Topics

Something to put into an AU

Eric Oppen
 

I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.

The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.  

Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.  

I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.

It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.

James Proffer
 

On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 01:15 -0500, Eric Oppen wrote:
I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.


The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.  


Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.  


I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.


It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.


Before WW II you could buy a house from the Sears & Roebuck catalog.  The boards, shingles, siding, etc. were shipped in pieces for assembly on the site.  I lived in one of those houses the first 10.75 years of my life.  IIRC 524 square feet, no plumbing, no wiring, a basic partial length flue, sitting on concrete blocks, four rooms, eight windows.

 


I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.

It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.
I think Heinlein used them in a background bit of one of his Future History stories, and mentioned them obliquely in 'Expanded Universe'.
Peter S


From: Eric Oppen <ravenclaweric@...>
To: stirling <stirling@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 4, 2017 12:15 am
Subject: [stirling] Something to put into an AU

I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.

The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.  

Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.  

I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.

It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.

markus baur
 

Buckminster Fuller's house would have been the next step after that, i presume

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dymaxion_house

servus

markus

Am 04.10.2017 um 08:15 schrieb Eric Oppen:

I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.
The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.
Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.
I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.
It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.

--
markus baur SCA: markus von brixlegg
schluesselgasse 3/5 tel: +43 - (0)1 - 50 40 662
a-1040 wien email: baur@...
austria/europe icbm: 48°11'39"N; 16°22'06"E

a portrait: http://www.abcgallery.com/A/arcimboldo/arcimboldo9.html

"der Markus?? .... das ist der mit dem Buch..."

Marvin Carlson
 


The house that I grew up in as ordered from Sears Roebuck in 1955. It was recently demolished as we sold it as part of clearing my parents' estate.  We actually got cash for it, as I was afraid that the asbestos used in the construction would wind up costing me money.  The lot was purchased to build a house for the manager of a local 1000 cow dairy.

On 10/04/2017 01:39 AM, James Proffer wrote:
On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 01:15 -0500, Eric Oppen wrote:
I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.


The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.  


Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.  


I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.


It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.


Before WW II you could buy a house from the Sears & Roebuck catalog.  The boards, shingles, siding, etc. were shipped in pieces for assembly on the site.  I lived in one of those houses the first 10.75 years of my life.  IIRC 524 square feet, no plumbing, no wiring, a basic partial length flue, sitting on concrete blocks, four rooms, eight windows.

Eric Oppen
 

Actually, Sears houses came in quite a few sizes, including some very impressive ones.

On Wed, Oct 4, 2017 at 12:17 PM, Marvin Carlson via Groups.Io <moors710@...> wrote:


The house that I grew up in as ordered from Sears Roebuck in 1955. It was recently demolished as we sold it as part of clearing my parents' estate.  We actually got cash for it, as I was afraid that the asbestos used in the construction would wind up costing me money.  The lot was purchased to build a house for the manager of a local 1000 cow dairy.
On 10/04/2017 01:39 AM, James Proffer wrote:
On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 01:15 -0500, Eric Oppen wrote:
I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.


The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.  


Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.  


I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.


It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.


Before WW II you could buy a house from the Sears & Roebuck catalog.  The boards, shingles, siding, etc. were shipped in pieces for assembly on the site.  I lived in one of those houses the first 10.75 years of my life.  IIRC 524 square feet, no plumbing, no wiring, a basic partial length flue, sitting on concrete blocks, four rooms, eight windows.

Heather Knight
 

  Sears also offered schools and churches.  One room schools were laid out very stereotypically.
    At different times, Sears has sold just about everything from layettes to gravestones.  They even sold cars for a short time.

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 4, 2017, at 1:44 PM, Eric Oppen <ravenclaweric@...> wrote:

Actually, Sears houses came in quite a few sizes, including some very impressive ones.

On Wed, Oct 4, 2017 at 12:17 PM, Marvin Carlson via Groups.Io <moors710@...> wrote:


The house that I grew up in as ordered from Sears Roebuck in 1955. It was recently demolished as we sold it as part of clearing my parents' estate.  We actually got cash for it, as I was afraid that the asbestos used in the construction would wind up costing me money.  The lot was purchased to build a house for the manager of a local 1000 cow dairy.
On 10/04/2017 01:39 AM, James Proffer wrote:
On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 01:15 -0500, Eric Oppen wrote:
I recently had surgery, and had to have my brother come in to take care of me for a few days (the doctors insisted).  While he was here, he spent most of an evening with some friends of our family's, and came back with some interesting information.


The family friends' church organist is apparently quite a well-known musician (I don't have his name offhand) who moved to my home town because he loves Lustron houses---and he found one for sale here, so he bought it sight unseen and moved to my beautiful home town.  I hope he's happy with his purchase and with my home town.  


Lustron houses were an attempt at manufacturing homes in masse after World War II, for the huge hordes of returning GIs and to deal with the long-pent-up demand for housing that had been suppressed by depression and war.  The exterior is made of panels of enameled metal.  


I had seen this house many times (it is not far from where I grew up) but hadn't known that it was one of just a few that are left.  In an AU, the Lustron Corporation might have done for housing what the Ford Model T did for cars.  In OTL, between entrenched interests and zoning laws, they didn't do well.


It might be a good throwaway detail, like the lighter-than-air craft that are so popular in AU literature.


Before WW II you could buy a house from the Sears & Roebuck catalog.  The boards, shingles, siding, etc. were shipped in pieces for assembly on the site.  I lived in one of those houses the first 10.75 years of my life.  IIRC 524 square feet, no plumbing, no wiring, a basic partial length flue, sitting on concrete blocks, four rooms, eight windows.


James Proffer
 

On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 20:50 -0400, Heather Knight via Groups.Io wrote:
  Sears also offered schools and churches.  One room schools were laid out very stereotypically.
    At different times, Sears has sold just about everything from layettes to gravestones.  They even sold cars for a short time.


And often (usually?) the same building was both school and church.  How odd we would think it today if schools had an attached grave yard.

Eric Oppen
 

Particularly if some of the graves had things on it like 

"He Didn't Listen"

"She Failed One Too Many Exams"

On Wed, Oct 4, 2017 at 7:59 PM, James Proffer <james@...> wrote:
On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 20:50 -0400, Heather Knight via Groups.Io wrote:
  Sears also offered schools and churches.  One room schools were laid out very stereotypically.
    At different times, Sears has sold just about everything from layettes to gravestones.  They even sold cars for a short time.


And often (usually?) the same building was both school and church.  How odd we would think it today if schools had an attached grave yard.

 

Eric sez:

Particularly if some of the graves had things on it like 

"He Didn't Listen"

"She Failed One Too Many Exams"
That sounds like an excellent scene from a horror movie, LOL. I can see the lightning flashes in a dark night stobiscopicly lighting up the epitaphs.

Peter S.


From: Eric Oppen <ravenclaweric@...>
To: stirling <stirling@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Oct 4, 2017 7:18 pm
Subject: Re: [stirling] Something to put into an AU

Particularly if some of the graves had things on it like 

"He Didn't Listen"

"She Failed One Too Many Exams"

On Wed, Oct 4, 2017 at 7:59 PM, James Proffer <james@...> wrote:
On Wed, 2017-10-04 at 20:50 -0400, Heather Knight via Groups.Io wrote:
  Sears also offered schools and churches.  One room schools were laid out very stereotypically.
    At different times, Sears has sold just about everything from layettes to gravestones.  They even sold cars for a short time.


And often (usually?) the same building was both school and church.  How odd we would think it today if schools had an attached grave yard.

Allen Pitt
 

And the last one you see is “don’t walk through here with a metal tipped umbrella during a thunderstorm….”

On Oct 4, 2017, at 9:20 PM, Peter Sartucci via Groups.Io <psartucci@...> wrote:

Eric sez:

Particularly if some of the graves had things on it like 

"He Didn't Listen"

"She Failed One Too Many Exams"
That sounds like an excellent scene from a horror movie, LOL. I can see the lightning flashes in a dark night stobiscopicly lighting up the epitaphs.

Peter S.

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