Date   
Re: Something about Bald Eagles! - sign off!

Kaaren Perry
 

Did it again!  I have an auto sign off and sometimes it disappears when I post to sloco and I don’t catch it.  Sorry.

On Apr 4, 2020, at 3:14 PM, Kaaren Perry <surfbird1@...> wrote:

It is hard to see an adult Bald Eagle without pointing it out to someone!  They are majestic and yes, easy to recognize.  I  find that Whale Rock Reservoir is a good place to occasionally see eagles and yesterday was no exception.

I did not see the adult that Tom Edell told me he had  seen earlier but I did see two immature birds and the plumage was strikingly different.  They were not together when seen, one soaring with a group of Turkey Vultures and the other flying solo.  I have consulted several references, Wheeler, Clark, BNA etc  trying to find out what ages these birds might be. I know we can say “immature”,  “ sub-adult” or even "White-belly 1" etc but I would love to be able to get a little closer to their actual age in years. From what I have read, the term juvenile term relates to 1st year with this species. . Are these two birds the same age but just different plumaged? Both juveniles??  Is there anyone out there that might have more experience aging this species and willing to share some tips that could be referred to in my photos?  

I have put up both birds on my flickr site: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaarenp/

(BTW I do know that adult plumaged  Bald Eagles typically take 5 years to reach adult plumage. :-))

In addition to the eagles, there were also 2 Red-tails, 1 No. Harrier, 1 Cooper's and 1 American Kestral seen during my visit.  It was a lovely, breezy day for raptors.




Something about Bald Eagles!

Kaaren Perry
 

It is hard to see an adult Bald Eagle without pointing it out to someone!  They are majestic and yes, easy to recognize.  I  find that Whale Rock Reservoir is a good place to occasionally see eagles and yesterday was no exception.

I did not see the adult that Tom Edell told me he had  seen earlier but I did see two immature birds and the plumage was strikingly different.  They were not together when seen, one soaring with a group of Turkey Vultures and the other flying solo.  I have consulted several references, Wheeler, Clark, BNA etc  trying to find out what ages these birds might be. I know we can say “immature”,  “ sub-adult” or even "White-belly 1" etc but I would love to be able to get a little closer to their actual age in years. From what I have read, the term juvenile term relates to 1st year with this species. . Are these two birds the same age but just different plumaged? Both juveniles??  Is there anyone out there that might have more experience aging this species and willing to share some tips that could be referred to in my photos?  

I have put up both birds on my flickr site: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaarenp/

(BTW I do know that adult plumaged  Bald Eagles typically take 5 years to reach adult plumage. :-))

In addition to the eagles, there were also 2 Red-tails, 1 No. Harrier, 1 Cooper's and 1 American Kestral seen during my visit.  It was a lovely, breezy day for raptors.



Knot, etc. at Morro Bay State Park Marina

Jim Royer
 

I had a very enjoyable morning of birding at the marina and boardwalk - over 60 species of birds, including 12 species of shorebirds, like Red Knot and Short-billed Dowitcher (which I identified when a Merlin flushed a shorebird flock and the dowitchers called). Shortly after, a Peregrine rocketed over my head and flushed most of the nearby birds. Other highlights included very photogenic breeding-plumaged Horned and Eared Grebes in the harbor. For shorebirding, I had almost all of the birds from the westmost platform next to the boardwalk (near the west end of the peninsula), except for the Spotted Sandpiper which was working the south sandy shore of the harbor. It was nice seeing so many shorebirds and other birds that will soon be gone. One of the Yellow-crowned Night Herons was still present on one of the boats in the marina.

Jim Royer
Los Osos

Nipomo Regional Park

Thomas Slater
 

I did the outside loop through the northern more wild part of the park (no pavement, few people, oaks and scrub). It was average until I reached the highest point in the park (and maybe in Nipomo). Spring migration was hanging out...
Nashville Warbler
OC Warblers
Black-throated Gray warblers
Townsend's Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Yellow Rumped Warblers
Warbling Vireo
Nesting Hutton's Vireos
and Band-tailed Pigeons.

Full report here...

Bird on,

Tom Slater
Nipomo

Re: Yard Bird

Tom Ogren
 

First brightly colored male Western Tanager in my SLO yard this morning.

-----Original Message-----
From: Brad Schram <gonebrdn@...>
Sent: Apr 3, 2020 6:08 PM
To: slocobirding <slocobirding@groups.io>
Subject: [slocobirding] Yard Bird Surprise & Calliope

A modest number of birds in migration northward over Deer Canyon, Arroyo
Grande this morning.  With the notable exception of one group of three
birds, all were typical for the date here.

The exception was truly exceptional, leaving me sputtering in surprise
as they disappeared northward over the ridge.  If, after my twenty years
here at Deer Canyon, you asked me what I thought my next new yard bird
would be I'd probably say something like "Blue Grosbeak" or maybe
"Common Yellowthroat".  However, as is often true in the realm of
rare--or in this case, out-of-place--birds, I would never have thought
of including WILSON'S PHALAROPE on the possible list here in the dry
hills, oaks and chaparral.  And yet, there they were flying in binocular
range across my field of view, above eye level as they disappeared
northward.  It's a bit early for them to be moving northward along the
coastal plain, but there they were.

At about eleven AM a male CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD appeared at the feeders,
dodging the Rufous and Anna's multitudes.  It returned a few times to
the feeders, but I've not seen it again since about 11:20.  Our first
here this spring.

I saw neither Calliope nor Wilson's Phalarope in my five mile radius
count here in calendar year 2019.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande




Yard Bird Surprise & Calliope

Brad Schram
 

A modest number of birds in migration northward over Deer Canyon, Arroyo Grande this morning.  With the notable exception of one group of three birds, all were typical for the date here.

The exception was truly exceptional, leaving me sputtering in surprise as they disappeared northward over the ridge.  If, after my twenty years here at Deer Canyon, you asked me what I thought my next new yard bird would be I'd probably say something like "Blue Grosbeak" or maybe "Common Yellowthroat".  However, as is often true in the realm of rare--or in this case, out-of-place--birds, I would never have thought of including WILSON'S PHALAROPE on the possible list here in the dry hills, oaks and chaparral.  And yet, there they were flying in binocular range across my field of view, above eye level as they disappeared northward.  It's a bit early for them to be moving northward along the coastal plain, but there they were.

At about eleven AM a male CALLIOPE HUMMINGBIRD appeared at the feeders, dodging the Rufous and Anna's multitudes.  It returned a few times to the feeders, but I've not seen it again since about 11:20.  Our first here this spring.

I saw neither Calliope nor Wilson's Phalarope in my five mile radius count here in calendar year 2019.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande

[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Snow Goose (1 report)
- Greater White-fronted Goose (1 report)
- Long-tailed Duck (1 report)
- Calliope Hummingbird (2 reports)
- Green-tailed Towhee (2 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
- Reported Apr 03, 2020 07:33 by Jeff Miller
- Morro Bay SP--Marina/Boardwalk Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3445235,-120.8418006&ll=35.3445235,-120.8418006
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66569178
- Comments: "Continuing"

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) (1)
- Reported Apr 03, 2020 13:08 by Bradley Hacker
- Atascadero Wastewater Treatment Ponds--no internal access, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.4816927,-120.6434119&ll=35.4816927,-120.6434119
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66586016
- Comments: "Pale goose. Orange bill."

Long-tailed Duck (Clangula hyemalis) (1)
- Reported Apr 03, 2020 10:24 by Mike Bush
- Baywood Pier, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3267517,-120.841246&ll=35.3267517,-120.841246
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66580748
- Comments: "A rather stout duck seen flying low over water with linear black and white markings. Long tail very noticeable."

Calliope Hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) (1)
- Reported Apr 03, 2020 07:35 by Jim Royer
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66575042
- Comments: "Male, first one in the neighborhood! At a feeder. Very small short tailed hummer with dark red streaks of color in the throat - quite unlike any other North American hummer. This was a first for this neighborhood, as far as I know. It was coming to a feeder, but I have been unable to get a photo."

Calliope Hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) (1)
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 19:15 by Jeri Edwards
- stagecoach property, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1387443,-120.5614262&ll=35.1387443,-120.5614262
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66556671
- Comments: "Continuing. Smallest hummingbird - and clearly stands out at feeder - streaked gorget that barely showed magenta close to sunset"

Green-tailed Towhee (Pipilo chlorurus) (1)
- Reported Apr 03, 2020 06:40 by Jeri Edwards
- stagecoach property, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1387443,-120.5614262&ll=35.1387443,-120.5614262
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66585398
- Comments: "Still showing up at sunrise"

Green-tailed Towhee (Pipilo chlorurus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 06:40 by Jeri Edwards
- stagecoach property, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1387443,-120.5614262&ll=35.1387443,-120.5614262
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66554440
- Comments: "Continuing. One of the first birds out around sunrise."

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OD

Bob Chapman
 

Lunch break.

Migration this week has been impressive and curious. Three days ago 1000+ California Gulls flew past and today I've seen fewer than 10. 

Although, today the shorebirds continue; individual flocks of 10-50 or more Western Sandpipers have been steady all morning. Well over a 1000 have gone past. A Dunlin here and there mixed in but no white rumps. Dang.

6 Red-necked Phalaropes in AG Creek lagoon is the highlight so far. Also:

8 Greater Yellowlegs
9 Short-billed Dowitchers (flock of 38 yesterday)
1 American Pipit

Bob Chapman
Oceano Dunes

P.S. Yesterday I photographed perhaps the biggest Peregrine Falcon I've ever seen. A sub-adult female the size of a male red-tailed hawk. Very nice bird.


New migrants

Thomas Slater
 

44 species on my daily loop, one off the record, and dipped on mourning dove!

BUT I did get a Black-headed Grosbeak, Hermit Thrush, Scaly-breasted Munias, Hooded Orioles, Lawrence's Goldfinch, and a fly-over Northern Shoveler, among others. Warblers are scarce. 

full list here with a picture of the Grosbeak

Tom Slater
Nipomo

Re: Rufous Hummingbirds along the coast

 

This is the first year since I've been here (Nov 2017) that I've seen rufous/Allen's at my feeders in Paso Robles! One rufous male and at least one female for the past week. Still have a pair of Anna's too.

Cindy McIntyre
207-522-4664 cell

Calliope Hummingbirds in Atascadero

Kevin Zimmer
 

Along with the large numbers of Selasphorus (presumed Rufous) hummingbirds which have spiked over the past week at our feeders, we are now getting a few Calliope Hummingbirds.  Our first one was a female yesterday (April 1) afternoon.  This morning at around 9:00 a.m. we briefly had a male.  No more sightings, despite much attention, until about 4:15 p.m., when I photographed a female at one of our feeders.  Then, between 5:20 and 5:45 p.m., a male visited the feeders several times, and I was able to get several documentary photos.  The Calliopes are not having an easy time of it, because there are so many typically aggressive adult male Rufous (at least 8–12 adult males, and probably 25-40 female/imm male Selasphorus that I assume are Rufous, since we seldom get any confirmed Allen’s Hummingbirds this far inland) that are just hammering any other hummingbird attempting to feed.

I’ve been hearing Warbling Vireos singing in the neighborhood for the past few days, and lots of House Wrens, Orange-crowned Warblers and Pacific-slope Flycatchers singing everywhere.  Female Bullock’s Orioles and Black-headed Grosbeaks have arrived here and joined the males, which have been on site for the last two weeks.  I also had a female Phainopepla just down the street today.

Still good numbers of Pine Siskins at our feeders, although American Goldfinches and Purple Finches have been mostly missing in action (compared to normal) for the entire month of March.  Our 3 wintering White-throated Sparrows are still hanging in, and one or more of them can frequently be heard singing from the vicinity of Graves Creek in the afternoon. 

Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero

Rufous Hummingbirds

Karen Clarke
 

I am replying to the question about Rufous Hummingbirds. I haven’t noticed any in my backyard, but today I saw a little group of Rufous Hummingbirds, while walking the Moonstone Beach boardwalk in Cambria. There were two to four.

Karen Clarke
Cambria

Life is an adventure, enjoy it!

Re: Rufous Hummingbirds along the coast

Tom Ogren
 


I've been seeing a male Allen's Hummingbird almost daily for several weeks now in my SLO yard, and about a week ago I started seeing Rufous daily too. Fun to see 'em!

Tom Ogren  SLO

-----Original Message-----
From: Joanne Aasen
Sent: Apr 2, 2020 6:26 PM
To: Kaaren Perry
Cc: Slocobirding
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Rufous Hummingbirds along the coast

They are up in numbers in Cambria also. I’ve had 3 males at my feeders. 
Walking across an empty lot a half-block away I saw 2 males chasing each other.  
Maybe they are the same ones that come to my feeders.  
The last Rufous I have in my house records was MAR/APR 2018. 

Joanne Aasen
Cambria, CA

On Apr 2, 2020, at 6:06 PM, Kaaren Perry <surfbird1@...> wrote:

I am wondering if others are seeing a noticeable increase of male Rufous Hummers in the past few days along the coast.  

Today I would estimate 8-10 males seen at any one time as they circled my feeders and the nearby Pride of Madera bushes.   4 male Allen’s and 5-7 selasphorus females.  There easily could have been more, especially Rufous as they zoomed about, often in hot pursuit of each other. Admittedly these numbers are my attempt at estimating at a single given time.

I know that birders who live inland often report good numbers of selasphorus hummers but I don’t usually see this many at one time in our yard in Morro Bay.  Maybe my being home all day has something to do with it? 

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay




Re: Rufous Hummingbirds along the coast

Joanne Aasen
 

They are up in numbers in Cambria also. I’ve had 3 males at my feeders. 
Walking across an empty lot a half-block away I saw 2 males chasing each other.  
Maybe they are the same ones that come to my feeders.  
The last Rufous I have in my house records was MAR/APR 2018. 

Joanne Aasen
Cambria, CA

On Apr 2, 2020, at 6:06 PM, Kaaren Perry <surfbird1@...> wrote:

I am wondering if others are seeing a noticeable increase of male Rufous Hummers in the past few days along the coast.  

Today I would estimate 8-10 males seen at any one time as they circled my feeders and the nearby Pride of Madera bushes.   4 male Allen’s and 5-7 selasphorus females.  There easily could have been more, especially Rufous as they zoomed about, often in hot pursuit of each other. Admittedly these numbers are my attempt at estimating at a single given time.

I know that birders who live inland often report good numbers of selasphorus hummers but I don’t usually see this many at one time in our yard in Morro Bay.  Maybe my being home all day has something to do with it? 

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay




Re: Rufous Hummingbirds along the coast

Victoria Morrow
 

Absolutely!  I have three rufous/Allen’s consistently in my yard in Avila Beach and saw one today on the Bob Jones Trail for the first time in the nine years I have been loving here.  What a treat they all are!

Vicki 

On Apr 2, 2020, at 6:06 PM, Kaaren Perry <surfbird1@...> wrote:

I am wondering if others are seeing a noticeable increase of male Rufous Hummers in the past few days along the coast.  

Today I would estimate 8-10 males seen at any one time as they circled my feeders and the nearby Pride of Madera bushes.   4 male Allen’s and 5-7 selasphorus females.  There easily could have been more, especially Rufous as they zoomed about, often in hot pursuit of each other. Admittedly these numbers are my attempt at estimating at a single given time.

I know that birders who live inland often report good numbers of selasphorus hummers but I don’t usually see this many at one time in our yard in Morro Bay.  Maybe my being home all day has something to do with it? 

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay



Lesser Yellowlegs

Jim Royer
 

The closed section of State Park Road, just off South Bay Blvd., is birdy. At midday today, I had 3 Greater Yellowlegs and one Lesser Yellowlegs flying around the slough next to the road, for a nice comparison of size, bills and calls. Closer to South Bay Blvd., 2 just-arrived Black-headed Grosbeaks we’re singing, along with Wilson’s Warbler, Pac.-slope Flycatchers, and Rufous Hummingbirds (feeding on twin berry flowers).  It’s really nice with no traffic. The Snow Goose continues on the nearby bay, seen from South Bay Blvd.

Jim Royer
Los Osos

Rufous Hummingbirds along the coast

Kaaren Perry
 

I am wondering if others are seeing a noticeable increase of male Rufous Hummers in the past few days along the coast.  

Today I would estimate 8-10 males seen at any one time as they circled my feeders and the nearby Pride of Madera bushes.   4 male Allen’s and 5-7 selasphorus females.  There easily could have been more, especially Rufous as they zoomed about, often in hot pursuit of each other. Admittedly these numbers are my attempt at estimating at a single given time.

I know that birders who live inland often report good numbers of selasphorus hummers but I don’t usually see this many at one time in our yard in Morro Bay.  Maybe my being home all day has something to do with it? 

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay



[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Snow Goose (2 reports)
- Greater White-fronted Goose (1 report)
- Vaux's Swift (Vaux's) (1 report)
- Calliope Hummingbird (1 report)
- Tropical Kingbird (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 13:01 by Jim Royer
- Morro Bay State Park, Los Osos US-CA (35.3440,-120.8255) South Bay Blvd., San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.344015,-120.825509&ll=35.344015,-120.825509
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66543877
- Comments: "Continuing bird, with 2 Canadas"

Snow Goose (Anser caerulescens) (1)
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 09:03 by David Cox
- Park Ridge Trail Parking Area (use for viewing estuary), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3414123,-120.8237954&ll=35.3414123,-120.8237954
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66533337
- Comments: "With Canada geese"

Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons) (4)
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 06:56 by Maggie Smith
- Bob Jones Trail, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1886907,-120.7193907&ll=35.1886907,-120.7193907
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66536326
- Comments: "adults with white around pinkish bill; bright orange legs hanging with Canada Geese on golf course."

Vaux's Swift (Vaux's) (Chaetura vauxi vauxi) (1)
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 08:30 by Tom Slater
- Pajaro Lane Loop, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.018773,-120.5092185&ll=35.018773,-120.5092185
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66536796
- Comments: "One flying high with tree swallows. Wings were noticeably narrower and sharper, and were swept back, visibly different from the tree swallows. It was slightly smaller than swallows. Light brown, small body with slightly paler throat was obvious next to the white bodies of the swallows. I watched it from afar, and then as it slowly got lower and closer to me until it flew directly over my head with a spectacular view. There may have been more but I was so focused on this one and keeping it in my bins that by the time I looked up into the sky again, the swallow flock had moved away from me. Very fun sighting, new bird for my daily walk."

Calliope Hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) (1)
- Reported Apr 02, 2020 09:00 by Jacqueline Knowlton
- Corner of Shiloh Pl. and Bethel Road, Templeton, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.5566955,-120.7257825&ll=35.5566955,-120.7257825
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66533649
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Smaller than other hummingbirds, striped gorget"

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Apr 01, 2020 17:38 by Grace Romero
- Department of State Hospitals - Atascadero, Atascadero US-CA 35.46138, -120.63278, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.461384,-120.632776&ll=35.461384,-120.632776
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S66515760
- Comments: "Perched at top of last tree in State Hospital parking lot. large kingbird body shape and vocalizations. Entire belly and chest yellow. Tail all dark."

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Oceano lake/lagoon area 4/2irs

Rubba Johanna
 

Birded the Oceano lake on the south side of Pier Ave., then checked out Norswing & Coolidge street-side trees and vegetation.

Norswing & Coolidge
Birds seen:
Common Yellowthroat
Song Sparrow
Yellow-rumped warbler in breeding plumage
Southwestern YR warbler in breeding plumage*
RC Kinglet
Bushtit 
Pied-billed Grebe
Gadwall
Junco

*This bird had a bright yellow throat, large, solid black patches on the chest (not streaked), yellow along the shoulder, more white in the wings than our local type, broken black streaks in the underparts. The tail was notched, from underneath the tip was black but the remainder white. I did not catch sight of the back, crown or rump. It was fluttering among the trees around the entrance to the lagoon path.

Birds heard:
Purple Finch
Wrentit
Red-shouldered Hawk
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-backed Chickadee
Marsh Wren
Junco

Birds at the lake:
Snow goose continuing
Many Great-tailed Grackles, male and female
Double-crested Cormorant, proudly displaying his white "ear" feathers
Male Ruddy Duck in breeding plumage

There was another lump of white nestled on a hump of reed roots. It was large, maybe larger than the Snow Goose, so perhaps some domestic goose. But its head was tucked in and coots were sitting behind it, blocking a better view.

I forgot to report a sighting from last Saturday, when I walked the Grover Beach boardwalk and the Pismo campground next to the butterfly grove. There were ponds and streamlets in the campground as a result of the recent rains. One largish pond hosted eight Cinnamon teal, 6 male and 2 female.

Johanna Rubba
Grover Beach

looking up

Thomas Slater
 

So looking up today paid off.
I saw a single Vaux's Swift mixed it with some high flying Tree Swallows.
I saw a female Hooded Oriole scouting out a palm tree, hopefully for a nesting site, with a male perched nearby.
Lawrence's Goldfinch today was in the same spot, with one additional female nearby. I also saw another male/female pair on a different street as well. 
Bird on,

Tom Slater
Nipomo