Date   

Oceano - Black & White Warbler

Steve McMasters
 

A large mixed flock right near the trail (that winds along north side of the lagoon ) entry from Pier Ave contained all the expected warbler species plus chickadees, kinglets, and bushtits and a BLACK & WHITE WARBLER.

Steve McMasters
SLO


Poss. Kentucky Warbler - Oceano Dunes SVRA

n1lovefool@...
 

A possible male KENTUCKY WARBLER was reported by our staff this afternoon in one of the isolated vegetated islands closed off by the seasonal nesting exclosure. Our staff went out later to photograph this bird but were not able to relocate it. Written description available upon request. We will be keeping an eye out for this bird as we continue our normal monitoring activities.


A WILLOW FLYCATCHER was also observed moving through these islands and the YELLOW-GREEN VIREO persisted today on the peninsula in Oceano Campground.


Exciting birding at the Dunes!



Sarah Stratton

Atascadero, CA


Yellow-green Vireo still there today 5:00pm - 6:00pm

mitchpefa
 

Good chance the bird will still be there in the morning


Mitch Siemens

Arroyo Grande, CA.


North Coast - Van Gordon Rd.

Kaaren Perry
 

This morning Bart, Karen Beckman and I decided to head up the coast for a morning of birding.  Getting out of the fog was a bit of a challenge and our first good stop was Arroyo Laguna.  More shorebirds there than I have seen in a while with the most attractive being several juvenile Sanderlings. (photo)

With the fog lifting we returned to Van Gordon Rd. heading north a short distance where various species of raptors were beginning to move around the area.   8 Species were observed: White-tailed Kites, juvenile Northern Harriers, juvenile Coopers Hawk (photo), Red-shouldered Hawk, Red-tailed Hawks, American Kestrels, Prairie and Peregrine Falcon. Lots of interaction  between several of the bird species.  What a great place to study our raptors in winter!  Soon after the fog had lifted and sky cleared, the birds dispersed.

A little bit farther up the road we found 2 immature gamblii White-crowned Sparrows.  (photo) These are migrants in our county, recently returning for the winter months.  (first seasonal arrival in my yard today)

No Pectoral Sandpipers at the San Simeon Creek Evaporation pond.  Killdeer were the only shorebird present.


Yellow Green Vireo

njmann90
 

Still present at Oceano St. Park foraging in oaks at end of peninsula by owl boxes and downed pine.  Also had a yellow warbler among the usual suspects. Thank you Dave, Maggie, and Herb.
Nancy Mann, SLO

--
Nancy Jean Mann
San Luis Obispo
njmann50@...

"A duck a day!!!!"  William Henry "Hank" Deveraux, Jr.'


'I've seen so much stupid in my years that I can't remember all of it,'  2014 James Turner.






Vireo Oceano Campground

Roger Zachary
 

The Yellow-green Vireo is present this morning on the peninsula at Oceano. Looking at it now.

Roger Zachary
Atascadero


Yellow-green vireo etc.

Thomas Slater
 

I left it at about 6:30 so it was still in the same place. Still solitary.

I hit the Peninsula at about 5:20 but after two rounds didn't see the bird.
I was beginning to get that "man I suck at this" feeling.
Then Phil (Will's buddy from Humbolt) showed up. We combined our efforts.
Shortly after I saw the vireo fly in from the willows and into the oaks.
Phew, I don't suck. We later pointed it out to Ross's dad.

It did exactly what others said. Stayed deep in the oaks, but wasn't very shy.
It made brief appearances (but rarely in the nice golden light).

Shout out to Roger, fun bird to see again! I hope Ruth was there when you found it!

Other than that I mainly saw Townsend's Warblers, one Orange, one Common Yellowthroat, and a couple Yellow Warblers. Saw one Pac-slope. Still waiting for a Bay-breasted...

Yesterday, up on the Mesa, during our Cross Country practice my son pointed out about 7 Vaux's Swifts.
The rest of the team was wondering what Owen and I were staring at that was so intriguing.

Good luck if you try for the Vireo tomorrow,
Bird on,

Tom Slater - Nipomo




Re: Yellow-green Vireo at Oceano Campground

Thomas Slater
 

I refound the vireo at about 5:40. Right where it's been all day. Nice job keeping tabs on this bird!
Bird on
Tom Slater

Sent from Tom's iPhone 😎

On Sep 15, 2016, at 4:24 PM, Kevin Zimmer kjzimmerphd@... [slocobirding] <slocobirding-noreply@...> wrote:

The Yellow-green Vireo found by Roger and Ruth Zachary was still at Oceano Campground as of 3:10 p.m.

I saw the 2 posted messages at 1:15, hopped in the car, made it to the campground by 2:00 p.m., and by 2:15 I was looking at the bird. The vireo was not associating with a flock during the ca. 1 hour that I was tracking it, which mades it easy to overlook. It was foraging mostly in a couple of bushy oaks near a huge prostrate pine near the tip of the peninsula (there is a bench just west of the big pine), not far north of the bat boxes. The bird was generally confiding, allowing close approach, but tended to forage in the shaded and somewhat tangled interior of the trees, making it difficult to photograph. I heard no vocalizations during my time with the bird. Also, on 3 occasions, the vireo managed to just vanish from a tree that it was methodically working for several minutes, and each time, it took me several minutes to relocate it in another tree.

I did get several decent photos — not sure if Roger and Ruth photographed it or not. Thanks to them for finding this good bird (a county bird for me — I was in Brazil when the last one was found a few years ago) and for getting the word out!

The campground was pretty quiet while I was there, although it was pretty much a surgical strike on the vireo for me. I did see an Empid that was pretty clearly a “Western” (Pac-slope/Cordilleran) type, and there was a small flock with a few Townsend’s and Yellow warblers — all on the Peninsula as well.

Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero

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Yellow-green Vireo at Oceano Campground

William Bouton
 

I did get several images of the very confiding Yellow-green Vireo at Oceano Lagoon peninsula. Several can be viewed at:


Roger and I were shooting side-by-side for over an hour and I’m sure he’ll be putting up images also.

Bill







Begin forwarded message:

From: "Kevin Zimmer kjzimmerphd@... [slocobirding]" <slocobirding-noreply@...>
Subject: [slocobirding] Yellow-green Vireo at Oceano Campground
Date: September 15, 2016 at 4:24:24 PM PDT
Cc: Kevin Zimmer <kjzimmerphd@...>
Reply-To: Kevin Zimmer <kjzimmerphd@...>

The Yellow-green Vireo found by Roger and Ruth Zachary was still at Oceano Campground as of 3:10 p.m.

I saw the 2 posted messages at 1:15, hopped in the car, made it to the campground by 2:00 p.m., and by 2:15 I was looking at the bird.  The vireo was not associating with a flock during the ca. 1 hour that I was tracking it, which mades it easy to overlook.  It was foraging mostly in a couple of bushy oaks near a huge prostrate pine near the tip of the peninsula (there is a bench just west of the big pine), not far north of the bat boxes.  The bird was generally confiding, allowing close approach, but tended to forage in the shaded and somewhat tangled interior of the trees, making it difficult to photograph.  I heard no vocalizations during my time with the bird.  Also, on 3 occasions, the vireo managed to just vanish from a tree that it was methodically working for several minutes, and each time, it took me several minutes to relocate it in another tree.

I did get several decent photos  — not sure if Roger and Ruth photographed it or not.  Thanks to them for finding this good bird (a county bird for me — I was in Brazil when the last one was found a few years ago) and for getting the word out!

The campground was pretty quiet while I was there, although it was pretty much a surgical strike on the vireo for me.  I did see an Empid that was pretty clearly a “Western” (Pac-slope/Cordilleran) type, and there was a small flock with a few Townsend’s and Yellow warblers — all on the Peninsula as well.

Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero













Yellow-green Vireo at Oceano Campground

Kevin Zimmer
 

The Yellow-green Vireo found by Roger and Ruth Zachary was still at Oceano Campground as of 3:10 p.m.

I saw the 2 posted messages at 1:15, hopped in the car, made it to the campground by 2:00 p.m., and by 2:15 I was looking at the bird. The vireo was not associating with a flock during the ca. 1 hour that I was tracking it, which mades it easy to overlook. It was foraging mostly in a couple of bushy oaks near a huge prostrate pine near the tip of the peninsula (there is a bench just west of the big pine), not far north of the bat boxes. The bird was generally confiding, allowing close approach, but tended to forage in the shaded and somewhat tangled interior of the trees, making it difficult to photograph. I heard no vocalizations during my time with the bird. Also, on 3 occasions, the vireo managed to just vanish from a tree that it was methodically working for several minutes, and each time, it took me several minutes to relocate it in another tree.

I did get several decent photos — not sure if Roger and Ruth photographed it or not. Thanks to them for finding this good bird (a county bird for me — I was in Brazil when the last one was found a few years ago) and for getting the word out!

The campground was pretty quiet while I was there, although it was pretty much a surgical strike on the vireo for me. I did see an Empid that was pretty clearly a “Western” (Pac-slope/Cordilleran) type, and there was a small flock with a few Townsend’s and Yellow warblers — all on the Peninsula as well.

Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero


Shell Beach Bluffs 9/15

Brad Schram
 

An hour spent on the bluffs in Shell Beach this morning revealed many rafts and swirling flocks of BLACK-VENTED SHEARWATERS just offshore. It's hard to suggest the number of birds in these combined flocks, but I wouldn't be surprised if anywhere between 10 & 15K birds were present. It was quite a scene. A few score ELEGANT TERNS worked up and down the coast as well, although no jaegers were seen. HEERMAN'S GULLS and BRANDT'S CORMORANTS were present, a few hundred of the former (no sub-adults, although I did have a second-cycle bird yesterday) and a few thousand of the latter. SOOTY SHEARWATERS were only present in ones and twos initially, although a weak but consistent trickle of Sooties began moving upcoast between the Black-vent flocks by the time I left.

Sea Otters singly and in small groups were visible near the shearwater rafts both upcoast and down. No whales or dolphins were present.

Stops at a few stands of cypress and ornamentals along the Shell Beach bluffs produced no passerine migrants.

Brad Schram

Arroyo Grande


Oceano Vireo

Roger Zachary
 

Yellow-green Vireo now at Oceano on peninsula.

Roger and Ruth Zachary
Atascadero


Yellow-green Vireo, Pismo State Beach Oceano Campground, 9/15

Tom Edell
 

This morning around 9:15 Roger Zachary found one on the end of the peninsula near the bat house.

 

Serving as the messenger.

 

Tom Edell

Cayucos, CA

 


Oceano Lagoon, 9/14

Tom Edell
 

I birded the Oceano campground and lagoon this morning with Cammy Shields and Pam Wood. A nice variety of birds, though nothing especially rare.  Vaux’s Swifts were feeding over the area the entire time I was there with a high count of 18 early in the morning. I saw two White-crowned Sparrows around the lagoon, one that was a Gambel’s type. Never saw the Tennessee if it was there.

 

Tom Edell

Cayucos, CA

 


Re: American Crow song??

Tom Edell
 

I heard this exact call once back in the early 1990’s during the SLO County breeding bird atlas. I was with Sarah Carty near the Hearst Castle parking lot. We both though it sounded like a child calling “mom-ma.…mom-ma” several times. I’ve never heard like it since then. Interesting that it was not a one-off occurrence.



Tom Edell

Cayucos, CA



From: slocobirding@... [mailto:slocobirding@...] On Behalf Of Chris Van Beveren becktravel@... [slocobirding]
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:50 PM
To: Kaaren Perry <surfbird1@...>; yahoogroups <slocobirding@...>
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] American Crow song??








I hear that sound in my yard often. Did not notice where it was coming from. It sounds like cuh coh with accent on the second syllable.



Chris Van Beveren
Beck Travel
565 Baywood Way

Los Osos CA 93402

Phone: 805 439-2023
Fax: 805 439-2042

becktravel@...



_____

From: "Kaaren Perry surfbird1@... [slocobirding]" <slocobirding-noreply@...>
To: yahoogroups <slocobirding@...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:20 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] American Crow song??





While birding at Sweet Springs in Los Osos on September 7 I heard a strange wavering “cooing" sound that I could not readily identify. It was coming from high in the eucalyptus trees where a large flock of American Crows were “cawing” and moving about. I heard it sporadically over about 5 minutes. At first I thought it was some sort of owl being bothered but the circumstances seemed odd for an owl to be calling and it really didn't sound like any owl that I knew. After finally tracking down the source I found it to be an American Crow. The sound was being produced as it just sat on a branch.



I was able to get a short recording of the sound along with the more common “ caw caw” using my iPhone. I am including an ebird link to the sound clip since attachments cannot be included on slocobirding.



http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31580426



We know that the American Crow has many sounds but I do not remember ever hearing this before and am thinking it may be of interest to others. Can it be classified as a song? Maybe everybody has heard it but me??



Kaaren Perry

Morro Bay

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaarenp/


cassin's vireo

njmann90
 

Today around 4 p.m. had a Cassin's Vireo in the Coast Live Oak tree next door.  Near Vet's Hall, SLO.  Cassin's Kingbird numbers (3 or 4 now?) appear to be increasing at Cuesta College.
NJ Mann

--
Nancy Jean Mann
San Luis Obispo
njmann50@...

"A duck a day!!!!"  William Henry "Hank" Deveraux, Jr.'


'I've seen so much stupid in my years that I can't remember all of it,'  2014 James Turner.






Re: American Crow song??

Bonnie Thompson
 

I've also heard crows making that sort of cooing sound, though maybe not that exact sound--at Sweet Springs on work-party days and a few months ago near my house. Interestingly, the crow making a cooing sound near my house was doing it in front of a house where a woman kept white doves, and I thought maybe the crow had learned to imitate the doves.

--Bonnie Thompson
Los Osos

On Wed, Sep 14, 2016 at 12:20 PM, Kaaren Perry surfbird1@... [slocobirding] <slocobirding-noreply@...> wrote:


While birding at Sweet Springs in Los Osos on September 7  I heard a strange wavering “cooing" sound  that I could not readily identify. It was coming from high in the eucalyptus trees where a large flock of American Crows were “cawing” and moving about.  I heard it sporadically over about 5 minutes.  At first I thought it was some sort of owl being bothered but the circumstances seemed odd for an owl to be calling and it really didn't sound like any owl that I knew. After finally tracking down the source I found it to be an American Crow. The sound was being produced as it just sat on a branch.  

I was able to get a short recording of the sound along with the more common “ caw caw” using my iPhone. I am including an ebird link to the sound clip since attachments cannot be included on slocobirding.


We know that the American Crow has many sounds but I do not remember ever hearing this before and am thinking it may be of interest to others.  Can it be classified as a song?  Maybe everybody has heard it but me??  
















Re: American Crow song??

Chris Van Beveren
 

I hear that sound in my yard often. Did not notice where it was coming from. It sounds like  cuh coh  with accent on the second syllable.
 
Chris Van Beveren
Beck Travel
565 Baywood Way
Los Osos CA 93402
Phone:  805 439-2023
Fax:  805 439-2042
becktravel@...



From: "Kaaren Perry surfbird1@... [slocobirding]"
To: yahoogroups
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2016 12:20 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] American Crow song??

 
While birding at Sweet Springs in Los Osos on September 7  I heard a strange wavering “cooing" sound  that I could not readily identify. It was coming from high in the eucalyptus trees where a large flock of American Crows were “cawing” and moving about.  I heard it sporadically over about 5 minutes.  At first I thought it was some sort of owl being bothered but the circumstances seemed odd for an owl to be calling and it really didn't sound like any owl that I knew. After finally tracking down the source I found it to be an American Crow. The sound was being produced as it just sat on a branch.  

I was able to get a short recording of the sound along with the more common “ caw caw” using my iPhone. I am including an ebird link to the sound clip since attachments cannot be included on slocobirding.


We know that the American Crow has many sounds but I do not remember ever hearing this before and am thinking it may be of interest to others.  Can it be classified as a song?  Maybe everybody has heard it but me??  















American Crow song??

Kaaren Perry
 

While birding at Sweet Springs in Los Osos on September 7  I heard a strange wavering “cooing" sound  that I could not readily identify. It was coming from high in the eucalyptus trees where a large flock of American Crows were “cawing” and moving about.  I heard it sporadically over about 5 minutes.  At first I thought it was some sort of owl being bothered but the circumstances seemed odd for an owl to be calling and it really didn't sound like any owl that I knew. After finally tracking down the source I found it to be an American Crow. The sound was being produced as it just sat on a branch.  

I was able to get a short recording of the sound along with the more common “ caw caw” using my iPhone. I am including an ebird link to the sound clip since attachments cannot be included on slocobirding.


We know that the American Crow has many sounds but I do not remember ever hearing this before and am thinking it may be of interest to others.  Can it be classified as a song?  Maybe everybody has heard it but me??  













south county update

Kevin Zimmer
 

Bill Rucci and I spent the morning birding Oceano Campground, Oso Flaco Lake and driving the beach at Oceano Dunes.  Highlights below (by location):

Oceano Campground:

We worked the chickadee-bushtit flocks pretty carefully, with the only rarity being a Tennessee Warbler (north end of the campground, west of the lagoon).  I estimated 10 Wilson’s Warblers, 8+ Townsend’s Warblers, 6 Yellow Warblers, 2 Orange-crowned Warblers, at least 3 Warbling Vireos, and 1 Hutton’s Vireo moving with the rather diffuse flock.

We also saw 2 White-crowned Sparrows, 2 Western Bluebirds and an Osprey, along with most of the usual suspects at this location and date.


Oso Flaco:

The Reddish Egret was present throughout our stay, and was working both sides of the boardwalk.  Sora and Virginia rails were very vocal and visible — we saw 3 Virginia Rails and 2 Soras, and heard twice as many of each from various corners of the lake.  We also had a sub-adult Peregrine Falcon (with a very full crop) make a pass over the lake.  No sign of any Least Terns.

The willows between the lake and the parking area had a chickadee-bushtit flock that included 1 female Hermit Warbler (photographed), as well as 1 Warbling Vireo, 2 Hutton’s Vireos, 8+ Wilson’s Warblers (some of these were still singing), and a few each of Orange-crowned and Yellow Warblers.  

We had the pleasure of meeting Herb Elliott along the path, and he reported having seen a Tennessee Warbler in one of the flocks.

Oceano Dunes:

3 Common Terns (photographed), 90+ Elegant Terns, 2 Caspian Terns, 2 Royal Terns were the highlights.  Sadly, of more than 350 Heermann’s Gulls present, we did not see a single juvenile bird, suggesting yet another year of breeding failure.  Lots of Whimbrels and Marbled Godwits on the beach, but only 2 Willets and 1 Snowy Plover seen during our somewhat cursory visit.  There were lots of shearwaters streaming past offshore, but all were too distant to do much with.

Kevin Zimmer
Atascadero

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