Date   

New Society for the Study of Measurement

MCCLIMANS, LEAH
 

You are cordially invited to attend a talk by Prof. Mary S. Morgan (London School of Economics) on the history and methodology of macroeconomic measurement. The talk will be held via Zoom on Thursday September 30th, 2021 from 5pm to 7pm Central European Standard Time (CEST) (4-6pm in the UK; 11am-1pm US East Coast; 8-10am US West Coast). The title and abstract of the talk are listed below.

This talk will serve as a preliminary event of a new society for the historical and philosophical study of measurement. Following the talk, the organizers will share details of this new society, and attendees will have the opportunity to join and / or volunteer to assist in its establishment.

Attendance in this event is free, but requires registration. Please follow the link below to register. Upon registration, you will receive a link via email to join the event on Zoom.

https://iec.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwrc-qhrDwuHd37usWu_P_WQG0L7w0suClk


Weights and Measuring for Complex Wholes

Mary S. Morgan, London School of Economics

Measurements of the socio-economic world as a whole are often constructed out of a set of parts, and usually rely on classification systems for those parts, which may come from theory or from observation in careful empirical work. The critical element comes in deciding how the parts are to be combined in order to create a measure of the whole. Three strategies are discussed. One relies on classification of the individual elements prior to measurement, adding up the observations by class and simply weighting them by the number in that class. A second uses a theoretical account to provide a typology of the parts and their relationships, which is then matched (via a ‘field guide’) with a taxonomy of already measured parts, all kinds of parts being in the same units and the recipe for combining coming from the theory. A third provides an array of many different indicators of the whole, each of which can provide rankings along that dimension, but they are not defined as parts in a whole, either by observation/measuring strategies or in a theoretical analysis; they lack a weighting system that could combine them in measuring the whole. Three projects, designed to measure the overall ‘well-being’ in an economy -- the Booth poverty project of the 1890s, national income accounting in the 1950s, and the sustainable development goal (SDG) numbers in the current time -- are analysed to explore these difficulties and differences.

Organizers: Luca Mari, Alessandro Giordani, Eran Tal, Nadine de Courtenay, Oliver Schlaudt, and Fabien Gregis

Leah McClimans

Associate Professor, Philosophy
Co-Director Ann Johnson Institute for Science, Technology & Society
Lead for INtegrating Values InTo Evidence-Based Medicine/Policy (INVITE) https://valuesbasedpractice.org/what-do-we-do/networks/integrating-values-into-evidence-based-medicine-invite/
she/her/hers


AAA Conference Student Travel Awards

Anika Jugovic-Spajic
 

Dear graduate and undergraduate students,

Please consider applying for the AAA Conference Student Travel Award from the Society for Medical Anthropology. Please note that since AAA conference acceptance notifications are scheduled to go out the week of September 13, the due date for the travel award has been changed to October 1, 2021. Applicants will be notified within two weeks of the due date.


Graduate Students: The SMA offers conference travel support to five SMA graduate students, who have had abstracts accepted to the annual meeting of the AAA. Winners will be recognized at the SMA Business Meeting during the AAA meeting and receive $500 to support their travel. Eligibility is restricted to student members of the SMA, who are presenting papers or posters at the AAA meeting. Applications should include the following:

  1. Proof of current SMA student membership.
  2. Copy of the conference abstract.
  3. Proof of acceptance of the abstract.
  4. Recommendation letter from an advisor (directly sent by the recommender as an email attachment to the committee chair, Jessica Mulligan).

Awards will be evaluated based on significance, innovation, and clarity of the submitted abstract, as well as the strength of the letter of support from the advisor, who should discuss the significance of the to-be-presented work. If students applying for this award co-author their poster or paper abstract with a faculty or professional anthropologist, a higher standard is expected. If students are co-authoring a poster or paper with another student, then the single award will be split between the two, should the abstract be selected.

Undergraduate Students: The SMA offers conference travel support to one undergraduate student. Winners will be recognized at the SMA Business Meeting during the AAA meeting. Eligibility is not restricted to SMA members and there is no conference presentation requirement. This award is designed for students who are facing personal or institutional challenges to funding travel to conferences.

Applications should include the following:

  1. A one-page, single-spaced personal statement.
  2. Recommendation letter from an advisor (directly submitted by the recommender as an email attachment to the committee chair,
  3. Jessica Mulligan)
  4. This letter should justify need.



All Students: Please Email the materials and any direct inquiries to the SMA Student Travel Award committee at Jessica Mulligan. The deadline for submissions is October 1. Awardees will be notified by October 15.

 


Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco Study Group Travel Awards

Breanne Casper
 

Hello,

 

The Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco Study Group is pleased to offer annual travel awards to the AAA’s (hybrid/online attendees will also be considered for travel awards). Please see the attached criteria and submission guidelines for the 2021 ADTSG Graduate Student Travel Award, Graduate Student Paper Prize, and our new Contingent Faculty Travel Award. All submission deadlines have been extended to September 10th.  

 

Please email casperb@... with any questions. 

 

 

Thank you,

 

Breanne Casper, M.A.

ADTSG Chair 

PhD Candidate 

University of South Florida 

 

 


RREAL online courses on rapid qualitative research - last places remain!

c.vindrola@...
 

Throughout Autumn, RREAL are offering nine online courses. The courses are available to book now using this link. If you are interested in attending, please book early as courses do sell out quickly. 

 

 

The Autumn Courses on offer are:

 

Introduction Courses

01 October 2021, 10:00-14:00 Introduction to rapid qualitative research FULL (waiting list available)

An introduction to the range of approaches used in rapid qualitative research including rapid appraisals, rapid ethnographic assessments (REAs), rapid qualitative inquiry (RQI), rapid evaluations and rapid ethnographies. Course participants will work with real research cases and design their own rapid study. Additional resources will also be provided at the end of the course. Delivered by Dr Cecilia Vindrola.

 08 October 2021, 10:00-14:00 Introduction to rapid evaluation FULL (waiting list available)

This course provides an introduction to a wide range of approaches used in the design and implementation of rapid qualitative evaluations. It provides an overview of rapid evaluation approaches, including rapid evaluation methods (REM), rapid feedback evaluations (RFE), rapid cycle evaluations (RCE) and rapid appraisals (RA). It also discusses the contributions and limitations of rapid evaluations, identifying instances when these approaches are suitable. Additional resources will also be provided at the end of the course. Delivered by Dr Cecilia Vindrola.

15 October 2021, 10:00-14:00 Introduction to rapid ethnography 3 places remain

This course provides an introduction to a wide range of approaches used in rapid research with a focus on rapid ethnography. The course provides an overview of rapid ethnographies conducted as a “lone researcher” or as part of a team and includes examples of quick, short-term, focused and rapid ethnographies. Additional resources will also be provided at the end of the course. Delivered by Dr Cecilia Vindrola.

 

ADVANCED COURSES

22 October 2021, 11:00 – 14:00 Team dynamics in rapid qualitative research - *New for Autumn 2021*

Many rapid qualitative research approaches rely on the use of teams of researchers to facilitate data collection and analysis. This course aims to explore the benefits and challenges of team-based rapid qualitative research as well as tools that have been developed to collect and analyse data as a team. Participants will also learn about techniques to train researchers, team-building activities and a model for team-based reflexivity developed by RREAL. Delivered by Dr Cecilia Vindrola. 

 

29 October 2021, 15:00-18:00 Big Social Data and data visualisation in rapid response and applied health research *New for autumn 2021*

Social media has risen in popularity as a source of free public data. This session will explore the potential of using social media as data in applied health research. The course includes an overview of free online tools that can be used to easily collect and visualise data from social media, including examples from recent research projects carried out during the pandemic. Participants will break into small groups to discuss possibilities for adapting or designing remote research that uses social media data. The course is delivered by Dr Sam Martin (University of Oxford).

 

05 November 2021, 14:00-17:00 Scoping studies in rapid qualitative research 3 places remain

Rapid qualitative studies often require an initial period of data collection or review of existing evidence to inform the study design and its scope. This initial period is commonly referred to as a “scoping study”. In this short course, we will briefly describe the benefits and key features of scoping studies carried out in the context of rapid research. We will discuss different types of scoping activities such as: rapid literature reviews or evidence syntheses, informal conversations with stakeholders, observations, documentary analysis and scoping workshops. We will use real world examples to demonstrate how these scoping activities can be used to inform the research questions, scope and dissemination plan of the study. We will also show examples of how we have used scoping studies to codesign rapid qualitative research with stakeholders. This course is suggested for participants with previous rapid qualitative research experience or those who have already attended our introductory courses.

 

12 November 2021 11:00-14:00 Advanced rapid qualitative data analysis FULL (waiting list available)

This course covers techniques used to rapidly analyse qualitative data. We begin with a brief overview of the iterative nature of rapid qualitative research and the analysis of data as data collection is ongoing. We also discuss strategies that are commonly used to bypass or speed up transcription and the adaptation of data analysis methods for rapid study timeframes (i.e. rapid content analysis, table-based methods, text network analysis). This course is suggested for participants with previous rapid qualitative research experience or those who have already attended our introductory courses.

 

19 November 2021 11:00-14:00 Process/pathway mapping in rapid qualitative research 4 places remain

This course introduces participants to an approach for process/pathway mapping that we have tailored to the time and funding constraints of rapid qualitative research. This approach combines collaborative team meetings with rapid data collection and analysis (mainly in the form of interviews and observations) to map processes used in organisations or the stages involved in clinical pathways. We will use examples from our own research to describe each step of the mapping process. Participants will also have time to reflect on how to adapt this approach to their own studies. This course is suggested for participants with previous rapid qualitative research experience or those who have already attended our introductory courses.

 

01 December 2021, 10:00 – 14:00 Rapid qualitative research during humanitarian emergencies - *New for Autumn 2021*

This course aims to provide attendees with the skills required to implement rapid qualitative research approaches in the context of health emergencies managed within the humanitarian system. Participants will learn to apply and adapt rapid qualitative methods through deeper understanding of the global UN/INGO system for managing emergencies, critical appraisal of the collection and use of findings to inform response operations, and contemporary case studies. Use of personal topics of interest is encouraged. Preparatory reading is required. Delivered by Dr Ginger A. Johnson.

 

For additional information on the courses, including course objectives and content outline, please email Sarah Hayden (s.hayden@...) or visit the RREAL website: https://www.rapidresearchandevaluation.com/


New book "Treating Heroin Addiction in Norway: The Pharmaceutical Other"

Aleksandra Bartoszko
 

Dear friends and colleagues,

 

I am pleased to announce publication of my book “Treating Heroin Addiction in Norway: The Pharmaceutical Other” with a foreword by Todd Meyers (Routledge Studies of Health and Medical Anthropology, 2021).

 

*** Book description***

 

Focusing on the world of Norwegian Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) in the aftermath of significant reforms, this book casts a critical light on the intersections between medicine and law, and the ideologies infusing the notions of "individual choice" and "patient involvement" in the field of addiction globally.

With ethnographic attention to the encounters between patients, clinicians, and bureaucrats, the volume shows that OST sustains the realities it is meant to address. The chapters follow one particular patient through complex clinical and legal battles as they fight to achieve a better quality of life. The study provides ethnographic insight that captures the individual, experiential aspects of addiction treatment, and how these experiences find a register within different domains of treatment and policy, including the familial, social, legal, and clinical.

Offering a rare view of addiction treatment in a Scandinavian welfare state, this book will be of interest to scholars of medical and legal anthropology and sociology, and others with an interest in drug policy and addiction treatment.

 

More information: https://www.routledge.com/Treating-Heroin-Addiction-in-Norway-The-Pharmaceutical-Other/Bartoszko/p/book/9780367655549

(code CDC21 for 30% discount)

 

Best wishes,

Aleksandra Bartoszko


Call for papers--Emerging Scholars Program Fall 2021 at Boston University, extended deadline #cfp

Kimberly Arkin
 

Department of Anthropology

Boston University

 

Call for Applications

An Emerging Scholars Program on:

 

Addressing Systemic Racism in Health and Medicine

Fall 2021

 

DEADLINE EXTENDED

 

 

In the fall of 2021, the Boston University Department of Anthropology, with the support of the Wheelock School for Education’s Education for Equity and Democracy program and the BU Medical School’s master’s program in Medical Anthropology and Cross Cultural Practice, will host an emerging scholars program dedicated to scholarship on systemic racism in health and medicine.

 

COVID-19 has highlighted the way health and health outcomes are inextricably tied to race in the United States.  The disease has had a hugely disproportionate impact on communities of color for so very many reasons, some of them clearly related to the ways that racial discrimination and injustice are built into both biomedicine and health care delivery systems.  From attention to the deadly consequences of pulse oximeters that are sometimes wildly inaccurate on darker skin, to wrestling with the deep skepticism about the safety and efficaciousness of vaccines developed by a medical-industrial complex that long neglected and harmed indigenous people and people of color, this has been an unprecedented moment of reckoning around the subtle and egregious ways that both race and racial health disparities are produced by contemporary medical practice.  We would therefore like to take the unfortunate opportunity that Covid-19 has created to highlight some of the cutting-edge scholarship around these issues.  What are the overt and more insidious ways that systemic racism impacts medical science, clinical systems, and patient care either inside or outside the United States?  What are scientists, social scientists, doctors, or patients starting to do about it?  What are promising avenues for change? 

 

We invite applications from early career post-docs and ABDs who will be completing their PhDs in Anthropology (or a related field) by June 2023.  We are interested in scholars who are affiliated with populations with an embodied stake in this research and who belong to communities that traditionally have been underrepresented in the academy, notably African American, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander and Latine communities. 

 

The program has three major components.  In late September and October, our emerging scholars will have the opportunity (via Zoom) to present aspects of their research and join the discussion in one of two departmental medical anthropology courses.  In mid-November, we will bring the whole group of scholars together for an in-person public-facing round table chaired by Professor Dána-Ain Davis, renowned feminist and medical anthropologist from Queens College and The Graduate Center CUNY.  The roundtable is designed to publicize scholars’ research within the BU and wider Boston academic communities.  Scholars will make short 15-minute presentations that outline the major questions of their research.  These will be followed by panel discussion and questions from the floor.  And finally, a closed workshop will be held for the scholars themselves.  In this workshop, scholars’ pre-circulated works-in-progress will be discussed with Professor Davis, Professor Natali Valdez, a feminist science and technology studies scholar in Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley, and senior BU faculty from across the university (School of Medicine, School of Public Health, Sociology, Anthropology, and Biology) whose research is relevant to the papers being discussed.  Additional details about the format and logistics for the program are available upon request.

 

Invited junior scholars will be guests of the Department of Anthropology from November 12th-13th 2021.   All travel expenses will be covered by Boston University.

NB: We are closely monitoring the public health situation and are prepared, if necessary, to move to an entirely virtual program. 

 

To be considered for this emerging scholars’ program, please submit:

·      A 1-2 page cover letter that describes your career trajectory, your wider research interests, and the connection between the themes of this conference and your current research.

·      A short project abstract (no more than 250 words) explaining the work you would like to present at the conference.

·      A diversity statement (no more than 500 words) that explains the forms of intellectual and embodied diversity that you would bring to the program. 

·      A current CV.

 

Materials should be submitted to Veronica Little (vclittle@...) by August 31, 2021. Participants will be notified of acceptance in early September 2021.  Questions may be addressed to Dr. Kimberly Arkin (karkin@...).

 

  

 


Seeking new Co-Chair for CAM/IM SIG

Laura Meek
 

Dear colleagues and friends,


The Complementary and Alternative Medicine / Integrative Medicine (CAM/IM) Special Interest Group of the Society for Medical Anthropology is seeking a new co-chair to come onboard after the November AAA meeting. Current co-chair Jane Saffitz will stay on and be able to help train my replacement after I (Laura Meek) step down. 

 

This position is open to anthropologists from all sub-fields, including practicing and applied, as well as early career scholars (including ABD PhD students). The role requires very little work most months, but with more responsibilities around the time of the AAA meeting. Major duties include:

 

  • Holding the CAM/IM SIG Business Meeting during the AAA
  • Participating in occasional meetings with the SMA Executive Board and/or other SIGs
  • Preparing a short Annual Report on SIG membership, activities, and budget
  • Co-chairing the CAM/IM graduate student paper prize committee
  • Sharing announcements and information via the CAM/IM listserv, Facebook page, and website 
  • And any other initiatives you and the membership would like to develop!

 

Potential candidates should send a paragraph expressing their interest to current co-chairs Laura Meek (lameek@...) and Jane Saffitz (saffitzj@...) by October 15

 

Please also feel free to reach out to us with any questions about the position. Since coming on as co-chair (when I was a PhD candidate), I have found it to be a great way to get more involved in SMA, to meet colleagues and learn about their work, and to gain valuable leadership experience. I would be happy to chat with anyone who is interested in the position!

 

For SIG members, we will set up an online poll for voting on the incoming co-chair the week before the AAA meeting. We then hope to announce the election results during the CAM/IM Business Meeting, to be held via Zoom on Thursday, November 4th at 8pm EST.


Best wishes,

Laura



Laura A. Meek, PhD (she/they) 
Assistant Professor
Centre for the Humanities and Medicine
906 Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus
The University of Hong Kong
e: lameek@...  |  t: (852) 3917 7937

Series Co-Editor, Contested Truths over COVID-19 in Africa, Somatosphere


Re: Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

Charles Briggs
 

Dear Kathy,
Thanks for writing and sending the new syllabus.
Some reason, an archive of syllabi that had been on the SMA website in the past was removed a number of years ago. I thus endeavored to find that archive and include it, even as we put out a call for new syllabi. Very pleased to have your updated version.
Best,
Charles


On 7/21/21, 3:53 PM, Kathryn Oths wrote:

Charles~

The syllabus you have listed for me is 20 years out of date! 

I’m attaching the one I used this past spring as a replacement.  It’s listed in both your undergrad and grad lists.

 

Thanks,

Kathy

 

 

 

Kathryn Oths

Professor Emeritus

Department of Anthropology
The University of Alabama
Box 870210
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
Phone 205-348-5947
koths@... | http://koths.people.ua.edu

 

The
                University of Alabama

 

 

 

From: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io <society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ayo Wahlberg
Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2021 10:54 AM
To: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [society-for-medical-anthropology] Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

 

On behalf of SMA President Charles Briggs

=====================================

 

In order to support medical anthropologists and the study of medical anthropology globally, the Society for Medical Anthropology asked instructors to make their syllabi available to students, faculty wishing to design or redesign their own courses, and anyone seeking information about the field. We are very pleased to announce that 45 undergraduate syllabi and 15 graduate course syllabi are now available in the Resources section of the SMA website.

 

In keeping with SMA's priorities, we hope to expand the Archives by offering syllabi that focus on decolonizing and anti-racist perspectives,  that come from schools located outside the United States, that are taught in languages other than English, and that address the practice of medical anthropology. We believe that the Course Syllabi Archives will form an important resource, and we invite instructors to contribute their syllabi by sending them to smaassistant2021@....

 

In closing I would like to thank all of the instructors who so generously shared their syllabi.

 

With all best wishes,

Charles

 

Charles L. Briggs

SMA President

 

 




FW: [EXTERNAL] Re: [society-for-medical-anthropology] Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

Kathryn Oths
 

Dear Ayo~

I have been a dues paying member of SMA for over 30 years.

koths@... may be the alternate email I’m listed under.

 

Thanks,

Kathy

 

 

 

From: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io <society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io> On Behalf Of Kathryn Oths
Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2021 5:54 PM
To: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [society-for-medical-anthropology] Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

 

Charles~

The syllabus you have listed for me is 20 years out of date! 

I’m attaching the one I used this past spring as a replacement.  It’s listed in both your undergrad and grad lists.

 

Thanks,

Kathy

 

 

 

Kathryn Oths

Professor Emeritus

Department of Anthropology
The University of Alabama
Box 870210
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
Phone 205-348-5947
koths@... | http://koths.people.ua.edu

 

The University of Alabama

 

 

 

From: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io <society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ayo Wahlberg
Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2021 10:54 AM
To: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [society-for-medical-anthropology] Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

 

On behalf of SMA President Charles Briggs

=====================================

 

In order to support medical anthropologists and the study of medical anthropology globally, the Society for Medical Anthropology asked instructors to make their syllabi available to students, faculty wishing to design or redesign their own courses, and anyone seeking information about the field. We are very pleased to announce that 45 undergraduate syllabi and 15 graduate course syllabi are now available in the Resources section of the SMA website.

 

In keeping with SMA's priorities, we hope to expand the Archives by offering syllabi that focus on decolonizing and anti-racist perspectives,  that come from schools located outside the United States, that are taught in languages other than English, and that address the practice of medical anthropology. We believe that the Course Syllabi Archives will form an important resource, and we invite instructors to contribute their syllabi by sending them to smaassistant2021@....

 

In closing I would like to thank all of the instructors who so generously shared their syllabi.

 

With all best wishes,

Charles

 

Charles L. Briggs

SMA President

 

 


Re: Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

Kathryn Oths
 

Charles~

The syllabus you have listed for me is 20 years out of date! 

I’m attaching the one I used this past spring as a replacement.  It’s listed in both your undergrad and grad lists.

 

Thanks,

Kathy

 

 

 

Kathryn Oths

Professor Emeritus

Department of Anthropology
The University of Alabama
Box 870210
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487
Phone 205-348-5947
koths@... | http://koths.people.ua.edu

 

The University of Alabama

 

 

 

From: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io <society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ayo Wahlberg
Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2021 10:54 AM
To: society-for-medical-anthropology@groups.io
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [society-for-medical-anthropology] Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

 

On behalf of SMA President Charles Briggs

=====================================

 

In order to support medical anthropologists and the study of medical anthropology globally, the Society for Medical Anthropology asked instructors to make their syllabi available to students, faculty wishing to design or redesign their own courses, and anyone seeking information about the field. We are very pleased to announce that 45 undergraduate syllabi and 15 graduate course syllabi are now available in the Resources section of the SMA website.

 

In keeping with SMA's priorities, we hope to expand the Archives by offering syllabi that focus on decolonizing and anti-racist perspectives,  that come from schools located outside the United States, that are taught in languages other than English, and that address the practice of medical anthropology. We believe that the Course Syllabi Archives will form an important resource, and we invite instructors to contribute their syllabi by sending them to smaassistant2021@....

 

In closing I would like to thank all of the instructors who so generously shared their syllabi.

 

With all best wishes,

Charles

 

Charles L. Briggs

SMA President

 

 


2021 AIDS and Anthropology Research Group (AARG) Paper Prizes (Call for Papers) - DEADLINE JULY 30, 2021 (REMINDER)

Corliss Heath
 

REMINDER

The AIDS and Anthropology Research Group (AARG), an interest group of the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA), which is a sub-section of the American Anthropological Association, seeks submissions for three prestigious paper prizes:

AARG Clark Taylor Professional Paper Prize, for a paper authored by one or more professionals. 
Clark Taylor conducted research on sexuality and men who have sex with men. He was one of the first anthropologists to become actively involved in safer sex interventions and involving anthropology in HIV/AIDS programs;
 
 AARG Graduate Student Prize, for a paper authored by one or more graduate students; and
 
AARG Ray Bucko, SJ Undergraduate Student Prize, for a paper authored by one or more undergraduate students.
 
Papers are evaluated according to the following criteria:
  • Contributions to the anthropological literature on HIV/AIDS or to the analysis of HIV/AIDS policy
  • Direct impact on HIV prevention and/or treatment
  •  Originality of argument and/or data analysis
  •  Approach to the relevance of cultural, ethnic, race, gender, and/or sexual orientation issues
  • Justified use of methods (when applicable)
  • Theoretical approach (when applicable)
  • Attention to previous research
  • Presentation–grammar, style, etc.
  • Suitability for submission to peer reviewed journals or other professional publications (including newsletters, monographs, etc.)
Limitations and submission rules:
  • Papers may be under review at the time of submission.
  • If a paper submission is already a published paper, it cannot have been published more than one year before the paper prize submission deadline.
  • All author(s) who submit to the graduate student prize must be enrolled as a graduate student at the time of submission.
  •  Authors who submit to the undergraduate student prize must have not graduated more than one year ago.
  • While all papers are judged in terms of the same criteria, judges will exercise reasonable judgment in separately assessing undergraduate student, graduate student and professional level submissions. In other words, undergraduate student submissions will not be judged against graduate student or professional submissions, and so forth. The goal of these criteria is to support the development of the highest quality submissions at all levels, while fairly judging each level of submission in terms of reasonable standards for years of experience in the field.
  • Members of the AARG Steering Committee and previous winners of the awards are not be eligible for consideration.

The recipients of the awards will be selected by the AARG Paper Prize Committee, respectively. The awards consist of a $100 honorarium, and the recipient’s will be announced in Anthropology News, at the AARG business meeting, and at the presentation ceremony for the SMA during the business meeting of the 2021 Annual American Anthropological Association meeting in Baltimore this November. If there is a tie and we decide to award more than two paper prizes for a category then each prize recipient will receive $50.00. 

 

Submissions for the 2021 competition should be sent to Corliss D. Heath corliss_h@... by July 30, 2021 11:59 p.m. EST.

Questions about submissions may be directed to Corliss Heath at corliss_h@... 


"If you want something that you have never had before, you have to do something that you have never done before."


Corliss D. Heath, PhD, MPH, M.Div

Scholar, Teacher, Preacher


Medical Anthropology Course Syllabi Archives now available

Ayo Wahlberg
 

On behalf of SMA President Charles Briggs

=====================================

 

In order to support medical anthropologists and the study of medical anthropology globally, the Society for Medical Anthropology asked instructors to make their syllabi available to students, faculty wishing to design or redesign their own courses, and anyone seeking information about the field. We are very pleased to announce that 45 undergraduate syllabi and 15 graduate course syllabi are now available in the Resources section of the SMA website.

 

In keeping with SMA's priorities, we hope to expand the Archives by offering syllabi that focus on decolonizing and anti-racist perspectives,  that come from schools located outside the United States, that are taught in languages other than English, and that address the practice of medical anthropology. We believe that the Course Syllabi Archives will form an important resource, and we invite instructors to contribute their syllabi by sending them to smaassistant2021@....

 

In closing I would like to thank all of the instructors who so generously shared their syllabi.

 

With all best wishes,

Charles

 

Charles L. Briggs

SMA President

 

 


Announcing new SMA leaders and requesting contributions to the September issue of Second Opinion

Anika Jugovic-Spajic
 

Dear all,

 

Please find below a message from the SMA President, Charles Briggs:

 

 

Dear SMA member,

 

I hope that you are well.

 

First, I am pleased to announce that at the close of the November (virtual) Business Meeting, Steven Black will become the SMA Treasurer and Chelsey Carter, Michelle Munyikwa, and Adeola Oni-Orisan will be joining the Executive Board. Please join me in thanking them for their willingness to lend their time and talents to the Society during the coming three years.

 

Second, if you had a chance to take a look at the last issue of Second Opinion, I hope that you noticed that we have moved to two newsletters a year, featuring substantive discussions of issues that, we hope, will interest you. We are now looking ahead to the September issue. SMA Digital Communications Manager Anika Jugović Spajić will be sending out a request down the road for briefer announcements, but I would like to invite you now to think about submitting an essay of 1500-2000 words. We are looking in particular for contributions to the three new series that we inaugurated in that issue: Medical Anthropologists Confront Racism, The Practice of Medical Anthropology, and Global Medical Anthropologies.

 

If you would like to send in a contribution or suggest an idea, please contact either SMA Communication Committee Chair Ayo Wahlberg or yours truly. I might add that we will be highlighting contributions to these three series in new sections of the SMA website, giving them greater visibility and a longer virtual life.

 

In closing, I thank you for being a part of SMA during these difficult days, even as we are doing our best to support you.

 

With best wishes,

 

Charles

 

Charles L. Briggs

President

Society for Medical Anthropology

 


looking for films about ritual--can you help?

Robbie Davis-Floyd
 

Dear Medical Anthropology Colleagues,

 

I have just finished Ritual: What It Is, How It Works, and Why, to be published by Berghahn. Now I need to gather a list of films illustrating multiple kinds of rituals to include in the book.

 

Can you help me? If so, please send me the names of any good films about ritual that you know of, along with how to find them.

 

Would deeply appreciate!

 

Sending best wishes to all,

Robbie

 

Robbie Davis-Floyd PhD (she/her/hers)

Adjunct Professor, Dept. of Anthropology, Rice University

Fellow, Society for Applied Anthropology

Senior Advisor to the Council on Anthropology and Reproduction

Board Member, International MotherBaby Childbirth Organization

Lead Editor, Routledge Book Series Social Science Perspectives on Childbirth and Reproduction

Co-Editor, Berghahn Series on The Anthropology of Obstetrics and Obstetricians

www.davis-floyd.com

 


FW: TORs - Regional Coordinator Anthropological and Intersectional Approaches - COVID -19 Vaccines' project

Arachu Castro
 

FYI – I received this from PAHO. They are looking for an anthropologist. Please note that I’m not involved in the search and that you should direct any questions to PAHO directly.

 


Book Release: Dying to Count

Siri Suh
 

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I am thrilled to announce the publication of my book, Dying to Count: Post-Abortion Care and Global Reproductive Health Politics in Senegal by the Rutgers University Press Series on Health, Inequality, and Social Justice. 

During the early 1990s, global health experts developed a new model of emergency obstetric care: post-abortion care or PAC. In developing countries with restrictive abortion laws and where NGOs relied on US family planning aid, PAC offered an apolitical approach to addressing the consequences of unsafe abortion. In Dying to Count, Siri Suh traces how national and global population politics collide in Senegal as health workers, health officials, and NGO workers strive to demonstrate PAC’s effectiveness in the absence of rigorous statistical evidence that the intervention reduces maternal mortality. Suh argues that pragmatically assembled PAC data convey commitments to maternal mortality reduction goals while obscuring the frequency of unsafe abortion and the inadequate care women with complications are likely to receive if they manage to reach a hospital. At a moment when African women face the highest risk worldwide of death from complications related to pregnancy, birth, or abortion, Suh’s ethnography of PAC in Senegal makes a critical contribution to studies of global health, population and development, African studies, and reproductive justice.

"In this fascinating account, Siri Suh describes how tools, policies, institutions, and data come together in Senegal to make post-abortion care into 'good care.' PAC suits policy-makers' needs for targets, funders' demands for metrics, and clinicians' interests in misclassifying abortions. With devastating analytical and moral clarity, Suh shows that there’s almost nothing PAC cannot do—except put women's dignity and interests first."  Claire Wendland, author of A Heart for the Work: Journeys through an African Medical School

"This is a magnificent book. Feminist scholar Siri Suh has written an exquisitely detailed and meticulously researched account of the introduction and use of post-abortion care in Senegal during the late 20th and early 21st century. By taking a clearheaded and compassionate look at maternal health and abortion politics in Senegal, Suh draws attention to the fact that as long as there are restrictive abortion laws women need PAC, no matter where they are living. What a superb addition to global health scholarship!"  Susan Bell, author of DES Daughters: Embodied Knowledge and the Transformation of Women’s Health Politics

Rutgers University Press is offering a 30% discount with code RFLR19.

--
Siri Suh, PhD, MPH
Assistant Professor
Department of Sociology
Brandeis University



Webinar on Patchwork Ethnography - June 24-25, 2021

Saiba Varma
 

Dear all,
We are excited to invite you to an upcoming webinar on "Patchwork Ethnography" to be held on June 24-25th, 2021, free and open to anyone!

Patchwork ethnography seeks to bring blackboxed and delegitimized ethnographic practices out of the closet. Working against the masculinist and ableist assumptions that undergird fieldwork, patchwork ethnography recognizes that researchers — particularly women, BIPOC, queer, trans, and disabed folx — have always constructed their ethnographic work through patchwork, whether due to personal obligations, issues of accessibility, or the neoliberal, precarious academic labor market. In this virtual conference, we seek to understand patchwork ethnography as the product of what feminist anthropologists have described as “intersecting responsibilities” in relation to the structural constraints of racism, sexism, and classism that researchers are entangled in and which shape our choices.  

Patchwork ethnography acknowledges the multiple subject positions, positionalities, and complexities of researchers. Rather than imagining the researcher as a sovereign subject, patchwork ethnography allows us to think honestly about the vulnerabilities of researchers, and how we may produce anthropological knowledge that pushes against demands of mastery and control. The goal of this two-day conference is to generate a collective conversation about patchwork ethnography as theory, method, and/or as an advocacy tool for funding agencies.


This webinar is part of the Webinars on the Future of Anthropological Research initiative, supported by the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research.


Program Committee: Gökçe Günel, Saiba Varma, Chika Watanabe, Alexia Arani and Katie Ulrich.


For the program schedule, please see here: https://www.patchworkethnography.com/work/webinar

Register here to receive the conference zoom link



Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Affiliate Faculty in the Global Health Program, Science Studies, Ethnic Studies and Critical Gender Studies
Winter/Spring 2021 office hours sign up here.



Reminder: Graduate Student Paper Prize in the Anthropology of CAM/IM

Laura Meek
 

Dear all,

This is a reminder about our SIG's upcoming graduate student paper prize. We look forward to reading your submissions!

************

Graduate Student Paper Prize in the Anthropology of CAM/IM
 
Deadline: July 1, 2021
 
The Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) and Integrative Medicine (IM) special interest group of the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA) invites submissions of graduate student authored papers in the anthropology of “alternative” medicines. Papers should relate to the study of modes of healing that are either non-biomedical or marginalized within conventional medicine. The award committee prefers work that engages interest group members’ core concerns with questions of power, culture, and epistemology.
 
The CAM/IM special interest group was organized in 2006 to encourage the anthropological study of CAM and IM as emergent socio-medical phenomena with global ramifications in the 21st century. Members recognize CAM/IM as inclusive of current examples of medical pluralism, as influenced by processes of globalization and hybridization, scientization and commodification.
 
The author of the winning paper will receive a cash award of $200, and their name will be announced in Anthropology News and at the SMA business meeting at the American Anthropological Association meeting in November. Qualifying submissions will be judged by a committee of CAM/IM members. Submissions from all sub-disciplines are encouraged.
 
QUALIFYING CRITERIA
·  Primary or first author must be a graduate student at time of submission
·  Preferably based on original fieldwork and data, but can be theoretical
·  Must have been written in the past 24 months
·  May be unpublished or submitted for publication at the time of submission
·  Maximum of 8,000 words, not including references

JUDGEMENT CRITERIA
·  Relevance to the CAM/IM SIG statement of purpose (above)
·  Originality of fieldwork and data
·  Richness of substantive or evidentiary materials
·  Clarity of anthropological methods
·  Effective use of theory and/or data
·  Organization, quality of writing, and coherence of argument

SUBMISSION PROCESS
·  Do not include your name or any identifying information in the paper itself
·  Provide a separate cover sheet that includes your name, mailing address, email address, and affiliation
·  Papers must be double-spaced and in PDF format (please include page numbers)
·  References should be formatted in the American Anthropological Association style
·  Email copies to Laura Meek at lameek@... and Jane Saffitz at saffitzj@...
·  Submissions must be received by 11:59 PM EST, July 1, 2021 for full consideration

Please feel free to reach out to us with any questions.

All the best,
Laura Meek & Jane Saffitz, CAM/IM SIG Co-Chairs



Laura A. Meek, PhD (she/they) 
Assistant Professor
Centre for the Humanities and Medicine
906 Run Run Shaw Tower, Centennial Campus
The University of Hong Kong
e: lameek@...  |  t: (852) 3917 7937

Series Co-Editor, Contested Truths over COVID-19 in Africa, Somatosphere


Statement of the Executive Board of the SMA on Effects of Israel’s Bombing on Palestinian Health and Health Infrastructures

Anika Jugovic-Spajic
 

Dear all,

 

The Executive Board of the Society for Medical Anthropology voted to adopt the statement that appears below. We believe that, as medical anthropologists, it is important for us to address how the recent Israeli bombing campaign targeted medical facilities and health professionals, thereby intensifying the already deleterious health impacts of occupation, blockade, land expropriation, past bombing campaigns, shortages of food and medicine, and massive inequities in the availability of health care and specifically COVID-19 vaccines in Israel and the Occupied Territories. We likewise wished to express our support for urgent actions needed to rebuild health infrastructures and services.

 

 

We would like to make the process clear. A draft statement was written by two Executive Board members. It was then discussed by other EB members and others who participate in (but do not vote on) SMA leadership issues; the statement was modified as a result. The EB vote was unanimous. The statement thus expresses the views of the voting members of the Executive Board, but does not claim to represent those of all SMA members or of the American Anthropological Association as a whole.

 

 

Statement of the Executive Board of the Society for Medical Anthropology on Effects of Israel's Bombing on Palestinian Health and Health Infrastructures

 

The Executive Board of the Society for Medical Anthropology unequivocally condemns the Israeli military's targeting of Palestinian civilians, medical facilities, and critical infrastructure supporting health care in the occupied Palestinian territory of Gaza. The recent Israeli attack on Gaza left behind a death toll around 250, including nearly 70 children, and 1,900 injured. The United Nations has reported that over 72,000 Palestinians were forcibly displaced in the Gaza strip. Israeli airstrikes have targeted six hospitals and nine primary health care centers, including an MSF clinic, a desalination plant that provided clean water to 250,000 residents, and Gaza's only covid-19 testing laboratory. Two prominent Palestinian doctors, Ayman Abu al-Ouf, head of internal medicine and the covid-19 response team at al-Shifa hospital, and neurologist Mooein Ahmad al-Aloul were killed in the Israeli bombardment.

 

 

We see these abhorrent actions as an extension of Israel's long-standing settler colonial military occupation of Palestine, which left the Gaza Strip as one of the poorest and most densely populated areas in the world. Most of the Palestinians in Gaza are refugees. Since 2007, Gaza has been under Israeli military blockade, which places severe economic and movement restrictions, allowing only the entry of basic humanitarian products and rendering this part of the occupied Palestinian territory dependent on international aid. Gaza has the world's highest unemployment rate, and more than half of its population lives below the poverty line. In the past, the Israeli state used metrics of caloric intake to restrict the quantity of food allowed into Gaza. Although this policy is no longer in official use, most Gaza residents still cannot meet their daily caloric requirements due to the economic effects of the blockade. Over the last thirteen years, four major Israeli military incursions have devastated Gaza's critical infrastructure, including medical facilities. The vast majority of the population has no access to clean water, reliable electricity or a proper sewage system. The negative impacts of war, poverty, and environmental degradation on Gaza residents', especially children's, physical and mental health have been widely documented. The current ceasefire, as important as it is, does not address these historically accumulated health consequences of colonial dispossession, war, and occupation.

 

As medical anthropologists, we are especially concerned that these conditions are now also intensifying the impacts of a deadly pandemic. As the COVID-19 pandemic is highlighting once again the fatal effects of racialized health inequities, the unconscionable global disparities in the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines become starkly visible in Israel/Palestine.  While Israel has been lauded for vaccinating the majority of its citizens, including those living in unlawful settlements in the West Bank, the Israeli government provides almost no vaccines for the Palestinians living in the Occupied Territories, contravening international law that prescribes that the occupying power must ensure public health standards for the population living under occupation. Given colonialism, occupation, and blockade induced overcrowding, forced displacement, and infrastructural problems in Palestine, the acute shortage of vaccines will have long-term effects on the viability of Palestinian health services.

 

 

The SMA Executive Board expresses its solidarity with health workers in the Occupied Territories and Palestinians' struggle for justice, including in health. In keeping with international laws protecting and promoting human rights to health, the following actions are urgently needed:

 

  • The lifting of the blockade on the Gaza Strip
  • An international investigation of attacks on civilians, civilian infrastructure, and medical facilities as potential war crimes
  • International support for the urgent restoration of damaged critical healthcare infrastructure and for vaccination efforts in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

 

Executive Board of the Society for Medical Anthropology


2021 AIDS and Anthropology Research Group (AARG) Paper Prizes (Call for Papers) - DEADLINE JULY 30, 2021

Corliss Heath
 

The AIDS and Anthropology Research Group (AARG), an interest group of the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA), which is a sub-section of the American Anthropological Association, seeks submissions for three prestigious paper prizes:


AARG Clark Taylor Professional Paper Prize, for a paper authored by one or more professionals. 
Clark Taylor conducted research on sexuality and men who have sex with men. He was one of the first anthropologists to become actively involved in safer sex interventions and involving anthropology in HIV/AIDS programs;
 
 AARG Graduate Student Prize, for a paper authored by one or more graduate students; and
 
AARG Ray Bucko, SJ Undergraduate Student Prize, for a paper authored by one or more undergraduate students.
 
Papers are evaluated according to the following criteria:
  • Contributions to the anthropological literature on HIV/AIDS or to the analysis of HIV/AIDS policy
  • Direct impact on HIV prevention and/or treatment
  •  Originality of argument and/or data analysis
  •  Approach to the relevance of cultural, ethnic, race, gender, and/or sexual orientation issues
  • Justified use of methods (when applicable)
  • Theoretical approach (when applicable)
  • Attention to previous research
  • Presentation–grammar, style, etc.
  • Suitability for submission to peer reviewed journals or other professional publications (including newsletters, monographs, etc.)
Limitations and submission rules:
  • Papers may be under review at the time of submission.
  • If a paper submission is already a published paper, it cannot have been published more than one year before the paper prize submission deadline.
  • All author(s) who submit to the graduate student prize must be enrolled as a graduate student at the time of submission.
  •  Authors who submit to the undergraduate student prize must have not graduated more than one year ago.
  • While all papers are judged in terms of the same criteria, judges will exercise reasonable judgment in separately assessing undergraduate student, graduate student and professional level submissions. In other words, undergraduate student submissions will not be judged against graduate student or professional submissions, and so forth. The goal of these criteria is to support the development of the highest quality submissions at all levels, while fairly judging each level of submission in terms of reasonable standards for years of experience in the field.
  • Members of the AARG Steering Committee and previous winners of the awards are not be eligible for consideration.

The recipients of the awards will be selected by the AARG Paper Prize Committee, respectively. The awards consist of a $100 honorarium, and the recipient’s will be announced in Anthropology News, at the AARG business meeting, and at the presentation ceremony for the SMA during the business meeting of the 2021 Annual American Anthropological Association meeting in Baltimore this November. If there is a tie and we decide to award more than two paper prizes for a category then each prize recipient will receive $50.00. 

 

Submissions for the 2021 competition should be sent to Corliss D. Heath corliss_h@... by July 30, 2021 11:59 p.m. EST.

Questions about submissions may be directed to Corliss Heath at corliss_h@... 

 

 



"If you want something that you have never had before, you have to do something that you have never done before."


Corliss D. Heath, PhD, MPH, M.Div

Scholar, Teacher, Preacher

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