Graduate Student CfP for AAA 2022


Dick Powis
 

Hello,

I hope this email finds you well. My name is Betselot Wondimu, and I am a first year PhD Student in Sociomedical Sciences and Anthropology at Columbia University. 

In preparation for the upcoming 2022 AAA Annual Meeting, my peers Aarushi Shah and Tasfia Rahman are planning to submit a proposal for a panel session (in the form of an oral presentation) addressing the complexities of asymmetrical power relations and their public health implications. The session will particularly focus on complicating landscapes of knowledge production, health equity, and social justice as they relate to racialized and gendered forms of violence. A copy of the working session abstract can be seen below.

The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, April 6, and we are looking for additional student(s) to join us in submitting this proposal. I am reaching out today to see if you would be willing to share this message through your community listserv to gauge graduate students’ interest in joining our panel? Each presenter would need to submit a 250-word abstract before the April 6 deadline, which will be developed into a full paper and presented at the annual meeting on November 9-11. Please feel free to follow up with interest or questions at bbw2116@....

Thank you in advance!


 

Working Session Abstract: In the recent past, the ubiquity of various axes of structural violence are beginning to be readily acknowledged in public discourse. The study of processes and outcomes related to these forms of violence - particularly colonialism, slavery, and patriarchy - is crucial to characterizing the behavioral and structural landscapes of social inequality. Such examinations are particularly illuminating in the study of the embodiment of social inequality. This session hopes to discuss the overt and insidious means by which structural violence informs identity formation, mental health outcomes, and community-level habitus. 

 

Betselot Wondimu

PhD Student

NIMH T32 Fellow, Social Determinants of HIV

Department of Sociomedical Sciences

Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

New York, NY

bbw2116@...


--

Dick Powis, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow, College of Public Health, University of South Florida 
Chercheur postdoctoral, Faculté de santé publique, Université de Floride du Sud

Website: dickpowis.com
Twitter: @dtpowis
IG: @dickpowis
Schedule a Meeting/Planifier une réunioncalendly.com/richardpowis


Maria Lourdes Alcantara
 

Dear Dick,
 I would like to take part but I am working with indigenous health can we put inside your abstract the vulnerable people? I think it will be great. 
What do you think about it?


Maria de Lourdes Beldi de Alcantara
Prof. Medical Antroppology-USP_FM,LIN50.
Head of Support Group Group for Indigenous Youth-AJI/GAPK
Consultant of International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs

On 31 Mar 2022, at 09:14, Dick Powis <richard.powis@...> wrote:

Hello,
I hope this email finds you well. My name is Betselot Wondimu, and I am a first year PhD Student in Sociomedical Sciences and Anthropology at Columbia University. 
In preparation for the upcoming 2022 AAA Annual Meeting, my peers Aarushi Shah and Tasfia Rahman are planning to submit a proposal for a panel session (in the form of an oral presentation) addressing the complexities of asymmetrical power relations and their public health implications. The session will particularly focus on complicating landscapes of knowledge production, health equity, and social justice as they relate to racialized and gendered forms of violence. A copy of the working session abstract can be seen below.
The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, April 6, and we are looking for additional student(s) to join us in submitting this proposal. I am reaching out today to see if you would be willing to share this message through your community listserv to gauge graduate students’ interest in joining our panel? Each presenter would need to submit a 250-word abstract before the April 6 deadline, which will be developed into a full paper and presented at the annual meeting on November 9-11. Please feel free to follow up with interest or questions at bbw2116@....
Thank you in advance!

 

Working Session Abstract: In the recent past, the ubiquity of various axes of structural violence are beginning to be readily acknowledged in public discourse. The study of processes and outcomes related to these forms of violence - particularly colonialism, slavery, and patriarchy - is crucial to characterizing the behavioral and structural landscapes of social inequality. Such examinations are particularly illuminating in the study of the embodiment of social inequality. This session hopes to discuss the overt and insidious means by which structural violence informs identity formation, mental health outcomes, and community-level habitus. 

 

Betselot Wondimu
PhD Student
NIMH T32 Fellow, Social Determinants of HIV
Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health
New York, NY

--
Dick Powis, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, College of Public Health, University of South Florida 
Chercheur postdoctoral, Faculté de santé publique, Université de Floride du Sud

Website: dickpowis.com
Twitter: @dtpowis
IG: @dickpowis
Schedule a Meeting/Planifier une réunioncalendly.com/richardpowis



Dick Powis
 

Dear Maria,

I'm sorry for the confusion, I should have clarified in my email: I'm not organizing or on this panel, I'm just posting this CfP on behalf of Betselot Wondimu (bbw2116@...). You'll want to email them with questions.

Thank you so much for your time!
Best,
Dick

--

Dick Powis, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow, College of Public Health, University of South Florida 
Chercheur postdoctoral, Faculté de santé publique, Université de Floride du Sud

Website: dickpowis.com
Twitter: @dtpowis
IG: @dickpowis
Schedule a Meeting/Planifier une réunioncalendly.com/richardpowis



On Thu, Mar 31, 2022 at 12:27 PM Maria Lourdes Alcantara via groups.io <marialcantara=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Dear Dick,
 I would like to take part but I am working with indigenous health can we put inside your abstract the vulnerable people? I think it will be great. 
What do you think about it?


Maria de Lourdes Beldi de Alcantara
Prof. Medical Antroppology-USP_FM,LIN50.
Head of Support Group Group for Indigenous Youth-AJI/GAPK
Consultant of International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs
www.iwgia.org

On 31 Mar 2022, at 09:14, Dick Powis <richard.powis@...> wrote:

Hello,
I hope this email finds you well. My name is Betselot Wondimu, and I am a first year PhD Student in Sociomedical Sciences and Anthropology at Columbia University. 
In preparation for the upcoming 2022 AAA Annual Meeting, my peers Aarushi Shah and Tasfia Rahman are planning to submit a proposal for a panel session (in the form of an oral presentation) addressing the complexities of asymmetrical power relations and their public health implications. The session will particularly focus on complicating landscapes of knowledge production, health equity, and social justice as they relate to racialized and gendered forms of violence. A copy of the working session abstract can be seen below.
The deadline for submissions is Wednesday, April 6, and we are looking for additional student(s) to join us in submitting this proposal. I am reaching out today to see if you would be willing to share this message through your community listserv to gauge graduate students’ interest in joining our panel? Each presenter would need to submit a 250-word abstract before the April 6 deadline, which will be developed into a full paper and presented at the annual meeting on November 9-11. Please feel free to follow up with interest or questions at bbw2116@....
Thank you in advance!

 

Working Session Abstract: In the recent past, the ubiquity of various axes of structural violence are beginning to be readily acknowledged in public discourse. The study of processes and outcomes related to these forms of violence - particularly colonialism, slavery, and patriarchy - is crucial to characterizing the behavioral and structural landscapes of social inequality. Such examinations are particularly illuminating in the study of the embodiment of social inequality. This session hopes to discuss the overt and insidious means by which structural violence informs identity formation, mental health outcomes, and community-level habitus. 

 

Betselot Wondimu
PhD Student
NIMH T32 Fellow, Social Determinants of HIV
Department of Sociomedical Sciences
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health
New York, NY

--
Dick Powis, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, College of Public Health, University of South Florida 
Chercheur postdoctoral, Faculté de santé publique, Université de Floride du Sud

Website: dickpowis.com
Twitter: @dtpowis
IG: @dickpowis
Schedule a Meeting/Planifier une réunioncalendly.com/richardpowis