Date   

Merlin at MB Marina

Ron Ruppert <rruppert@...>
 

Two merlin, in combat display were seen over the eucalyptus at the Morro Bay
marina across from the golf course at 3pm on 2/8/00. They flew off in
opposite directions.
Ron Ruppert
rruppert@bass.cuesta.cc.ca.us


Morro Bay Field Trip Results

Mike Stiles
 

I received this and thought I'd pass it along.
Mike Stiles

A group from Santa Cruz County led by Clay Kempf found the following
interesting (well interesting to me!) birds in and around Morro Bay
over the
last weekend

Morro Rock
Pelagic Cormorant - possibly nesting
Canyon Wren
Rock Wren
Peregrine Falcon

Morro Bay
2 Eurasian Wigeon - seen off Sweet Springs
Glaucous-winged Gull - seen at the Marina
Greater Scaup (4) - in Marina by campgrounds

We spent Saturday in and around Morro bay and then travelled up Highway
58
to Carrizo Plain

on Highway 58 we had
Greater Roadrunner
Golden Eagle
Red-Breasted Sapsucker (3)
Ferruginous Hawk
California Thrasher

At Carrizo Plains Nature Center
Mountain Bluebird (2) just prior to center
Vesper Sparrow (in saltbush by center)
California Thrasher
Burrowing Owl (in field on right hand side of driveway up to Nature
Center)

On dirt road (Seven Mile Road?) back over to Highway 58
Sage Thrasher
Sage Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow - by water tank c. halfway down raod
Barn Owl (in hole on side of canyon just on junction to Highway 58)

Finally approx halfway down BitterWater Rd (?) to Highway 46
Praire Falcon

Andy Stone


SLOCo birding 07 Feb 00

Mike Stiles
 

I received this from Jim Royer. Thought I'd pass it along to the group.
For you out-of-towners Perfumo/See Canyons can be reached either from
Los Osos Valley Road in San Luis Obispo, or from Avila Bay Dr between
Hwy 101 and Avila Beach.

The weather cleared at the last minute and four of us went owling on
the
rescheduled Saturday night Morro Coast Audubon Society Owling
Fieldtrip,
2/5/00. We started by driving to the windmill located just on the
Perfumo
Canyon side of the end of the pavement for See Canyon Road - if you
started
from See Canyon proceed about two-tenths of a mile past the end of the
pavement (and the cattle guard). This windmill is also located next to
some
willow riparian habitat and a gate for a side road which heads toward
the
coast. Here we had a N.SAW-WHET OWL calling at about 9:00 (responding
to my
whistles but not calling close to us). A single well spaced whistle
later
was replaced by a more agitated sounding series of notes. This owl, or
a
Screech Owl, flew right over our heads. There were also two SCREECH
OWLS and
a GREAT-HORNED OWL here.
We tried other spots along the road without success, except for a spot
one-tenth of a mile on the See Canyon side of the end of the Perfumo
Canyon
pavement (the first end of the pavement when driving from Los Osos
Valley
Road). This is also about one-tenth past a large sign which mentions
cattle
and no trespassing on either side of the road. At this spot we heard a
SPOTTED OWL (responding to the double whistle call at the end of the
National
Geo Spotted Owl tape). It called repeatedly over about a thirty minute
period and at one point was right over head, but we could never see it
in the
dense trees. It made a variety of noises, with many whistles (two to
five in
a series), clicking sounds, and a bark or two, as well as other
indescribable
noises. We had a LONG-EARED OWL call twice nearby from the riparian
habitat
downslope from the Spotted. A BARN OWL was seen here also. We stayed
at
this spot from about ten p.m. till just after 11 p.m.

Jim Royer


SLOCo Birds for January 00

Tom Edell
 

Below is a draft of my Eureka column for the Morro Coast Audubon Society
Flyway newsletter for the month of January 2000. I would appreciate any
comments, additions, or corrections. Thanks.

Tom

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA
tedell@aol.com
===============================================
Eureka!
THE BIRDS OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY - JANUARY 2000

January was a fairly quiet month in SLOCo until the advent of the Morro Bay
Winter Bird Festival. This year the festival's all day boat trip on 1/15
produced the most exciting birds of the weekend. The boat headed for the
Santa Lucia Bank, which is approximately 26 to 27 miles WSW of Point Buchon.
Within minutes of arriving at the bank, a juvenile SHORT-TAILED ALBATROSS
(second record for Southern California in the last 100 years), adult LAYSAN
ALBATROSS, and adult BLACK-FOOTED ALBATROSS had flown over or around the boat
giving all aboard excellent looks. Other highlights of the trip were a
FLESH-FOOTED SHEARWATER, 6 PINKFOOTED SHEARWATERS, at least four SOOTY
SHEARWATERS, 10-12 POMARINE JAEGERS, 3-4 immature BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKES, a
COMMON MURRE, 10 CASSIN'S AUKLETS, and 450 RHINOCERUS AUKLETS. A rare SEI
WHALE topped off the day.

Cattle Egret -- Up to six near the Cal Poly Dairy Unit on 1/14 were the only
reported (TE).

Greater White-fronted Goose -- Up to two were present at Laguna Lake through
1/16+ (JC).

Snow Geese -- A group of two adults and two first winter birds were seen
around the Morro Bay Estuary from 1/8-30+ (JRo). A flock of 19 were feeding
in a field south of San Simeon Acres and West of Hwy 1 on 1/11 (GS) with
three there on 1/17 (TE). An adult was at Oceano County Park on 1/16 (CM).
Eight were in a field north of the Hearst Castle entrance off Hwy 1 on 1/17
(TE). Three were in a field along Oso Flaco Lake on 1/17 (JC).

Ross's Goose -- Unprecedented numbers continued to be seen in January. One
spending its time on the Morro Bay golf course fairway adjacent to the State
Park campground, later spent time trailing Camp Keep students near the State
Park Marina 1/9-25+ (JRo). Two wintering at Laguna Lake were reported from
1/11-16 (mob) and are probably still present. Three were in a field along Oso
Flaco Lake on 1/17 (JC). Eleven were in a field south of San Simeon Acres
and West of Hwy 1 on 1/28 (TE)

Brant -- The Morro Bay population rose to 3400 birds on 1/13 (JRo).
Canada Goose -- A small raced bird was seen at Oceano County Park on 1/16
(CM). Twenty-three were in a field north of the Hearst Castle entrance off
Hwy 1 on 1/17 (TE).

Eurasian Wigeon -- A high count of eight males were recorded on Morro Bay
during the month (KG,mob).

Black Scoter -- Two flew-by offshore of the bluffs north of Cayucos on 1/12
(BS). Two more were seen in Avila on 1/13 (BS).

Hooded Merganser -- Four, two males and two females, were present on Whale
Rock Reservoir on 1/14 (TE).

Bald Eagle -- An adult was seen off and on at Atascadero Lake between 1/13-27
(MH).

Ruff -- One found in the mudflat off Sweet Springs Nature Preserve on 1/13
(BB), may well be the same bird found there in October.

Glaucous Gull -- A first winter bird was seen at the north tip of the Morro
Bay Sandspit on 1/9 (JR).

Black Skimmer -- Two were present on Morro Bay through the month (mob).

Burrowing Owl -- A rain drenched bird was seen along the bluff at the
elephant seal parking area on 1/16-17 (TE).

Vaux's Swift -- Rare in winter, a dozen were seen flying over the Elfin
Forest on 1/30 (MS).

Rufous Hummingbird -- Early date, a young male was at a backyard feeder in
Arroyo Grande on 1/20 (BS).

Williamson's Sapsucker -- A female seen on 1/2-6 at the Saucito Ranch house
on the Carrizo Plain gave SLOCO its first County record (GB, TE,GS).

Pacific-slope Flycatcher -- One found near the feed bins at Cal Poly in
December, was refound on 1/11 (MS).

Cassin's Kingbird -- One found on the Cal Poly Campus in November was still
present on 1/4 (MS). Another was found in Arroyo Grande on 1/4 (BS).

Barn Swallow -- Rare in winter, one was seen at Oso Flaco Lake on 1/17 (JC).

Magnolia Warbler -- One present at the Oceano Campground lagoon since October
was still present as of 1/16 (CM).

Hermit Warbler -- One was seen in the Monterey pine forest in Cambria on 1/27
(KC).

Black-throated Gray Warbler -- Two were found at Oso Flaco Lake on 1/17 (JC).

Black-and-white Warbler -- The bird wintering at the Oceano Campground lagoon
was reported between 1/7-16 (JC,JS,CM).

Wilson's Warbler -- two were found at Oso Flaco Lake on 1/17 (JC).

Nelson's Sharp-tailed Sparrow -- The bird found on the Morro Bay State Park
marina spit in November, was refound during the high tides on 1/21-22 (TC,KC).

White-throated Sparrow -- The bird wintering at Cal Poly was seen again on
1/4 (MS).

OBSERVERS: Bill Bouton, George Butterworth, Ted Chandick, Jamie Chavez,
Karen Clarke, Tom Edell, Kimball Garrett, Marlin Harms, Curtis Marantz, John
Roser (JRo), Jim Royer, Brad Schram, Joe Seals, Greg Smith, Mike Stiles, and
mob = many observers. For information about birds or locations mentioned in
this report, contact Tom Edell at (805) 995-1691 or tedell@aol.com.

Tom Edell


Re: [sbcobirding] Lake trip

Joe Seals <gardenguru@...>
 

Before others start adding to the "strictly sbco or
sloco birds" in the listserves enforcement serial, let
me state that my intent was to offer a little humor to
the two groups. I certainly did not and do not wish
to rile the purists and I now promise this will never
happen again. I will found an "Odd Birding Trips"
listserve group and will send out invitations shortly.

Joe
utopiabirding@zgroups.com

--- Jim Greaves <greaves@mail.silcom.com> wrote:
Meaning no disrespect here, but when I mentioned
Stilt Sandpipers in
Ventura last week, someone quite bluntly said
(privately) I should use
Ventura County list. Might I suggest a German
birding list for these "odd"
sightings, or will this now become a
travelogue-list? :-)

At 6:36 AM -0800 1/31/00, Joe Seals wrote:
All:
I took a quick trip down to the lake last
Thursday and, even in the foggy, cloudy weather, I
had
some interesting sitings.
The usuals were there: lots of MALLARDS,
SCAUPS,
CORMORANTS, BLACKBIRDS, RING-NECKED DUCKS, and
BLACK-NECKED (EARED) GREBES. But there were plenty
of
TUFTED DUCKS, a few POCHARDS, and one winter female
LONG-TAILED DUCK among a small group of mallards.
Especially exciting was a LITTLE AUK (a lifer for
me)
near the breakwater to the marina.
Did I forget to say that this was a trip to
Lake
Constance (Die Bodansee) on the
German-Austrian-Swiss
border? Had you going for a moment, didn't I?
I was on a training visit to our German
partners
and was allowed one-afternoon "sight-seeing".
Other
lifers for me: MARSH TIT (at the bird feeders at
the
company) and a SHORT-TOED TREECREEPER (no, I didn't
make this up) on the tree as I stood waiting for
the
hotel shuttle bus back to the airport.
The LITTLE AUK was special in that they are
strictly ocean and coast birds that only rarely
"crash
land" on inland waters after storms.
Joe Seals
Santa Maria
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Lake trip

Joe Seals <gardenguru@...>
 

All:

I took a quick trip down to the lake last
Thursday and, even in the foggy, cloudy weather, I had
some interesting sitings.

The usuals were there: lots of MALLARDS, SCAUPS,
CORMORANTS, BLACKBIRDS, RING-NECKED DUCKS, and
BLACK-NECKED (EARED) GREBES. But there were plenty of
TUFTED DUCKS, a few POCHARDS, and one winter female
LONG-TAILED DUCK among a small group of mallards.
Especially exciting was a LITTLE AUK (a lifer for me)
near the breakwater to the marina.

Did I forget to say that this was a trip to Lake
Constance (Die Bodansee) on the German-Austrian-Swiss
border? Had you going for a moment, didn't I?

I was on a training visit to our German partners
and was allowed one-afternoon "sight-seeing". Other
lifers for me: MARSH TIT (at the bird feeders at the
company) and a SHORT-TOED TREECREEPER (no, I didn't
make this up) on the tree as I stood waiting for the
hotel shuttle bus back to the airport.

The LITTLE AUK was special in that they are
strictly ocean and coast birds that only rarely "crash
land" on inland waters after storms.

Joe Seals
Santa Maria
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Talk to your friends online with Yahoo! Messenger.
http://im.yahoo.com


SLOCo birds 30 Jan 2000

Mike Stiles
 

Today I saw a flock of about 12 Vaux's Swifts. They were flying over
the Elfin Forest in Los Osos. There are winter records for this bird,
but they are uncommon this time of year.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos,CA
mstiles@calpoly.edu


North Coast 1/28

Tom Edell
 

I took my daughter to school this morning (Cambria) and decided I might as
well look around a little while since I was up that way. It was nice to see
that the northern creek mouths had broken, thought what is left of the
lagoons won't interest as many birds. There was a good group of gulls on the
beach at the mouth of Santa Rosa Creek that had 164 Mew, 82 California, 20
Western, 3 Heermann's, 2 Glaucous-winged, 2 Herring and a single Ring-billed.
Further north and just south of San Simeon Acres in a cattle grazed field
west of Hwy 1 was a flock of 11 ROSS'S GEESE. On my drive south I saw them
flying to the north. Just south of San Simeon Cove I stopped to scope
offshore for murrelets without luck. I did see four White-winged Scoters
(fairly scarce this winter) and 80-100 Red-throated Loons spread along the
coast, which is more than I would have expected. A tight group of 5 Pacific
Loons were also in the area. North of Hearst Castle an adult FERRUGIONUS
HAWK was on a telephone pole adjacent to Hwy 1. I drove north as far as the
elephant seal parking area where I stopped to look through the gulls. I was
up this way during the Winter Bird Festival and found an assortment of birds
partaking in the feeding opportunity provided but the ongoing puping. There
were far fewer gulls than I expected and nothing of note. Always interesting
to watch and listen to the seals squabble though.

Tom

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA
tedell@aol.com


peregrines

Mike Stiles
 

Steve
I have an anecdote of strange Peregrine behavior you might be
interested in. I was hiking the sand spit and heard a bird screaming. I
saw a Peregrine on the ground about a foot away from a Marbled Godwit.
The Peregrine was screaming at the Godwit, but they both just stood
there eyeing each other. After a few minutes the Peregrine flew away,
and a few minutes after that, the Godwit flew off.

I wasn't sure if the falcon needed the godwit to fly so it could kill
it. Do they take prey from the ground?

Mike Stiles
Los Osos, CA
mstiles@calpoly.edu


Kites

Weinstein <morwein@...>
 

For at least the past several evenings in Orcutt there has been a roost of
more than 50 (perhaps 100!) white-tailed kites. With so many birds being so
active, it is hard to get a precise number, but I counted over 50 perched
birds, with more flying around in the general area, and more coming in from
other areas all the time. A friend estimated about 100 birds yesterday. A
very impressive sight!

The roost is along the bend in S. Broadway, where it becomes W. Rice Ranch
Rd. It's just a couple blocks off Clark, very easy to find.

Mike.


Morro Rock peregrine falcons

Steve Schubert <S_Schub@...>
 

I appreciate the several e-mails about peregrines...please keep me
informed of your sightings and behaviors this season (might be best to
e-mail me directly and not to the entire group unless you think it is
really noteworthy). I will be completing writing the article about the
history of the falcons at the Rock this season, covering more than 30
years. Thanks for your comments.
Steve


Jan 27,2000

Karen Clarke <seachest@...>
 

I heard a singing Hutton's Vireo and saw a Hermit Warbler in the Liemert Tract, Cambria today. 
 
I saw possibly the first Elephant Seal asleep on the beach in front of my house on Moonstone Beach Drive, Cambria.  Someone must have reported its presence as the Marine Mammal Center truck was parked in front of my house, too.
 
Karen C.


bald eagle

Marlin Harms
 

There has been an adult bald eagle at Atascadero Lake off & on. I first saw
it 13 January & was told by a local resident that it had appeared nearly
every day for a week, coming at 9:30 & leaving by noon. I checked frequently
after that, but did not see it. Today, Joan Carter & I saw it just before
11:00, then again at 3:30. Each time it has been in a very tall tree above a
house at 9576 Marchant Way, which is the very short street next to the lake
on the west side.
Marlin Harms


Re: Morro Bay

Richard Boyd <boyd@...>
 

Peregrines

They have been hanging around at times for several days on the island in
the Bay where the white pelicans haul out. They spent major time there most
of last winter.

Dick Boyd

The golf course Ross's goose has now approached and joined the "flock"
of Camp Keep students out on the mudflats by the state park marina these
last two days, preening and napping 2o feet away.

Pair of adult peregrine falcons at Morro Rock today, with chuppng
vocalizations and hanging around the upper potholes- the breeding adult
female died last June after three chicks were fostered and fledged- so
there may be a replacement
female this season.

A sea otter vigorously consumed an 8-inch long ocotpus near Morro Rock
in the harbor today.

Steve


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Re: Morro Bay

Michael Ray <mray65@...>
 

On the subject of Morro Bay peregrine falcons:

Early Tuesday morning this week I watched one make at least five or six dives at
the plastic owl above the police station.


Morro Bay

Steve Schubert <S_Schub@...>
 

The golf course Ross's goose has now approached and joined the "flock"
of Camp Keep students out on the mudflats by the state park marina these
last two days, preening and napping 2o feet away.

Pair of adult peregrine falcons at Morro Rock today, with chuppng
vocalizations and hanging around the upper potholes- the breeding adult
female died last June after three chicks were fostered and fledged- so
there may be a replacement
female this season.

A sea otter vigorously consumed an 8-inch long ocotpus near Morro Rock
in the harbor today.

Steve


Intro Field Guide

Brad Schram
 

Hi All:

Continuing the discussion started by my question about local introductory
birding classes:

In mid-December I got an e-mail from Kenn Kaufman making semi-public a
project he told me he was working on--a new N American guide for beginning
birders. I recently touched base with Kenn and asked if it was now public
knowledge to be shared and was told it is.

I stripped off some introductory comments and copy the body of the text
below. It sounds like a great resource for beginners and beginning birding
classes.

Brad

[Kenn's remarks, sent to some friends in December, below]

Yes, I'm working on a field guide. A guide to all birds, all of North
America. But birders I've told so far have jumped to the same conclusion:
this book should be big, advanced, cutting-edge, filled with new details,
pushing the limits of identifying subspecies and rarities. There seems to
be a universal perception that all field guides should strive for that.
Actually, I'm going the opposite direction. This note is to explain some of
my rationale in advance.

Here's my starting point. Say I have some friends who are sharp,
intelligent, curious people, and they've decided to try birding... but on
their own, not going with organized trips. What field guide do I recommend
to them?

Well -- at the moment, there isn't a good one to recommend. The
Petersons come closest, but they're drifting out of date, and the separation
of plates and maps is irksome. The Golden Guide is out of date, and
problems with its illustrations are well known. We all know that photo
guides, the way they've been done in the past, aren't effective for
identification. The National Geographic is great for experts, but it is
very clearly and pointedly not meant for new birders. And I'm looking
forward to the Sibley guide as much as anyone, but at two volumes and eight
or nine hundred pages, it won't be something for casual birders to toss in
the daypack.

For my friends who are just getting into birds, there is not a good guide
to recommend. So I'm working on such a book now. (There are good people
working with me on it, too, but I'm the one who will take the blame for
anything wrong with it, hence the first-person tone of this note.)

To get started on the book, I had to make basic decisions. Fortunately,
in the nine years since my Advanced Birding was published, I've spent loads
of time talking to casual or beginning birders, so I had a basis for
deciding questions like these:

---- Should the book include only common birds? My answer is, No.
Everything that occurs regularly has to be there. Even a total beginner
will wonder, "Could it be something else?"

---- Should the book include extreme rarities? Generally, no. Particularly
not Attu specialties; anyone who goes vagrant-hunting in Alaska will go with
experienced leaders or will carry more heavy-duty references. Ditto for
very rare pelagics; no one sees those on their own. Ditto for those that
are very hard to identify; inexperienced birders should not even be thinking
about Little Stints -- only a minority of birders have even worked out the
differences between Leasts and Semis. The more extreme rarities are
included, the more likely people are to be confused or to misidentify what
they see.

---- Should the book be arranged in the latest AOU sequence? Not when it
means that similar species won't be close together. The purpose of a guide,
obviously, is not to teach checklist order (which will change again anyway);
it's to allow people to put names on birds.

---- Should the book show subtle differences among subspecies? Yes if these
affect the identification to species; otherwise, no. You and I may care
about the race of a Spotted Towhee, but 99.9 per cent of birdwatchers are
happy to get it to species. Some recent books make people think they can
identify birds to subspecies in cases where they really can't.

---- Should the book show subtle age and gender differences? Again, only if
the differences are noticeable enough to make people wonder about the
species identification. Some recent books make people think they can
identify birds to age and sex in cases where they really can't.

With these points in mind, I'm working on a field guide that's intended
to be complete but compact, highly accurate without being overwhelmingly
detailed, with thorough attention to the basics and with the attitude that
these birds are all exciting and worth seeing.

I already know that some experts (especially those who deal with the
public) will welcome a high-quality, entry-level guide. But some will
insist that every beginner should start with an advanced field guide. I
think that idea is based on a false perception of the typical beginner. The
typical beginner is not Claudia Wilds on her first Chincoteague survey, or
Steve Howell on his first Mexico trip. And I'm certainly not talking about
kids, like some of these amazing kid birders in ABA today. A youngster who
gets into it, with all that time and energy, may build their skill and
knowledge very rapidly -- it's misleading to think of them as "beginners."

No, the typical beginner -- the one who makes up 99.9 per cent of the
bird watching public -- has other interests besides birds, and other demands
on his/her time, and will never be able to devote a lot of time to
developing their skill. The typical beginner will never become an expert,
AND THERE IS NO REASON WHY THEY SHOULD. The purpose of a standard field
guide should NOT be to turn beginners into experts, but rather to help
people enjoy birding.

Why do I care so much about beginning / casual birders? Simple answer.
Bird habitats face monumental threats. Birds and nature need all the
friends they can get. Someone who's totally thrilled by their first Yellow
Warbler today may vote in favor of habitat protection tomorrow. Anyone who
cares about conservation should want birding to be as open and welcoming
and inclusive as possible. We need to cater to the entry level, the first
step -- not insist that everyone should learn to swim by being dumped into
the deep end of the pool.

So that's my new focus. It's coming along well. I'm already resigned to
the inevitable: some short-sighted hotshots will write blistering reviews
of my new field guide merely because it's not intended for experts. (Fair
is fair -- I did the same thing to Roger when his revised eastern guide came
out two decades ago.) But regardless, I wanted to let you know what I was
working on before the news gets out to the general birding public.

Kenn Kaufman


Classes

Brad Schram
 

Hi Birders:

It's been suggested that I publish here my findings based on the question:
what local bird classes are available? What I found follows below:

1. Steve Schubert teaches "Birding the Morro Bay Estuary" each November or
December at Cuesta College. He also teaches a birds of prey class there in
February.

2. Ted Pope runs an introductory class available through Wild Birds
Unlimited store in the Marigold Center on Broad St. in SLO.

3. Mick Bondello teaches an intro. class each spring at Hancock College.
One source says it is typically a month long held on consecutive Saturday
mornings. I was told it's taking place in February and March this year. If
Mick sees this (or one of his pupils) maybe an exact date can be clarified
for this year.

4. Francis Villablanca teaches an intro. ornithology class at Cal Poly.
One could contact Cal Poly or Francis for further information.

5. Coincidentally, I'll be doing an introductory birding tour for Victor
Emanuel Nature Tours, based at the Inn at Morro Bay, November 3-6, 2000.
This is a new type of tour Victor is offering due to client request; info is
available through the VENT office.

Brad


Re: Classes

Tom Edell
 

Brad,

Thanks for posting information on birding classes offered between Santa Maria
and Morro Bay. I thought I'd add one more class that is much more informal
than the others mentioned. The Morro Coast Audubon Society offers its Ebb
Tide program to beginning birders a couple of times each month at the Audubon
Overlook. The Overlook is located at the north end of 3rd Street in Los
Osos. I don't know the exact dates but perhaps someone out there can post
that information for anyone interested. It may also be on the Morro Coast
Audubon Web Page. Sorry but I don't know the web address for the page.

Tom

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA
tedell@aol.com

In a message dated 01/24/2000 8:35:38 PM Pacific Standard Time,
gonebrdn@lightspeed.net writes:

<< Hi Birders:

It's been suggested that I publish here my findings based on the question:
what local bird classes are available? What I found follows below:

1. Steve Schubert teaches "Birding the Morro Bay Estuary" each November or
December at Cuesta College. He also teaches a birds of prey class there in
February.

2. Ted Pope runs an introductory class available through Wild Birds
Unlimited store in the Marigold Center on Broad St. in SLO.

3. Mick Bondello teaches an intro. class each spring at Hancock College.
One source says it is typically a month long held on consecutive Saturday
mornings. I was told it's taking place in February and March this year. If
Mick sees this (or one of his pupils) maybe an exact date can be clarified
for this year.

4. Francis Villablanca teaches an intro. ornithology class at Cal Poly.
One could contact Cal Poly or Francis for further information.

5. Coincidentally, I'll be doing an introductory birding tour for Victor
Emanuel Nature Tours, based at the Inn at Morro Bay, November 3-6, 2000.
This is a new type of tour Victor is offering due to client request; info is
available through the VENT office.
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Class

Brad Schram
 

Thanks to all who responded to my question about basic birding classes
locally. I passed on quite a list.

Brad

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