Date   

[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Pacific Golden-Plover (2 reports)
- Broad-winged Hawk (1 report)
- Tennessee Warbler (1 report)
- Northern Parula (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 24, 2020 09:45 by Tom Edell
- Point Sierra Nevada Beach, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.717177,-121.3134003&ll=35.717177,-121.3134003
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74022110
- Media: 7 Photos
- Comments: "Slightly small and thinner, and stood more upright, than nearby Black-bellied Plovers. Golden spots on wings and back, short primary projection, obvious cap, and mottled dark spots on belly. Probably the same adult that was present here last winter and previously reported this fall on 13-17 Aug (Photos)"

Pacific Golden-Plover (Pluvialis fulva) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 24, 2020 09:45 by Mike Bush
- Point Sierra Nevada Beach, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.717177,-121.3134003&ll=35.717177,-121.3134003
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74023369
- Media: 7 Photos
- Comments: "Slightly small and thinner, and stood more upright, than nearby Black-bellied Plovers. Golden spots on wings and back, short primary projection, obvious cap, and mottled dark spots on belly. Probably the same adult that was present here last winter and previously reported this fall on 13-17 Aug (Photos)"

Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus) (1)
- Reported Sep 23, 2020 15:50 by Wendy Walwyn
- Oso Flaco Lake (not for beach/ocean), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.0302072,-120.6207848&ll=35.0302072,-120.6207848
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74011861
- Comments: "Pale underneath brown above smaller than a red shouldered or red tail hawk. No barring on tail. dark outline to trailing edge of broad light wings, small head and longer tail, tail bands not obvious suggesting an immature hawk."

Tennessee Warbler (Leiothlypis peregrina) (1)
- Reported Sep 25, 2020 07:50 by Nick Belardes
- Meadow Park, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2675798,-120.6606531&ll=35.2675798,-120.6606531
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74039409
- Comments: "Continuing since Sept. 21. Spotted among mixed warbler flock in tree bearing fruit along fence in southeast end of park. Bird foraged, moving quickly, then perched and ate for several seconds before moving on. Got a clear view of white undertail coverts as it foraged, and side view of bird’s dark eyeline and pale supercilium while it perched and ate."

Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) (1)
- Reported Sep 25, 2020 08:28 by Tom Edell
- Del Mar Park--Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3987056,-120.8586752&ll=35.3987056,-120.8586752
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74048362
- Media: 5 Photos
- Comments: "Found in the first willow up creek of the pedestrian bridge where it was foraging in the upper half of the canopy about 15-20 feet above the creek. Easy to distinguish with its bright yellow throat and breast, white belly, long white undertail coverts and short tailed look, blue-gray wings with two white wing bars, and yellow-green back. Photos show white above and below the eye, green in the crown and nape, and a faint reddish wash on the breast. The bird was in view for a couple of minutes and then disappeared."

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Suet

Bob Chapman
 

Hey SLO Birders,

Any suet makers out there? My sister makes a variety of tasty suets (so say the birds) and I have been saving my bacon grease for her. Unfortunately I won't be seeing her this year.

I have 8 quarts of bacon grease for any suet maker who would like it.

Email me, let me know.

Bob Chapman
Los Osos


North Coast Birds, 9/24

Tom Edell
 

Mike Bush and I checked San Carpoforo Creek, Point Sierra Nevada Beach, and Santa Rosa Creek mouth this morning. Our highlight at San Carpoforo was two juvenile Common Mergansers. The adult Pacific Golden-Plover continued on the beach at Point Sierra Nevada where we also had two juvenile Baird’s Sandpipers and a Ferruginous Hawk. A Pectoral Sandpiper continued at Santa Rosa Creek.

 

Tom Edell

Cayucos, CA


--

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Broad-winged Hawk (1 report)
- Blackpoll Warbler (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Broad-winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus) (1)
- Reported Sep 23, 2020 15:50 by Peggy Burhenn
- Oso Flaco Lake (not for beach/ocean), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.0302072,-120.6207848&ll=35.0302072,-120.6207848
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73984433
- Comments: "Pale underneath brown above smaller than a red shouldered or red tail hawk. No barring on tail. dark outline to trailing edge of broad light wings, small head and longer tail, tail bands not obvious suggesting an immature hawk."

Blackpoll Warbler (Setophaga striata) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 24, 2020 08:00 by Rick Saval
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74007558
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Likely continues as reported by T Edell on 22 SEP 2020, today at Coolidge/Norswing; 3 poor photos."

Blackpoll Warbler (Setophaga striata) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 24, 2020 07:51 by Will Knowlton
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74005468
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Photos. Along Pier Ave. trail. Streaked back and yellowish feet."

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Morro Bay Sand Spit

Kevin Zimmer
 

Yesterday (Wednesday, 9/23), I spent the better part of the day (0900h–1500h) hiking somewhere between 8-10 miles roundtrip along the ocean side of the sand spit at Morro Bay, from the trail head at Sand Spit Road (Montaña de Oro SP) all the way to the north end of the spit and back.

My efforts turned up nothing particularly unusual, but the shorebird show was spectacular!  Scattered Long-billed Curlews, Marbled Godwits, Whimbrels, Willets, Black-bellied Plovers and Sanderlings were feeding at the surf line for the length of the hike, the Sanderlings periodically in large groups.  But the numbers of shorebirds loafing or feeding in the wrack line well off the beach were truly impressive, and became more impressive the closer I got to the north end of the spit.  These included big concentrations of Western and Least sandpipers and Sanderlings, with small numbers of Dunlin and Ruddy and Black turnstones mixed in, as well as good numbers of Semipalmated and Snowy plovers.

In contrast to my hike of Sept 4 along the same route, I encountered many fewer gulls (Heermann’s, California & Western), and ZERO Elegant Terns (only a few Caspians this time).  My first Merlin(s) of the year sent the concentrations of shorebirds into frenzied flight on two occasions, the first around 1000h, and the second at around 1400h.  Once again, a pair of Ospreys patrolled the shoreline throughout the day, and I witnessed two successful plunges into the surf for large fish.

The most unusual thing that I saw (and photographed) is what appeared to be a melanistic Western Sandpiper — brown all over (a shade lighter than a juvenile Heermann’s Gull) – something I’ve never seen before, anywhere.  The bird did not appear to be stained or oiled — it appeared to be pigmentation to the feathers.

Here are the estimated numbers for the 14 species of shorebirds encountered (based upon unidirectional counts so as not double-count):

Black-bellied Plover  -  75
Snowy Plover  -  50-60 (One was color-banded on both legs:  I couldn’t determine the colors on the left leg, but the right leg had a red band over a light blue band.), including many juveniles.
Semipalmated Plover  -  140 (Including 58 that I counted in one sweep of the binoculars from a single spot.)
Killdeer  - 2
Ruddy Turnstone  -  5
Black Turnstone  -  2
Marbled Godwits  -  250
Long-billed Curlew  -  120
Whimbrel  -  15
Willet  -  50
Sanderling  -  1300
Least Sandpiper  -  650
Western Sandpiper  -  1800
Dunlin  -  15


Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Tennessee Warbler (1 report)
- Blackpoll Warbler (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Tennessee Warbler (Leiothlypis peregrina) (1)
- Reported Sep 23, 2020 07:37 by Nick Belardes
- Meadow Park, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2675798,-120.6606531&ll=35.2675798,-120.6606531
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73963068
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Clean white underside, including vent, undertail coverts and belly. Pale yellow throat. Dark eyeline, pale supercilium. Lime green wings, crown, neck and back. In mixed flock with Yellow-rumped, Townsend’s male, and Orange-crowned warblers. Spotted bird on my second visit to tree bearing fruit on Northeast end of park at end of condos. Spotted the underside of bird, then a side view. The bird appeared a second time as well while viewing species in same tree. On my first visit to this tree this morning I only saw Yellow-rumped Warblers. I then explored the community garden, baseball field, and did a second viewing of another active warbler area before returning to this tree, where another flock had arrived. I knew it was another flock because I hadn’t seen or heard any Townsend’s in the park until arriving back to this tree that also had the Tennessee in it. The bird foraged quickly, only pausing a few times, and not long enough for me to grab a photo."

Blackpoll Warbler (Setophaga striata) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 22, 2020 09:22 by Tom Edell
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73942375
- Comments: "Seen along the lagoon trail where it parallels Pier Avenue. The bird was foraging in the upper branches of arroyo willows and loosely associating with a mixed flock of chickadees and warblers. We had one brief open view of the bird, but most views were obstructed and often back lit. When first seen I observed the white wingbars and white belly and undertails coverts. As it moved from branch to branch, the yellow throat and upper breast, the dark streaks on a greenish back, and a dark eyeline were noted. I never saw the color of the legs or feet and do not recall how prominent the streaks were on the side of the breast. Lots of poor views. No photos taken."

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


White-crowned Sparrow

mike stiles
 

Like Kaaren Perry, I like to note WCSP arrival dates. My first-of-season White-crowned showed yesterday, an orangish-billed adult Gambel's subspecies. I've been noting arrival dates since 2007. The earliest in the yard was Sep 11th, 2016. The White-crowns always show before the Golden-crowns, except for 2010 when I saw them together.

Of course, those dates are when I saw them. They easily could have come and gone previously, unseen.

I refer often to "Sparrows of the United States and Canada", by David Beadle and James Rising. The second edition "Photographic Guide". Nice descriptions of the subspecies, with photos. 

Mike Stiles
Los Osos





Wood ducks

Victoria Morrow
 

There are three wood ducks at Atascadero Lake hanging around the southern tip behind the island, one male and two females. I saw the pair several days ago and then the three yesterday.

Vicki Morrow


Fiscalini Sounds

Tom Graves
 

I’ve been taking weekend walks thru the woods at Fiscalini Ranch, hearing this and that, wondering what’s making the sounds. One sound was a screech, another a series of peeps. The screech was deep in the woods, unseen, the peeps high up in the pines, too far away to ID (or was I too lazy?)
I finally saw the screech bird: https://www.xeno-canto.org/590430 .

 

The peep, I think I’ve nailed down as a Pygmy Nuthatch, listed as a mystery, to get confirmation, on XenoCanto: https://www.xeno-canto.org/590431 . It sounds like something I’ver heard before, and should know, such a simple sound, but I’ve never seen one locally, and have never recorded one. 

 

Bird like no one’s watching, 

Tom Graves


WOOD DUCK in Nipomo

Thomas Slater
 

This afternoon I birded Mesa Road inside the Trilogy development. I stayed just on Mesa Rd (AWAY FROM HOUSES) and came up with over 35 species. It's a fun place because it has birds that Nipomo proper doesn't have like COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, GREEN HERON, and KINGFISHER. 

Mesa Road

I also visited the Woodlands ponds and the female WOOD DUCK is still present. There were also 5 BLUE-WINGED TEAL, a bunch of Mallards, and Gadwalls.

Woodlands Mutual Water Ponds (Trilogy WTP)


Bird on,

Tom Slater
Niomo


White-crowned Sparrow - Morro Bay

Kaaren Perry
 

My First of Season (FOS)  White-crowned Sparrow arrived this afternoon, 9/22.  Arrival was the exact date same as last September and what appears to be also a bird of the Gambel's subspecies.   Last year's bird was a juvenile and this year an adult.  

I find it fun/interesting to attempt to determine possible subspecies.  I would love to learn if other FOS White-crowend Sparrows being seen now could also be considered as the Gambel's subspecies.

I have put up a photo of our todays arrival on flickr.   Several of our bird guides do a nice job of separating the subspecies by region and migration characteristics.  (My favorite -  Nat'l Geographic 7th). 












Hummingbirds and White crowned Sparrows

Cheryl Lish
 

Hummingbird food consumption dropped beginning last Friday when the wind started to blow and the sky cleared of smoke. They are now going through about 4 gallons per day.
I also saw my first White crowned Sparrows yesterday 09/21. Confirmed 4 in the front ‘yard’ and heard some in the backyard/field but can’t be certain if they were additional birds. At least one of them is a returning bird. It landed a few feet from me - expecting a peanut chip. (Looked right at me) Fortunately I had some on me.
Cheryl Lish Arroyo Grande


Re: Meadow Park

Kaaren Perry
 

Maybe time to move this discussion off line??

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay

On Sep 22, 2020, at 2:07 PM, Linda Sewell <lmsewell1@...> wrote:

Last year I finally found the house in question. With binoculars it’s possible to see the sign. Looking at google maps, the sign is on a fence facing the park on what I would call the west side, opposite of South street. Hopefully someone will chime in with more precise directions. Lastly, Mike are you the Mike Schaefer I worked with for years?

Linda Sewell

On Sep 22, 2020, at 12:53 PM, Michael Schaefer <schaeferbirdman@...> wrote:

So glad you said this! I felt like a total loser spending several hours looking for that house to no avail!
On Sep 22, 2020, at 12:51 PM, Lynne Breakstone <breakstonelynne@...> wrote:

I go to Meadow Park often and have never found a house with a sign that says Casa Diablo. If you use that term, would you please be more specific about where it is? Is it a sign on one of the houses that edge the park on the south side?
Thank you,
Lynne Breakstone











[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Solitary Sandpiper (1 report)
- Red-breasted Sapsucker (1 report)
- Brown Thrasher (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Solitary Sandpiper (Tringa solitaria) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 21, 2020 09:45 by Roger Zachary
- Pico Ave/Pico Creek, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.6142448,-121.1473399&ll=35.6142448,-121.1473399
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73889226
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "White eyering (spectacles); legs greenish; brown back with spots; 2 images"

Red-breasted Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus ruber) (1)
- Reported Sep 22, 2020 09:57 by Rudy Lucero
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73930460
- Comments: "Sapsucker with streaky red on head, breast and neck seen along the service road among Nutall's and Flickers."

Brown Thrasher (Toxostoma rufum) (2)
- Reported Sep 22, 2020 09:39 by Tiki Kieth
- 5525 San Jacinto Avenue, Atascadero, California, US (35.498, -120.674), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4978389,-120.6736803&ll=35.4978389,-120.6736803
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73925291
- Comments: "Foraging"

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Re: Meadow Park

Linda Sewell
 

Last year I finally found the house in question. With binoculars it’s possible to see the sign. Looking at google maps, the sign is on a fence facing the park on what I would call the west side, opposite of South street. Hopefully someone will chime in with more precise directions. Lastly, Mike are you the Mike Schaefer I worked with for years?

Linda Sewell

On Sep 22, 2020, at 12:53 PM, Michael Schaefer <schaeferbirdman@...> wrote:

So glad you said this! I felt like a total loser spending several hours looking for that house to no avail!
On Sep 22, 2020, at 12:51 PM, Lynne Breakstone <breakstonelynne@...> wrote:

I go to Meadow Park often and have never found a house with a sign that says Casa Diablo. If you use that term, would you please be more specific about where it is? Is it a sign on one of the houses that edge the park on the south side?
Thank you,
Lynne Breakstone








Re: Meadow Park

Michael Schaefer
 

So glad you said this! I felt like a total loser spending several hours looking for that house to no avail!

On Sep 22, 2020, at 12:51 PM, Lynne Breakstone <breakstonelynne@...> wrote:

I go to Meadow Park often and have never found a house with a sign that says Casa Diablo. If you use that term, would you please be more specific about where it is? Is it a sign on one of the houses that edge the park on the south side?
Thank you,
Lynne Breakstone





Re: Meadow Park

Lynne Breakstone
 

I go to Meadow Park often and have never found a house with a sign that says Casa Diablo. If you use that term, would you please be more specific about where it is? Is it a sign on one of the houses that edge the park on the south side?
Thank you,
Lynne Breakstone


Pecho Willows

Bob Chapman
 

Nothing exciting here but a nice break from report writing.

Yesterday FOS Hermit Thrush

Bob Chapman
Los Osos


Darkeyed Junco (Oregon)

njmann90
 

I still have first year DE Junco (now molting) in the yard.  Just a breeding info post.
Near Vet's Hall SLO
NJMann

--
Nancy Jean Mann
San Luis Obispo
njmann50@...

"A duck a day!!!!"  William Henry "Hank" Deveraux, Jr.'

“On some great and glorious day, the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.”  H.L. Mencken

'I've seen so much stupid in my years that I can't remember all of it,'  2014 James Turner


.









thoughts on yesterday's (9/21) duck from Oso Flaco

Kevin Zimmer
 

Jim Royer asked if I would post my analysis of yesterday's duck, studied by at least 4 observers (I should stress that I was not among those who saw the bird in life), and initially thought to be a possible Garganey, from Oso Flaco Lake. So, here goes.

When first sent 2 screen-grabs from the back of the camera and asked my thoughts, I ventured that the facial pattern was suggestive of a female Garganey, as was the size of the bill, which looked proportionately large in one of the 2 photos. But, in those tiny photos (as viewed on my phone), I could see no detail on the folded wing, and there appeared to be some orange color along the juncture of the bill, which I knew was problematic if not an artifact of ambient light or camera exposure.

A short time later, Jim emailed me a whole series of photos, which I was able to examine in greater detail on my computer screen. With more material to work from, I concluded that the bird had to be a female Green-winged Teal for the following reasons (as originally iterated to Jim last night):

After looking at all of the photos, I am thinking this bird has to be a female Green-winged Teal. It looks a bit paler overall than usual, but it also looks as if these photos may be a bit overexposed, and that could account for the pallid look. It has a bit stronger facial pattern than most female GWTE, but not outside the range of variation. When I looked at the first 2 photos on my phone, the bill appeared proportionately large, but when viewed on my laptop, the bill looks consistently small, which is better for GWTE and wrong for Garganey.

Most importantly, in several of these photos, you can see a sliver of the wing speculum, and it is clearly shining green. The speculum in Garganey is fairly colorless — sort of a slate-gray, prominently framed by white. It also appears as if the under tail-coverts and part of the crissum/vent are white, and that is also wrong for Garganey, which has those areas heavily mottled and streaked with brown. I checked that against my photos of the Waller Park bird from 2017.

It’s hard to be 100% definitive, because the photos seem to have been taken at a fair distance, but I’d say the bill size, white vent and (especially) what appears to be a shiny green speculum in the wing rules out Garganey. Also, although it may be just a matter of perspective, in one photo, the bird appears distinctly smaller than a nearby American Coot, which also suggests GWTE rather than Garganey.


Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero

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