Date   

Audubon Overlook, Los Osos

Kaaren Perry
 

As you may have recently noticed, many of the returning shorebirds are showing bright, crisp and often colorful juvenile plumages. Yesterday at the 4th St Audubon Overlook was no exception.  At the afternoon receding tide there were examples of bright juvenile Western and Least Sandpipers, one juv. Black-bellied Plover that appeared to be in juv. plumage and several juv. Willets.  I do find it fun to spot these youngsters as they are returning from their far north breeding grounds. 

A single Belted Kingfisher resting on the nearby pier was showing the brownish breast band of a juvenile. They are reported to breed within SLO county.  Photo now on flickr.




[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Black Skimmer (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger) (1)
- Reported Aug 02, 2020 11:29 by Jeff Miller
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72049679
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Photos"

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Re: Red-shouldered Hawk family in euc grove

Mark Holmgren
 

I'll take the bait.
I'd be a bit more comfortable if I knew what the dark object was just above the victim's pink foot.  Nevertheless, the victim is young, like a fledgling or nestling because its feet are large (baby birds' feet grow large quickly).  I don't know of a native fledgling bird with pink feet.  The legs are short and sturdy and placed rather towards the rear of the body.  The plumage is cryptic. 
Young hawks (esp. one still in a family group) are notoriously bad hunters.  This was a teaching moment for the kids.  It looks like the family was after easy prey.  Is it possible that the adult made the capture and handed the prey to one of its fledglings?  If not that, then something gave the young hawk an advantage.  
Is there a yard with caged baby fowl in the vicinity?  I'm guessing this was a caged, captive-bred quail or chicken of some sort. 

Mark Holmgren
Santa Barbara

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 3:04 PM <Daleball56@...> wrote:
Hello All,
This is my first time posting. I've been lurking for a few months, curious to see what birds are about. My husband and I just moved to the Los Osos area less than three weeks ago, from Boulder, CO. We are both avid birders and so of course set out into the trees, dunes, and beaches to see what we could find in our neighborhood.
About a week ago we started seeing and hearing a family of Red-shoulders in the euc grove at the end of Monarch Lane, here in the Monarch Grove subdivision. Last week, on July 30th, about 9am, I witnessed two juveniles and what looked like the two adults swirl about in a noisy melee. Seconds before, one of the juvs was in pursuit of a few barn swallows, snatching at the in the air with its talons and was joined by another juv, and then suddenly there were more small birds ( not swallows) and then one of the adults came on the scene shrieking its approach. Four hawks swirling around grabbing at small birds, all shrieking, and all within 30 feet off the ground. What a show! During that whole time another juvenile quietly watched from a perch over the sandy path. I realized once all the birds quickly dispersed that one hawk had flown up into a tree and was clutching a bird it had caught. Luckily I had my camera so took a few snaps. It was very misty and grey, so not a great shot, but I was thrilled to have seen the show and gotten a picture at all. I am wondering about the victim in the talons..a fledgling Redwing maybe? 
Looking forward to the migration season!
Dale Ball
Los Osos, CA


Red-shouldered Hawk family in euc grove

Dale Ball
 

Hello All,
This is my first time posting. I've been lurking for a few months, curious to see what birds are about. My husband and I just moved to the Los Osos area less than three weeks ago, from Boulder, CO. We are both avid birders and so of course set out into the trees, dunes, and beaches to see what we could find in our neighborhood.
About a week ago we started seeing and hearing a family of Red-shoulders in the euc grove at the end of Monarch Lane, here in the Monarch Grove subdivision. Last week, on July 30th, about 9am, I witnessed two juveniles and what looked like the two adults swirl about in a noisy melee. Seconds before, one of the juvs was in pursuit of a few barn swallows, snatching at the in the air with its talons and was joined by another juv, and then suddenly there were more small birds ( not swallows) and then one of the adults came on the scene shrieking its approach. Four hawks swirling around grabbing at small birds, all shrieking, and all within 30 feet off the ground. What a show! During that whole time another juvenile quietly watched from a perch over the sandy path. I realized once all the birds quickly dispersed that one hawk had flown up into a tree and was clutching a bird it had caught. Luckily I had my camera so took a few snaps. It was very misty and grey, so not a great shot, but I was thrilled to have seen the show and gotten a picture at all. I am wondering about the victim in the talons..a fledgling Redwing maybe? 
Looking forward to the migration season!
Dale Ball
Los Osos, CA


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Summer Tanager (1 report)
- Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 31, 2020 07:45 by Kaaren Perry
- Toro Creek Rd, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4264066,-120.8442879&ll=35.4264066,-120.8442879
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72012943
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Bird seen in eucs above the road just west of the first bridge. Bright splotchy red and yellow on second summer male. Large yellow bill. Forgot my go-to camera! Back up camera just barely adequate for the situation."

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) (1)
- Reported Aug 01, 2020 07:40 by Mike Stiles
- Yard, 13th St, Los Osos, CA, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3312845,-120.8285379&ll=35.3312845,-120.8285379
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S72008615
- Comments: "Female plumaged grosbeak with dark, prominent streaking across breast. Pale bill. On seed platform for about a minute then gone."

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Turri Road Lesser Yellowlegs

Jim Royer
 

There has been a juvenile Lesser Yellowlegs hanging out with 6-7 Greater Yellowlegs in the first pool on Turri Road (from South Bay Blvd.) for the last 2 hours. It is on the edge closest to Turri Road right now.

Jim Royer
Los Osos


Re: swifts

Lynne Breakstone
 

Here is a recent article from the NYT about Swifts – well written and very informative.
Lynne Breakstone 

On Jul 31, 2020, at 8:47 PM, Thomas Slater via groups.io <tomslaterphotography@...> wrote:

 Lol, I just had my first ever yard WB Nuthatch on Wednesday. Fun! Go Nipomo!
Also had a Peregrine Falcon fly over my house this evening. 




On Friday, July 31, 2020, 6:53 PM, Sue Girard <susansales535@...> wrote:

Late afternoon golden hour visitor, first ever sighting for my yard--a White-breasted Nuthatch (female?). Solid grey back, darker grey narrow crown stripe to forehead, long narrow bill, white face and undersides, brown tinges to wings, brown smudges near vent area. Hung out at my drip emitter-fed ground bird bath, bathed several times and left. Nearest pines are up the street, but have not seen a WBNU in my near neighborhood.  Nice to have a new yard bird as I don't often get off the Ponderosa these days.

Hooded Oriole pair , BHGrosbeak fem's are still here, but have not seen the PS Flycatchers in several days. Had a baby Thrasher pop out from under a shrub and run toward me on the patio yesterday as I was whistling some opera, thought I was his momma? It hung around as I ran through my repertoire from Basie to Baez, then the 'real' Mom appeared with a fat insect and they disappeared under the shrub.

Sue Girard
Nipomo northside


Mobbing Swallows in MB

Rosalie Valvo
 

I was out front talking to a neighbor when I heard a flurry of tweets and saw a flurry of little birds and then a hawk (Red Shouldered?) that flew into a eucalyptus tree.  As soon as the hawk was out of sight, the tweets stopped and the little birds turned out to be swallows that resumed their normal behavior.  Swallows tweeting in flight was a new behavior for me.

 

Rosalie

 


immature Cooper's Harks

Bob Revel
 

We have had a bumper crop of hawks here in Los Osos this year. We live two blocks up from Sweet Springs and have had Immature Red Tails and immature Red Shouldered hawks filling the air with their calls(screeches) for mommy. Lately we have had two immature Cooper’s hawks in our yard, on our fence and in our pine tree. Their high pitched whistles were a surprise to me. This is the first time we have had Immature Cooper’s in our yard. Yesterday, one ate a baby chick on our fence. He/she had to cover the prey because the sibling was nearby. Got some photos on my phone, but not quality to be posted here. So much entertainment during lock down – how could anyone get bored.

Robbie Revel

Los Osos


Re: White Breasted Nuthatch-- new yard list entry

Thomas Slater
 

Lol, I just had my first ever yard WB Nuthatch on Wednesday. Fun! Go Nipomo!
Also had a Peregrine Falcon fly over my house this evening. 




On Friday, July 31, 2020, 6:53 PM, Sue Girard <susansales535@...> wrote:

Late afternoon golden hour visitor, first ever sighting for my yard--a White-breasted Nuthatch (female?). Solid grey back, darker grey narrow crown stripe to forehead, long narrow bill, white face and undersides, brown tinges to wings, brown smudges near vent area. Hung out at my drip emitter-fed ground bird bath, bathed several times and left. Nearest pines are up the street, but have not seen a WBNU in my near neighborhood.  Nice to have a new yard bird as I don't often get off the Ponderosa these days.

Hooded Oriole pair , BHGrosbeak fem's are still here, but have not seen the PS Flycatchers in several days. Had a baby Thrasher pop out from under a shrub and run toward me on the patio yesterday as I was whistling some opera, thought I was his momma? It hung around as I ran through my repertoire from Basie to Baez, then the 'real' Mom appeared with a fat insect and they disappeared under the shrub.

Sue Girard
Nipomo northside


White Breasted Nuthatch-- new yard list entry

Sue Girard
 

Late afternoon golden hour visitor, first ever sighting for my yard--a White-breasted Nuthatch (female?). Solid grey back, darker grey narrow crown stripe to forehead, long narrow bill, white face and undersides, brown tinges to wings, brown smudges near vent area. Hung out at my drip emitter-fed ground bird bath, bathed several times and left. Nearest pines are up the street, but have not seen a WBNU in my near neighborhood.  Nice to have a new yard bird as I don't often get off the Ponderosa these days.

Hooded Oriole pair , BHGrosbeak fem's are still here, but have not seen the PS Flycatchers in several days. Had a baby Thrasher pop out from under a shrub and run toward me on the patio yesterday as I was whistling some opera, thought I was his momma? It hung around as I ran through my repertoire from Basie to Baez, then the 'real' Mom appeared with a fat insect and they disappeared under the shrub.

Sue Girard
Nipomo northside


Oso Flaco Creek mouth

Bob Chapman
 

Just an FYI.

Yesterday I posted that there were "a couple dozen" Elegant Terns in Oso Flaco. When I left the shore in the afternoon yesterday I counted 73, today there was a flock of over 300 and growing.

There are 2 large flocks of gull/tern/pelicans at Oso Flaco Creek mouth along with a boil of bird activity offshore. Definitely worth a look if you're out birding this weekend.

Bob Chapman
Oceano Dunes


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Black-vented Shearwater (1 report)
- Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) (4 reports)
- Summer Tanager (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Black-vented Shearwater (Puffinus opisthomelas) (1)
- Reported Jul 29, 2020 08:30 by Robert Chapman
- Oso Flaco Creek Mouth/Beach, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.0334489,-120.6333643&ll=35.0334489,-120.6333643
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71953675
- Comments: "South Oso Flaco shore watching a light stream of Sooty Shearwaters. A single bird flying apart from sooty's closer to shore. Chunkier than sooty's with a more deliberate flight jizz. White ventral side and a bit smaller."

Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) (Buteo jamaicensis calurus/alascensis) (3)
- Reported Jul 30, 2020 18:47 by Alex Lamoreaux
- 8595–9539 CA-46 E, Paso Robles US-CA 35.65492, -120.52253, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.654922,-120.522532&ll=35.654922,-120.522532
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71970582
- Comments: "Light adults and 1 light-rufous adult"

Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) (Buteo jamaicensis calurus/alascensis) (1)
- Reported Jul 30, 2020 18:53 by Alex Lamoreaux
- CA-46 E, Shandon US-CA 35.66248, -120.38962, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.662478,-120.389622&ll=35.662478,-120.389622
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71970564
- Comments: "Light juvenile"

Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) (Buteo jamaicensis calurus/alascensis) (2)
- Reported Jul 30, 2020 18:55 by Alex Lamoreaux
- Shandon Rest Area, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.6751474,-120.3467005&ll=35.6751474,-120.3467005
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71970571
- Comments: "Light adults"

Red-tailed Hawk (calurus/alascensis) (Buteo jamaicensis calurus/alascensis) (2)
- Reported Jul 30, 2020 18:55 by Lauren diBiccari
- Shandon Rest Area, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.6751474,-120.3467005&ll=35.6751474,-120.3467005
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71970572
- Comments: "Light adults"

Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 30, 2020 08:35 by Will Knowlton
- Toro Creek Rd First Bridge, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4165701,-120.8685276&ll=35.4165701,-120.8685276
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71967661
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Continuing second-year male first found by Tom Edell on July 12, 2020. The bird was observed feeding on bees at the north-west end of the bridge that crosses Toro Creek. Digi-binned photo included."

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Re: Gull

Alvaro Jaramillo
 

Bob

   The interior and northern albertaensis California Gull is theoretically common on the West Coast during the non-breeding season based on banding evidence. The issue is that most individuals are not field separable from the nominate California Gull. On average, albertaensis is larger and paler. The size is perhaps the most reliable feature. Some individuals stand out in flocks in coastal California, but my guess is that the large majority of albertaensis are stealth migrants, totally undetected and undetectable. No clear evidence of wing pattern features exist, but some have thought that albertaensis may be more likely to have an entirely white tip to P10. Maybe, maybe not.

Alvaro

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro@...

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: slocobirding@groups.io <slocobirding@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chapman via groups.io
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 1:01 PM
To: Slocobirding <slocobirding@groups.io>
Subject: [slocobirding] Gull

 

Yesterday I came upon a gull that was a head scratcher. Superficially aligned with California Gull but not quite right; larger, lighter mantle (approaching Herring Gull), bill larger with the gondyle angle more severe. After input from several folks I believe it to be L c. albertaensis, the Northern Great Plains subspecies. I don't have any experience with this race so let me know if you do.

 

The first Black-vented Shearwater showed up yesterday in South Oso Flaco and today I have seen several more.

 

Elegant Terns are MIA at OD this summer but today there are a couple dozen present.

Bob Chapman

Oceano Dunes

 

 


Gull

Bob Chapman
 

Yesterday I came upon a gull that was a head scratcher. Superficially aligned with California Gull but not quite right; larger, lighter mantle (approaching Herring Gull), bill larger with the gondyle angle more severe. After input from several folks I believe it to be L c. albertaensis, the Northern Great Plains subspecies. I don't have any experience with this race so let me know if you do.

The first Black-vented Shearwater showed up yesterday in South Oso Flaco and today I have seen several more.

Elegant Terns are MIA at OD this summer but today there are a couple dozen present.

Bob Chapman
Oceano Dunes



[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Greater White-fronted Goose (2 reports)
- Vaux's Swift (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) (1)
- Reported Jul 29, 2020 17:17 by Norman Pillsbury
- The Lakers (Private - No Public Access), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.515079,-120.672841&ll=35.515079,-120.672841
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71943685
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing."

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) (1)
- Reported Jul 29, 2020 17:17 by Pair of Wing-Nuts
- The Lakers (Private - No Public Access), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.515079,-120.672841&ll=35.515079,-120.672841
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71944583
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing."

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (4)
- Reported Jul 29, 2020 17:17 by Norman Pillsbury
- The Lakers (Private - No Public Access), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.515079,-120.672841&ll=35.515079,-120.672841
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71943685
- Comments: "Identified by call. Small, dark short tailed swift."

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (4)
- Reported Jul 29, 2020 17:17 by Pair of Wing-Nuts
- The Lakers (Private - No Public Access), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.515079,-120.672841&ll=35.515079,-120.672841
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71944583
- Comments: "Identified by call. Small, dark short tailed swift."

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Snowy Egret and Little Blue Heron - juvenile identification

Kaaren Perry
 

While a Little Blue Heron is definitely considered a rarity in SLOCounty there is always the possibility that one just might show up any time!  The last report was from Pismo Creek mouth in November 2019, one in June 2018 at Arroyo Grande Creek mouth and a very few earlier records that I found from 1988 and 2005 in May-August.

The adult plumaged of either species are fairly easy to recognize but the juveniles can be very difficult and often misidentified.  Just in case, some time in the future, you find yourself faced with this challenge I am forwarding a very well constructed summary of how to separate the two species when in juvenile plumage.  Thanks to Ryan Winkleman for posting this to the Orange County Birding for further discussion, reference and distribution. 

Let's go find one!!

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaarenp/

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Subject: [OrangeCountyBirding] Orange County Birding: For Discussing and Sharing Local Bird Info - Digest #704
Date: July 29, 2020 at 6:13:31 AM PDT

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1.Snowy Egrets and Little Blue Herons (4)
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1a. 
Snowy Egrets and Little Blue Herons 
From: Ryan Winkleman
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 08:29:20 PDT 

Like last year, there are suddenly a bunch of reports of juvenile Little Blue Herons in the county. This is a recurring issue. However, Doug Willick, Tom Wurster, Jeff Bray, and I have reviewed the photos that have been submitted online so far and we all feel that these birds are juvenile Snowy Egrets. Here are some field marks to keep in mind for immature (hatch year) individuals of these two species when they are young out of the nest. There is overlap between the two species. Bill color and lore color can show overlap, although on the more extreme ends they are distinctive and easily distinguishable. Leg and feet color can overlap. It is important to keep in mind that juvenile Snowy Egrets that are still young out of the nest will not fit the stereotypical image of a Snowy Egret that we all have, and that lack of typical adult Snowy Egret features does not mean a bird is a juvenile Little Blue Heron. Thanks to Doug and Tom for their feedback on this post.

 

Juvenile Snowy Egret

- Body plumage is all white.

- Bill color ranges from mostly pale with a black tip to mostly black with a pale lower mandible. Birds still in the nest tend to have predominantly black bills, and those that are very young out of the nest, like in July, tend to have very pale bill bases. 

- Bill shape is relatively slim and evenly tapers to a point, although this can be difficult to judge when not seen in juxtaposition.

- Lores are generally NOT bright yellow on young birds, instead often being a pale yellow or greenish-yellow. This can overlap with juvenile Little Blue Herons. Lores turn brighter yellow as the birds age.

- Legs are greenish-yellow and often have black on the front. Lack of black does not mean it is not a Snowy Egret, but presence of black does.

- Feet are dull yellow (turning brighter yellow as the bird ages). If the feet are the same greenish-yellow color as the legs, that does not mean it is not a Snowy Egret, but if the feet appear contrastingly brighter yellow than the legs, it does.

 

Here are some photos of juvenile Snowy Egrets:

 

Juvenile Little Blue Heron

- Body plumage is nearly all white. The tips of the outer primaries are dusky or blue-gray. This feature can sometimes be covered up by the long tertial feathers and requires careful viewing (or for the bird to spread its wings). Because of this, lack of dusky wingtips does not mean it's not a Little Blue Heron, but presence of them does.

- Bill base color is gray, green, or pink on both upper and lower mandibles with a black tip.

- Bill shape is relatively thick and the culmen more abruptly curves downward near the tip, although this is still subtle and again this can be difficult to tell when not seen in juxtaposition with a Snowy Egret.

- Lores are greenish, greenish-yellow, or blue-gray, but never bright yellow.

- Legs and feet are both the same shade of greenish-yellow, never black, and the feet are never brighter yellow than the legs.

 

Here are some photos of juvenile Little Blue Herons:

 

We are also on the early side for juvenile Little Blue Herons, with fall vagrants generally not expected until more like mid- to late August and adults expected in late spring/early summer, although late July for adults is not unprecedented. So please keep in mind that we are in a time of year when juvenile Snowy Egrets are newly emerging off their nests, they look very similar to juvenile Little Blue Herons, and that the burden of proof is on the observer to show--and explain--why any given bird is not a Snowy Egret, keeping in mind that identification of any juvenile Little Blue Heron without clear confirmation of the presence of dusky primary tips is likely to be incorrect, and that juveniles of both species have yellow legs. When diagnostic field marks are not visible, identifications should be made based on multiple features coming together to indicate the probability of one species over the other, and even then, there may be times when a species-specific ID is not possible (although of course one species is way more likely than the other in Orange County).


-- 
Ryan Winkleman
Rancho Santa Margarita

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1b. 
Re: Snowy Egrets and Little Blue Herons 
From: Joe Morlan
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 08:39:44 PDT 

Hi Ryan,

Good summary. I'd like to add that some (up to 20%) juvenile Snowy Egrets
have a decidedly yellow bill with dark tip. See photos and notes here:

https://fog.ccsf.edu/~jmorlan/SnowyEgretP1100155.htm

On Tue, 28 Jul 2020 08:29:07 -0700, "Ryan Winkleman"
<rswinkleman@...> wrote:

Juvenile Snowy Egret

- Body plumage is all white.

- Bill color ranges from mostly pale with a black tip to mostly black with a pale lower mandible. Birds still in the nest tend to have predominantly black bills, and those that are very young out of the nest, like in July, tend to have very pale bill bases.
--
Joseph Morlan, Pacifica, CA

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[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Indigo Bunting (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) (2)
- Reported Jul 28, 2020 17:29 by Becky Newman & James Longley
- Indigo Bunting Stakeout--Quintana Road, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3625791,-120.8167097&ll=35.3625791,-120.8167097
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71914431
- Comments: "Continuing adult male and at least one adult female. Did not see the first-spring male that has been reported."

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Red-breasted Merganser (2 reports)
- Vaux's Swift (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (2)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 19:17 by Sarah Toner
- Santa Maria River Estuary (SLO Co.), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9722359,-120.6456667&ll=34.9722359,-120.6456667
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71888729
- Comments: "Two moving through the water just W of white pelican roost spot. Slim, dark-headed mergansers with fine bills, wispy crests, and no hint of white chin spot. See Santa Barbara co. checklist for photos. Moved into SLO co. as we watched."

Red-breasted Merganser (Mergus serrator) (2)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 19:17 by Larry Chen
- Santa Maria River Estuary (SLO Co.), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9722359,-120.6456667&ll=34.9722359,-120.6456667
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71888730
- Comments: "Two moving through the water just W of white pelican roost spot. Slim, dark-headed mergansers with fine bills, wispy crests, and no hint of white chin spot. See Santa Barbara co. checklist for photos. Moved into SLO co. as we watched."

Vaux's Swift (Chaetura vauxi) (2)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 18:41 by Pair of Wing-Nuts
- Atascadero Wastewater Treatment Ponds--no internal access, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4816927,-120.6434119&ll=35.4816927,-120.6434119
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71889450
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Pair flying together vocalizing. Small, brownish swifts with rapid wing beat and straight trailing wing edges."

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You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Reporting error on today's Villa Creek eBird report.

Maggie Smith
 

I inadvertently posted my report from the field before it was proofed.  I want anyone who saw this report to know I saw NO Lesser Nighthawks this morning at Villa Creek.  Ready for prime time report below:


Maggie Smith
Arroyo Grande
http://www.flickr.com/photos/slomaggie