy to share it with everyone here, of course, but I would ask everyone to respect my copyright and the effort put in. I hope to incorporate the material in future publications.

 

On Bowell, I lectured a while back in several different places, and the simplest summary of that material finally appeared in AH in March 2016. The second link takes you to the relevant article.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/di1o0pqzkeowtke/Magneta_History%20draft%20april%202010.pdf?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/y6i8huxyxvznkab/Nye%20on%20Bowell.pdf?dl=0

 

All the best

 

James

 

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