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Carbonated soft drinks #poll

James Proffer
 
Edited

What do you call carbonated soft drinks?

Results

See Who Responded

Margaret Carter
 

I don't call them any of those things. ("Coke" is strictly a particular brand to me.) As a child, I came across "soda" and "pop" only in dialogue in comic books. I call them "soft drinks." 

To me, "soda" meant a chocolate ice cream fizzy drink (what I've heard is oddly called an "egg cream" in New York). Loved them as a child, don't see them anywhere nowadays. During my short-lived career as a waitress in 1968, a customer asked for a "root beer soda." I explained Shoney's didn't sell sodas, only milk shakes. After some confusion, it transpired that he simply wanted a root beer.

Dialects are fun.

Margaret Carter

James Proffer
 

On Thu, 2017-09-21 at 15:31 -0400, Margaret Carter via Groups.Io wrote:
I don't call them any of those things. ("Coke" is strictly a particular brand to me.) As a child, I came across "soda" and "pop" only in dialogue in comic books. I call them "soft drinks." 


To me, "soda" meant a chocolate ice cream fizzy drink (what I've heard is oddly called an "egg cream" in New York). Loved them as a child, don't see them anywhere nowadays. During my short-lived career as a waitress in 1968, a customer asked for a "root beer soda." I explained Shoney's didn't sell sodas, only milk shakes. After some confusion, it transpired that he simply wanted a root beer.


Dialects are fun.


Margaret Carter


Yup.  Obviously I should have added two more options "Other" and "No special name."

"Egg cream?"  I'm imagining raw egg white mixed with seltzer.  Its a horrible image.

markus baur
 

limonade

servus

markus

Am 21.09.2017 um 21:43 schrieb James Proffer:

On Thu, 2017-09-21 at 15:31 -0400, Margaret Carter via Groups.Io wrote:
I don't call them any of those things. ("Coke" is strictly a particular brand to me.) As a child, I came across "soda" and "pop" only in dialogue in comic books. I call them "soft drinks."

To me, "soda" meant a chocolate ice cream fizzy drink (what I've heard is oddly called an "egg cream" in New York). Loved them as a child, don't see them anywhere nowadays. During my short-lived career as a waitress in 1968, a customer asked for a "root beer soda." I explained Shoney's didn't sell sodas, only milk shakes. After some confusion, it transpired that he simply wanted a root beer.

Dialects are fun.

Margaret Carter
Yup.  Obviously I should have added two more options "Other" and "No special name."
"Egg cream?"  I'm imagining raw egg white mixed with seltzer.  Its a horrible image.

--
markus baur SCA: markus von brixlegg
schluesselgasse 3/5 tel: +43 - (0)1 - 50 40 662
a-1040 wien email: baur@...
austria/europe icbm: 48°11'39"N; 16°22'06"E

a portrait: http://www.abcgallery.com/A/arcimboldo/arcimboldo9.html

"der Markus?? .... das ist der mit dem Buch..."

 

Raw whole eggs originally. Cream, egg, soda water, and flavor syrup during the 19th century. Eventually the cheaper version of it caught on in New York -- chocolate syrup with milk and soda. But the name stuck.
In the rest of the country the cream and egg was replaced with ice cream and it became a milkshake.  


On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 12:43 pm, James Proffer wrote:
"Egg cream?"  I'm imagining raw egg white mixed with seltzer.  Its a horrible image.

 

Your European is showing. :) Here lemonade is just lemon juice, water, and a lot of sugar. The water is not carbonated, and the lemon juice is unfiltered so the drink is cloudy with some pulp. The acidity to sweetness ratio varies, I like mine very acidic. 


On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 12:50 pm, markus baur wrote:
limonade

markus baur
 

with soda water we would call that "Soda Zitron" (and no sugar at all)

servus

markus

Am 21.09.2017 um 21:56 schrieb Andrew Gray:

Your European is showing. :) Here lemonade is just lemon juice, water, and a lot of sugar. The water is not carbonated, and the lemon juice is unfiltered so the drink is cloudy with some pulp. The acidity to sweetness ratio varies, I like mine very acidic.
On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 12:50 pm, markus baur wrote:
limonade

--
markus baur SCA: markus von brixlegg
schluesselgasse 3/5 tel: +43 - (0)1 - 50 40 662
a-1040 wien email: baur@...
austria/europe icbm: 48°11'39"N; 16°22'06"E

a portrait: http://www.abcgallery.com/A/arcimboldo/arcimboldo9.html

"der Markus?? .... das ist der mit dem Buch..."

 

We'd call it a sparkling lemonade if it was carbonated. Or Lemon soda. Calling something "sparkling" makes it sound more upscale. 
We also have seltzers, which are soda waters with flavor added, but no sweetener. And sparkling water which is overpriced carbonated water meant to be consumed as is. 
Then there's Tonic Water which is soda water with quinine and used as a drink mixer. There's also Club Soda, which is water with sodium bicarbonate in it, used as a drink mixer. 



On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 01:01 pm, markus baur wrote:
with soda water we would call that "Soda Zitron" (and no sugar at all)

James Proffer
 

On Thu, 2017-09-21 at 22:01 +0200, markus baur wrote:
with soda water we would call that "Soda Zitron" (and no sugar at all)

servus

markus

In German what are the differences between limon and zitron?

Jack Smith
 

Pop I think.  I don't really refer to them generically.  I'd say what I really wanted, for instance Vernors.

On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 4:10 PM, James Proffer <james@...> wrote:
On Thu, 2017-09-21 at 22:01 +0200, markus baur wrote:
with soda water we would call that "Soda Zitron" (and no sugar at all)

servus

markus

In German what are the differences between limon and zitron?




--
Jack Smith

English doesn't borrow from other languages -- English follows other languages down dark alleys and takes what it wants.

Margaret Carter
 

 

><Your European is showing. :) Here lemonade is just lemon juice, water, and a lot of sugar. The water is not carbonated, and the lemon juice is unfiltered so the drink is cloudy with some pulp. The acidity to sweetness ratio varies, I like mine very acidic. >

Yep. When we visited England, it took me a couple of tries ordering at pubs to get it into my head that what they call lemonade isn't lemonade at all by our definition. It's a soft drink not too dissimilar to Sprite. 

Margaret Carter

joatsimeon
 

Jan and I have always used "soda".  It seems to be general around here too.


From: Margaret Carter via Groups.Io <mlcvamp@...>
To: stirling <stirling@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Sep 21, 2017 1:31 pm
Subject: Re: [stirling] Carbonated soft drinks

I don't call them any of those things. ("Coke" is strictly a particular brand to me.) As a child, I came across "soda" and "pop" only in dialogue in comic books. I call them "soft drinks." 

To me, "soda" meant a chocolate ice cream fizzy drink (what I've heard is oddly called an "egg cream" in New York). Loved them as a child, don't see them anywhere nowadays. During my short-lived career as a waitress in 1968, a customer asked for a "root beer soda." I explained Shoney's didn't sell sodas, only milk shakes. After some confusion, it transpired that he simply wanted a root beer.

Dialects are fun.

Margaret Carter

Janet Stirling
 

I was thinking the other day that you can't get an ice cream soda anymore.  But then -soda fountains- have gone the way of the dodo.  Odd since they ruled for more than sixty years or so, now everything is coffee shops.  I call carbonated drinks soda, when I was very young, like, four,  in Massachusetts people called it tonic.  But by the time I was a pre-teen you never heard anyone say that.

Jan

Janet Stirling
joatsbuddy@...


From: Margaret Carter via Groups.Io <mlcvamp@...>
To: stirling <stirling@groups.io>
Sent: Thu, Sep 21, 2017 1:31 pm
Subject: Re: [stirling] Carbonated soft drinks

I don't call them any of those things. ("Coke" is strictly a particular brand to me.) As a child, I came across "soda" and "pop" only in dialogue in comic books. I call them "soft drinks." 

To me, "soda" meant a chocolate ice cream fizzy drink (what I've heard is oddly called an "egg cream" in New York). Loved them as a child, don't see them anywhere nowadays. During my short-lived career as a waitress in 1968, a customer asked for a "root beer soda." I explained Shoney's didn't sell sodas, only milk shakes. After some confusion, it transpired that he simply wanted a root beer.

Dialects are fun.

Margaret Carter

Tarl Neustaedter
 

On 2017-Sep-21 19:02 , Janet Stirling via Groups.Io wrote:
I was thinking the other day that you can't get an ice cream soda anymore.

I still see them periodically, usually called an ice-cream float. The popular one is vanilla ice cream in root beer. I think I saw one at Friendly's the other day. I know I saw one at Johnny Rocket's a couple of years ago.


 

Some of the ice cream shops around here sell them. They're sort of an afterthought though. 


On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 04:02 pm, Janet Stirling wrote:
I was thinking the other day that you can't get an ice cream soda anymore.  But then -soda fountains- have gone the way of the dodo.  Odd since they ruled for more than sixty years or so, now everything is coffee shops.  I call carbonated drinks soda, when I was very young, like, four,  in Massachusetts people called it tonic.  But by the time I was a pre-teen you never heard anyone say that.

Eric Oppen
 

We have an old-fashioned soda fountain still here in Iowa Falls.

And I first heard of "egg creams" when I was reading _Harriet the Spy_ back in about fifth grade.  I never could figure out what they were, and nobody I knew knew, either.  Shows how Midwestern I am.

On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 7:41 PM, Andrew Gray <aggray@...> wrote:
Some of the ice cream shops around here sell them. They're sort of an afterthought though. 

On Thu, Sep 21, 2017 at 04:02 pm, Janet Stirling wrote:
I was thinking the other day that you can't get an ice cream soda anymore.  But then -soda fountains- have gone the way of the dodo.  Odd since they ruled for more than sixty years or so, now everything is coffee shops.  I call carbonated drinks soda, when I was very young, like, four,  in Massachusetts people called it tonic.  But by the time I was a pre-teen you never heard anyone say that.

James Proffer
 

On Thu, 2017-09-21 at 12:53 -0700, Andrew Gray wrote:
Raw whole eggs originally. Cream, egg, soda water, and flavor syrup during the 19th century. Eventually the cheaper version of it caught on in New York -- chocolate syrup with milk and soda. But the name stuck.
In the rest of the country the cream and egg was replaced with ice cream and it became a milkshake.  


Have made something similar by putting banana, milk and chocolate in a blender.

markus baur
 

general austro-german usage (+):

Limone or Limette - is the smaller, green one (this one was rare in our shops until about 1990)

Zitrone - the more common, larger and yellow one

8+) Austria and Germany are two countries, divided by the same language - this can especially seen in many different words used fro food and cooking .. so it is quite possible that german german has a slightly different usage ..

Servus

markus


James Proffer <james@...> hat am 21. September 2017 um 22:10 geschrieben:

On Thu, 2017-09-21 at 22:01 +0200, markus baur wrote:
with soda water we would call that "Soda Zitron" (and no sugar at all)

servus

markus

In German what are the differences between limon and zitron?


 

James Proffer
 

On Fri, 2017-09-22 at 06:15 +0200, markus baur wrote:
general austro-german usage (+):


Limone or Limette - is the smaller, green one (this one was rare in our shops until about 1990)


Zitrone - the more common, larger and yellow one


8+) Austria and Germany are two countries, divided by the same language - this can especially seen in many different words used fro food and cooking .. so it is quite possible that german german has a slightly different usage ..



Thank you.

In the US the small green ones are limes and the larger yellow ones are lemons.  Different and distinct fruits with (to me) a different taste.

Also we have the Key lime the really small (grape sized) green ones.

To further confuse things we have the citron https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citron ,  Citron rind is candied and used as an ingredient in fruitcake.  Google tells me fruitcake is Obstkuchen in German.

Two countries divided by a common language.  I've heard that before :-)

Timothy McFadden
 

There are a number of places that specialize in serving actual fresh-squeezed lemonade, which is a whole 'nother thing from the stuff made with powdered drink mix.




From: Margaret Carter via Groups.Io <mlcvamp@...>
To: stirling@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, September 21, 2017 5:49 PM
Subject: Re: [stirling] Carbonated soft drinks

 

><Your European is showing. :) Here lemonade is just lemon juice, water, and a lot of sugar. The water is not carbonated, and the lemon juice is unfiltered so the drink is cloudy with some pulp. The acidity to sweetness ratio varies, I like mine very acidic. >

Yep. When we visited England, it took me a couple of tries ordering at pubs to get it into my head that what they call lemonade isn't lemonade at all by our definition. It's a soft drink not too dissimilar to Sprite. 

Margaret Carter


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