Date   

Los Osos American Redstart

Jim Royer
 

I just had a chipping immature male American Redstart along Nancy, between Binscarth and Garden in Los Osos. He is working the willows along Nancy. Chip is similar to Yellow Warbler.

Jim Royer
Los Osos


Help with Black Phoebe nest?

Rubba Johanna
 

Hi, this is rather strange and I hope the site admin doesn't mind. 

A pair of black phoebes have made a nest at a friend’s house. They have successfully raised one clutch, and now have a second set of 2 chicks. Today I checked the nest and there was an adult’s tail sticking out of it, not moving. Two babies were there, peeping and begging. I came back over an hour later, and the tail was still there. I touched it lightly with a long stick, and it didn't move. I think there is a dead adult in the nest. The other phoebe continues to feed the chicks, but I don’t know if it can deliver enough food. And I don’t know if the dead bird will make it hard for the babies to continue in the nest.

 

I called Pacific Wildlife. They’re closed today, and I don’t know if they’ll be open tomorrow. I left a message and hope they’ll call. Can anybody recommend a course of action? Or do we just let nature take its course?

Johanna Rubba

Grover Beach

 


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Vaux's Swift (2 reports)
- Red-eyed Vireo (2 reports)
- Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (1)
- Reported Jul 02, 2020 07:02 by Graham Lederer
- Atascadero Lake, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4646547,-120.6667256&ll=35.4646547,-120.6667256
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71070015
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "In flight south side of lake"

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (1)
- Reported Jul 02, 2020 07:02 by Pair of Wing-Nuts
- Atascadero Lake, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4646547,-120.6667256&ll=35.4646547,-120.6667256
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71070617
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "In flight south side of lake"

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Jul 03, 2020 10:15 by Liam Hampl
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71098420
- Comments: "Continuing bird first reported by Jim Royer. Heard, not seen. Very uncooperative. Heard for around 3 minutes then went silent."

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Jul 02, 2020 12:40 by Eric Wier
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71065603
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "Continuing bird first detected at this location by Jim Royer. We heard the bird sing several times and made a recording, but did not see the bird before it went quiet. We were unable to re-find the bird."

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (Setophaga coronata auduboni) (1)
- Reported Jul 03, 2020 15:11 by Jay Carroll
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71102600
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Called once; photos."

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


FW: [CALBIRDS] true summer status of Ring-billed Gull along CA coast?

Tom Edell
 

I've always felt that especially in summer immature California Gulls are misidentified as Ring-billed Gulls, so I think that Paul Lehman's post is one worth reading. In SLO County, Ring-billed Gulls are found on sandy beaches in the South County and from Morro Bay (sandspit and estuary) to Cayucos. This species is unexpected along the rocky north coast where one or maybe two occasionally summer on sandy beaches at creek mouths such as Santa Rosa, San Simeon, and Arroyo Laguna. If you think you see more than a couple, look again. It happens, but very rarely in mid-summer. And don't identify young Ring-billed Gulls solely by a dark tipped bill! For eBirders, consider brief comments/photos for summer sightings and when unsure of the species enter gull sp. or Larus sp.

And like Paul, I'd be interested to hear what the maximum counts are that other people can find. Thanks...Tom

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: CALBIRDS@groups.io <CALBIRDS@groups.io> On Behalf Of lehman.paul@... via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 3, 2020 9:52 AM
To: calbirds@groups.io
Subject: [CALBIRDS] true summer status of Ring-billed Gull along CA coast?

A coastal, alternate-adult Ring-billed Gull photographed here in San Diego County yesterday (July 2nd) by Sue Smith reminded me of the good question raised by a number of folks over the past decade or so: What the true status of late-spring and early-summer Ring-billed Gulls is along the coast of California, between mid-May and mid-July? Certainly the first returning adults and juveniles start appearing around mid- (third week of) July. But true over-summering birds appear to be actually quite rare along the immediate coast for almost the entire length of the state. Can one find the occasional single bird, or perhaps a group of 2 or 3, sure! But very, very few. A couple favored sites might have up to 6 or 7. And a couple of the very large estuaries in the state may have more than that--places like the more interior sections of the San Francsico Bay complex and also perhaps locally up at Humboldt Bay. But what of many such reports from open beaches, mudflats, and rocky shores? The species in the past has been reported fairly regularly in such plces between mid-May and mid-July, and there are even some published reports of moderate numbers during this period. Multiple counts of 20-35 birds, with no details, along the outer coasts from several counties can still be found in the eBird data. But, Ring-billed Gull is actually quite rare at that season along almost the entire immediate coast--particularly any count over just one or several birds--and many such reports almost certainly involve young California Gulls (showing strongly bicolored bills), which are fairly numerous in those areas through the summer. Many of the RBGU reports have involved visiting out-of-state birders who do not appreciate the true summer status of these two gull species, and often they come from popular "birder tourist" destinations such as Monterey. But summering Ring-billeds are actually very rare along the immediate coast of Monterey, at least south of Moss Landing. Just one example.

So, if anyone is looking for a quick early-summer project, go to as many of your outer-coastal gull hang-outs as you can in the next 10 days or two weeks--before the southbound Ring-billeds and Californias start arriving--and see how many Ring-billeds you can actually find. And then also try some lakes and park ponds inland on the coastal plain. I have yet to find ANY Ring-billeds in San Diego County this summer, although I haven't checked some interior lakes which could well support a couple.
I'd be interested to hear what the maximum counts are that other people can find (away from San Francisco and Humboldt Bays). Anything over 5-7 birds, if that?

--Paul Lehman, San Diego








--
Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA


Gull

Bob Chapman
 

Several years back a white wagtail showed up at Pismo Lagoon. I worked the entire day and never heard a word from my coworker who found it!

Yesterday a coworker tells me, "oh yeah, I meant to tell you, the other day (Tuesday) I saw a black headed gull on the shore." Ug, coworkers.

From her description; Franklin's or Laughing.

Bob Chapman
Oceano Dunes


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Long-tailed Duck (1 report)
- Red-breasted Merganser (1 report)
- Vaux's Swift (2 reports)
- Red-eyed Vireo (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1)
- Reported Jul 01, 2020 12:28 by Jim Royer
- Morro Rock, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3693972,-120.8670566&ll=35.3693972,-120.8670566
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71038113
- Comments: "Continuing female at north end of spit"

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (1)
- Reported Jul 01, 2020 12:28 by Jim Royer
- Morro Rock, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3693972,-120.8670566&ll=35.3693972,-120.8670566
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71038113
- Comments: "Female"

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (2)
- Reported Jul 02, 2020 07:13 by Dane Fagundes
- Atascadero Lake, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4646547,-120.6667256&ll=35.4646547,-120.6667256
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71050683
- Comments: "Brown swift flying with swallows with shallow wing beats."

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (1)
- Reported Jul 01, 2020 06:12 by Pair of Wing-Nuts
- de Anza Trail - South Atascadero, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4874054,-120.6409125&ll=35.4874054,-120.6409125
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71039705

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Jul 02, 2020 08:24 by Jim Royer
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71050371
- Comments: "Continuing singing bird"

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 01, 2020 08:00 by Rick Saval
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71036612
- Comments: "Singing infrequent and I would go to that location. Always 3-4 meters up in dense clump of leaves. Gray crown, pale white eyeline with black border. Dark green upperparts, pale white underparts. Took photos, useless, obscured by leaves."

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


pelagic - Morro Bay

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Hello all,

   I hope you are keeping safe and healthy, and happy 4th of July coming up! I wanted to fill you in on the possibility of a pelagic this season out of Morro Bay Landing. I am trying to finalize the date but I am working on Sept 26 as the date. It may change. Before finally committing to a date with the captain, I would like to gauge interest, and let you know about the covid-19 procedures. Party fishing boats have been going out for weeks now, and operating under these new norms, so by September they will be very well versed on the details. The main change is that trips will go out with only about half the normal number of people, so well reduced capacity. Crew and folks on board will wear masks, this is particularly important if you go inside the cabin. The idea will be to attempt as much as possible to social distance while onboard, and this worked well on a recent fishing trip I went on. We all want to feel safe, and make others feel safe. Key areas and parts of the boat will be disinfected/cleaned multiple times by crew, door handles etc. There will be sanitizer available to use throughout the trip. Fortunately most people are outside while on pelagics, and with a minimum 10 knot breeze (from the boat movement alone) means that boating is as far as we know a reasonably low risk activity. Hopefully by late September we will be in a much better state overall.

    The negative is that pricing has to temporarily increase to $230 per person given reduced numbers. The good part is that there are reduced number of people, and therefore more elbow room. If you are keen on the trip, do let me know via a personal email and I can see if we can pull this off this year. I was originally (pre covid) going to try to do two boat trips out of Morro Bay this year but I think I will need to keep it to one this time around. I always enjoy the Morro Bay trip, and look forward to it.

    Ocean productivity has been high this year, and some interesting and unusual birds have started to show up (Cook’s Petrels in San Diego, Least Storm-Petrel on the Farallon Islands). We have been seeing lots of early shearwater activity up here in Half Moon Bay, and albatross close to shore. All could change, but right now it looks like a lively ocean out there in terms of food and abundance. Both krill and anchovy are present in good numbers.

   Let me know – alvaro@...

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 


Swainson’s Thrush

 

Probable Swainson’s Thrush, heard singing at Biddle Park.

Susan Crawford 
SLO

--
Dreamzville.com (Home of Dreamzville Radio), San Luis Obispo.


Red-eyed Vireo

Jim Royer
 

The Red-eyed Vireo is singing toward the back of Pecho Willows this morning. It is moving around a bit, but if you are patient and quiet you will hopefully hear it and see it. Watch for poison oak and ticks. 

I also found a pair of glasses on the ground there if anyone lost them. Let me know if they’re yours.

Jim Royer
805-748-7895


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Black Turnstone (1 report)
- Red-eyed Vireo (1 report)
- Indigo Bunting (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Black Turnstone (Arenaria melanocephala) (1)
- Reported Jun 30, 2020 12:10 by Petra Clayton
- Cal Poly Pier, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1770149,-120.7413109&ll=35.1770149,-120.7413109
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71009419
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Click on the image below for a Flickr video, showing the Black Turnstone foraging:
<a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/jack-petra-clayton/50064611372/in/dateposted-public/" title="Black Turnstone (Arenaria melanocephala), Avila Beach, CA"><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/31337/50064611372_5130e33101_b.jpg" alt="Black Turnstone (Arenaria melanocephala), Avila Beach, CA" /></a>"

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Jun 30, 2020 12:17 by Jim Royer
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71009102
- Comments: "I found this large vireo feeding within the vegetation from below eye level to about 10’ up in the trees, mostly staying obscured. This bird had a dark eyeline which extended to the bill, a whitish supercilium, and a dark cap. It had dull olive upper parts and no conspicuous wingbars. It had unmarked off-white underparts. It had a large vireo bill and a head shape with a pulled-out look, like some one had pulled on the bill stretching out its head creating a flat crowned look and a stretched out looked to the front of the head next to the bill. I did not see the eye color. Jay Carroll later refound this bird. It had a soft liquid whistled song, that was infrequently given."

Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) (1)
- Reported Jul 01, 2020 15:00 by Norman Pillsbury
- Indigo Bunting Stakeout--Quintana Road, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3625791,-120.8167097&ll=35.3625791,-120.8167097
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71030471
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing."

***********

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Long-tailed Duck (3 reports)
- Red-eyed Vireo (1 report)
- Summer Tanager (1 report)
- Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 29, 2020 08:55 by Tom Edell
- Morro Rock, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3693972,-120.8670566&ll=35.3693972,-120.8670566
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70973738
- Comments: "Poor look at the continuing female at north end of sandspit. Small size, white below, dark above, bill tucked under wing"

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 29, 2020 07:04 by Carol Comeau
- Morro Rock, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3693972,-120.8670566&ll=35.3693972,-120.8670566
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70972924
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "The immature female that wintered at the harbor mouth was at the north end of the Morro Bay sandspit. She was grooming on beach."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jun 29, 2020 07:04 by Anonymous eBirder
- Morro Rock, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3693972,-120.8670566&ll=35.3693972,-120.8670566
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70991312
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "The immature female that wintered at the harbor mouth was at the north end of the Morro Bay sandspit. She was grooming on beach."

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Jun 30, 2020 13:59 by Jay Carroll
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70998190
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "Reported earlier by Jim Royer; the bird was singing (recorded), and very briefly seen in the willow undergrowth; face with dark eyeline bordered above with a white supercilium, dark cap, dull reddish-brown eye, stout vireo bill; did not get a good look at upperparts but did not see any wing bars; no photos."

Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) (1)
- Reported Jun 30, 2020 08:00 by sue girard
- a cory yard list, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.0424457,-120.5001819&ll=35.0424457,-120.5001819
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70998823
- Comments: "1st spring male with splotchy but clearly defined red head and chest and 'dirty brass' underparts. have seen twice in the past week with good looks in full sun while resting in shrub after bath. very large heavy bill, knobby head."

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) (1)
- Reported Jun 29, 2020 09:45 by Petra Clayton
- Islay Creek Campground--Montana de Oro SP, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2736118,-120.8838502&ll=35.2736118,-120.8838502
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70969053
- Comments: "Brief, but clear frontal view of a male: Black head, pinkish-red breast, white belly.--- Seen in riparian area below the "amphitheater.""

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Mexican Duck added to AOU Checklist

Tom Edell
 

Sixty-first Supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list

of North American Birds

The latest supplement to the AOU now lists Mexican Duck as a full species. This adds the species to the county list (and Morro Bay CBC list) based on an adult male photographed by Curtis Marantz in downtown SLO along San Luis Obispo Creek on 15 Dec 2018 and is the reason for mentioning the county in the account below.  If it happened once, it can happen again, but it should be considered a very rare vagrant to our area and any claims of one should be documented with good photos. There are lots of hybrid Mallards in the county!

 

See:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S50741449

https://www.aba.org/mexican-duck/

 

Tom Edell

Cayucos, CA

 

 

Sixty-first Supplement to the American Ornithological Society’s Check-list of North American Birds

Volume 137, 2020, pp. 1–24

 

Anas diazi Ridgway. Mexican Duck.

 

Anas diazi Ridgway, 1886, Auk 3: 332. (San Ysidro, Puebla, Mexico.)

 

     Habitat.—Freshwater Marshes (0–2500 m).

     Distribution.—Breeds from southeastern Arizona, southern New Mexico, and west-central Texas south in the highlands of Mexico to Jalisco, Michoacán, México, Distrito Federal, Tlaxcala, and Puebla.

     Winters in the breeding range and east to southern Coahuila, San Luis Potosí, and eastern Tamaulipas.

     Nonbreeding birds occur casually throughout the year north through much of Colorado and in Utah north to Great Salt Lake, west to the Lower Colorado River Valley, and east to the Lower Rio Grande Valley. Accidental west to San Luis Obispo County, California, north to Albany County, Wyoming, and east to southwestern Nebraska. Difficulties distinguishing this species from A.  fulvigula may be decreasing detection east of its usual range.

     Notes.—Formerly (e.g., AOU 1983,  1998)  considered conspecific with A.  platyrhynchos, although prior to this (until  AOU 1973) the 2 were treated as separate species. Newly separated based on assortative mating in the narrow contact zone between these species (Bellrose 1976, Hubbard 1977, Brown 1985) and genomic data that indicate restricted gene flow between them (Lavretsky et al. 2015, 2019a).

 

Anas diazi is treated as a species separate

 


--

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA


Pac Slope Flycatcher nest = success

Sue Girard
 
Edited

Nest built above front entry door on the door frame molding back in May. First clutch of three eggs was abandoned (neighbor's heavy equipment commotion all day?) Second attempt has been successful--at least three noggins/ tails showing today. Female hangs around covered entry all day, hunting. I'm using the garage door for the duration. They've been on my property for 25 springs, from their calls and rare sightings. This is the first year they've been very visible and confiding. Also seeing daily Hooded Oriole pair, splotchy 1st spring Summer Tanager and Western Tanager males and  Black-headed Grosbeaks though their favorite Prunus hedge is weeks from ripening berries. 

Sue Girard
Nipomo CA

*edit: after a day of furious feedings on the 3rd, , the female flycatcher dissappeared. Over the 4th, there was very little bird activity of any kind in the yard. (??) on the 5th, I ventured a look into the nest using a rigged mirror, and the nest was empty. I have since seen a single individual using the bird bath, but not occupying the female's habitual roosts. Could a larger bird (one of a dozen yard Jays?) robbed the nest? The outside of the nest is covered in fecal sacs.


Pecho Red-eyed Vireo

Jim Royer
 

A singing Red-eyed Vireo was just seen and heard in Pecho Willows, located near the intersection of Pecho Road and Henrietta in Los Osos. The main dirt trail meanders through the trees west. Near the the back of the wooded area it turns left toward the golf course. It was seen and heard on both sides of the trail to the left. 

Jim Royer
Los Osos


Dozer, the Long-billed Curlew, on Facebook

petra schaaf
 

The Intermountain Bird Observatory in Idaho just updated their Facebook page to add Dozer's recent stop-over at Morro Strand State Beach. (Unfortunately I have not seen Dozer again or Neil, the other banded Long-billed Curlew male from Idaho.)

Heather Hayes, one of the research biologists, encourages those who are interested to join in on keeping up with the flock through their Facebook page as a "Like" and a "Share" has helped them spread the awareness of the curlew decline far and wide!! 

Petra Clayton,
Los Osos, CA


P.S.
Facebook text:

🛰 BREAKING NEWS! 🛰

Can you guess what coastal Morro Bay, CA and Idaho’s West Central Mountains have in common? Two of the Curlew Crew’s newest members to the study flock- curlews Neil (LV) from New Meadows and Dozer (MV) from Indian Valley, that's what!!

If you recall from our post last week, these 2 males began their southbound migration a bit early, as males usually stick around ‘til mid-June to early July. The satellite transmitter data indicated that Neil was near Modesto, CA and Dozer was outside of Reno, NV. Within a few short days, the next transmissions from both birds were pinging from the Morro Bay area. This is extremely exciting as these are the very first curlews from any of our breeding research study sites to migrate directly to Coastal California to overwinter 😲!

So why is this new research discovery so important? Because as we piece the migratory connectivity puzzle together, we can work toward ensuring conservation measures are in place to protect the habitats and resources curlews need along their migratory routes throughout their entire annual life cycle.

A big, BIG thank you to our partner Payette Children's Forest whose funding made this research possible in the West Central Mountains👍

Enjoy this fantastic video that was sent to us from an amatuer birder visiting Morro Bay just days after Dozer's arrival! She captured him doing what his namesake implies, as he nestles into the sand for a snooze~ doesn't that sound good right about now?!




[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Vaux's Swift (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (3)
- Reported Jun 29, 2020 13:30 by Kilian Hampl
- Meadow Creek/Monarch Butterfly Preserve, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1298771,-120.6328654&ll=35.1298771,-120.6328654
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70963747
- Media: 9 Photos
- Comments: "Mixed in with the Cliff Swallows. Photos."

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (3)
- Reported Jun 29, 2020 13:30 by Liam Hampl
- Meadow Creek/Monarch Butterfly Preserve, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1298771,-120.6328654&ll=35.1298771,-120.6328654
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70963535
- Media: 9 Photos
- Comments: "Mixed in with the Cliff Swallows. Photos."

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Re: Unusual Hooded Oriole behavior

Tom Ogren
 

Pineapple guava trees are great bird trees. I always grow them & love eating the guavas. For years I've seen orioles, mockingbirds, jays, and starlings eating their petals. 
We don't have a native pollinator for these fruits and the birds, shaking the flower as they yank off the sweet petals...the birds pollinate the flowers and get them to set fruit.

Tom Ogren SLO

-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Bush
Sent: Jun 28, 2020 6:38 PM
To: Judy Neuhauser
Cc: SLOBIRD CALIF
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Unusual Hooded Oriole behavior

Hi Judy and All -

The white petals on pineapple guava or feijoa (now in the genus Acca) are very sugary and tasty! Wonderful 'raw' in a salad, actually. Recently I have observed European Starlings taking petals in Los Osos.

It doesn't surprise me that other birds might take these energy-rich petals, the odd thing to me is the Hooded Oriole learning to DIP them in your grape jelly offering! What a TREAT!

Acca sellowiana  Pineapple Guava


Mike Bush
Los Osos, California



On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 4:46 PM Judy Neuhauser <judyneu@...> wrote:
I watched my jelly feeder this morning. A male Hooded Oriole flew into the Feijoa tree (also known as Pineapple guava), pulled white petals off the flowers, flew to the jelly feeder, dipped the white petals into the grape jelly twice, then flew off toward his (presumable nest) with white petals tipped in purple jelly. He's been doing this for the past few days. No photos ... yet.

Judy Neuhauser
Los Osos


Re: Unusual Hooded Oriole behavior

Laura Kass
 

My petals are devoured by Mockingbirds and Scrub jays every year.


On Jun 28, 2020, at 6:40 PM, Mike Bush <mbushii@...> wrote:


Hi Judy and All -

The white petals on pineapple guava or feijoa (now in the genus Acca) are very sugary and tasty! Wonderful 'raw' in a salad, actually. Recently I have observed European Starlings taking petals in Los Osos.

It doesn't surprise me that other birds might take these energy-rich petals, the odd thing to me is the Hooded Oriole learning to DIP them in your grape jelly offering! What a TREAT!

Acca sellowiana  Pineapple Guava
<20140501_080117.jpg>


Mike Bush
Los Osos, California



On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 4:46 PM Judy Neuhauser <judyneu@...> wrote:
I watched my jelly feeder this morning. A male Hooded Oriole flew into the Feijoa tree (also known as Pineapple guava), pulled white petals off the flowers, flew to the jelly feeder, dipped the white petals into the grape jelly twice, then flew off toward his (presumable nest) with white petals tipped in purple jelly. He's been doing this for the past few days. No photos ... yet.

Judy Neuhauser
Los Osos


Re: Unusual Hooded Oriole behavior

Mike Bush
 

Hi Judy and All -

The white petals on pineapple guava or feijoa (now in the genus Acca) are very sugary and tasty! Wonderful 'raw' in a salad, actually. Recently I have observed European Starlings taking petals in Los Osos.

It doesn't surprise me that other birds might take these energy-rich petals, the odd thing to me is the Hooded Oriole learning to DIP them in your grape jelly offering! What a TREAT!

Acca sellowiana  Pineapple Guava
20140501_080117.jpg

Mike Bush
Los Osos, California



On Sun, Jun 28, 2020 at 4:46 PM Judy Neuhauser <judyneu@...> wrote:
I watched my jelly feeder this morning. A male Hooded Oriole flew into the Feijoa tree (also known as Pineapple guava), pulled white petals off the flowers, flew to the jelly feeder, dipped the white petals into the grape jelly twice, then flew off toward his (presumable nest) with white petals tipped in purple jelly. He's been doing this for the past few days. No photos ... yet.

Judy Neuhauser
Los Osos


Unusual Hooded Oriole behavior

Judy Neuhauser
 

I watched my jelly feeder this morning. A male Hooded Oriole flew into the Feijoa tree (also known as Pineapple guava), pulled white petals off the flowers, flew to the jelly feeder, dipped the white petals into the grape jelly twice, then flew off toward his (presumable nest) with white petals tipped in purple jelly. He's been doing this for the past few days. No photos ... yet.

Judy Neuhauser
Los Osos