Deer Canyon AG Morning Migrant Flight


Kaaren Perry
 

Oops!  Cedar Waxwings are definitely considered seasonal migrants. Sorry for the typo.  Hate it when that happens!


Kaaren 



On Apr 28, 2021, at 7:15 PM, Kaaren Perry <surfbird1@...> wrote:

Chiming in on Brad's inspiring and engaging report!

3 Western Tanagers dropped into our yard in Morro Bay around 1:00 this afternoon. 1 adult male and 2 apparent adult females.  Really looking forward to tomorrow morning as I plan to be out and about birding in Morro Bay.

At Del Mar Park there was one male Western Tanager male this morning along with many (15!?) Wilson's Warblers, 1 Yellow Warbler, calling Bullocks and a Pacific-slope pair.  About 35+ Cedar Waxwings were moving about high in the trees near the foot bridge, passing food and bathing in the creek.  While the CEWA are not migrants  it is still lovely  to see them still around.  They will be thinning out in late May, gone in late June and returning in small numbers in Sept., becoming abundant again in Nov. 


On Apr 28, 2021, at 6:17 PM, Brad Schram <gonebrdn@...> wrote:

The spring here at Deer Canyon, Arroyo Grande has thus far been very, very slow. 
S-L-O-W.  Apart from swallows and a mini-blizzard of VAUX'S SWIFTS on the 26th, the last couple weeks of fog and/or low clouds with heavy ocean haze/onshore influence have produced very, very few western migrants here.  Did I mention it has been slow?

Early morning flights are typically best between about 6:30 and 8AM, but although yesterday morning's sunshine and clear weather was encouraging but it was perfectly still in the early morning hours.  This meant that any migrants still in the air were not hugging the terrain for shelter from headwinds as they moved northward.

I awoke this morning (Wed) to another clear morning accompanied by a slight NE breeze.  Given the conditions and the late April date these conditions predicted at least a light visible morning migrant flight. 

Numbers were certainly not high, and migrants moving northward over the canyon were only occasional appearances--but at least there were migrants visible.  I suspect that anyone birding riparian canyons this morning would have had decent migrant numbers.  I was on the terrace by 6:25, birding consistently with bins and 'scope until 8am.

One pair of (aging) eyes does not cover 180 degrees of view highly efficiently, but the species and numbers below give a decent sample of today's morning flight.  Only fly-by migrants are listed, I didn't attempt to ID distant swallows in flocks: 
GREAT EGRET 5
; VAUX’S SWIFT 4; WESTERN KINGBIRD 3; TREE SWALLOW 2; CLIFF SWALLOW 6; BARN SWALLOW 4; unidentified swallow 60; BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER 1; HERMIT WARBLER 1; TOWNSEND’S WARBLER 2; warbler (sp.) 15; WESTERN TANAGER 3; GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW 4 (lingering); BULLOCK’S ORIOLE 2.  Unidentified distant passerine 45.

Tomorrow morning's stronger predicted breeze from the NE coupled with clear conditions looks like it could be a better morning flight.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande














Kaaren Perry
 

Chiming in on Brad's inspiring and engaging report!

3 Western Tanagers dropped into our yard in Morro Bay around 1:00 this afternoon. 1 adult male and 2 apparent adult females.  Really looking forward to tomorrow morning as I plan to be out and about birding in Morro Bay.

At Del Mar Park there was one male Western Tanager male this morning along with many (15!?) Wilson's Warblers, 1 Yellow Warbler, calling Bullocks and a Pacific-slope pair.  About 35+ Cedar Waxwings were moving about high in the trees near the foot bridge, passing food and bathing in the creek.  While the CEWA are not migrants  it is still lovely  to see them still around.  They will be thinning out in late May, gone in late June and returning in small numbers in Sept., becoming abundant again in Nov. 

On Apr 28, 2021, at 6:17 PM, Brad Schram <gonebrdn@...> wrote:

The spring here at Deer Canyon, Arroyo Grande has thus far been very, very slow. 
S-L-O-W.  Apart from swallows and a mini-blizzard of VAUX'S SWIFTS on the 26th, the last couple weeks of fog and/or low clouds with heavy ocean haze/onshore influence have produced very, very few western migrants here.  Did I mention it has been slow?

Early morning flights are typically best between about 6:30 and 8AM, but although yesterday morning's sunshine and clear weather was encouraging but it was perfectly still in the early morning hours.  This meant that any migrants still in the air were not hugging the terrain for shelter from headwinds as they moved northward.

I awoke this morning (Wed) to another clear morning accompanied by a slight NE breeze.  Given the conditions and the late April date these conditions predicted at least a light visible morning migrant flight. 

Numbers were certainly not high, and migrants moving northward over the canyon were only occasional appearances--but at least there were migrants visible.  I suspect that anyone birding riparian canyons this morning would have had decent migrant numbers.  I was on the terrace by 6:25, birding consistently with bins and 'scope until 8am.

One pair of (aging) eyes does not cover 180 degrees of view highly efficiently, but the species and numbers below give a decent sample of today's morning flight.  Only fly-by migrants are listed, I didn't attempt to ID distant swallows in flocks: 
GREAT EGRET 5
; VAUX’S SWIFT 4; WESTERN KINGBIRD 3; TREE SWALLOW 2; CLIFF SWALLOW 6; BARN SWALLOW 4; unidentified swallow 60; BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER 1; HERMIT WARBLER 1; TOWNSEND’S WARBLER 2; warbler (sp.) 15; WESTERN TANAGER 3; GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW 4 (lingering); BULLOCK’S ORIOLE 2.  Unidentified distant passerine 45.

Tomorrow morning's stronger predicted breeze from the NE coupled with clear conditions looks like it could be a better morning flight.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande













Brad Schram
 

The spring here at Deer Canyon, Arroyo Grande has thus far been very, very slow. 
S-L-O-W.  Apart from swallows and a mini-blizzard of VAUX'S SWIFTS on the 26th, the last couple weeks of fog and/or low clouds with heavy ocean haze/onshore influence have produced very, very few western migrants here.  Did I mention it has been slow?

Early morning flights are typically best between about 6:30 and 8AM, but although yesterday morning's sunshine and clear weather was encouraging but it was perfectly still in the early morning hours.  This meant that any migrants still in the air were not hugging the terrain for shelter from headwinds as they moved northward.

I awoke this morning (Wed) to another clear morning accompanied by a slight NE breeze.  Given the conditions and the late April date these conditions predicted at least a light visible morning migrant flight. 

Numbers were certainly not high, and migrants moving northward over the canyon were only occasional appearances--but at least there were migrants visible.  I suspect that anyone birding riparian canyons this morning would have had decent migrant numbers.  I was on the terrace by 6:25, birding consistently with bins and 'scope until 8am.

One pair of (aging) eyes does not cover 180 degrees of view highly efficiently, but the species and numbers below give a decent sample of today's morning flight.  Only fly-by migrants are listed, I didn't attempt to ID distant swallows in flocks: 
GREAT EGRET 5
; VAUX’S SWIFT 4; WESTERN KINGBIRD 3; TREE SWALLOW 2; CLIFF SWALLOW 6; BARN SWALLOW 4; unidentified swallow 60; BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER 1; HERMIT WARBLER 1; TOWNSEND’S WARBLER 2; warbler (sp.) 15; WESTERN TANAGER 3; GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW 4 (lingering); BULLOCK’S ORIOLE 2.  Unidentified distant passerine 45.

Tomorrow morning's stronger predicted breeze from the NE coupled with clear conditions looks like it could be a better morning flight.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande