Date   

Ruff continues @ AG Creek Mouth 8/31

Maggie Smith
 

The female juvenile Ruff continues at the mouth of Arroyo Grande Creek .  It's in the same area where it was first seen 26 Aug by Curtis Marantz and Brian Daniels. Viewing is best from the beach looking back into the lagoon in the vicinity of the largest stand of reeds.  The Solitary Sandpiper was NOT seen today.  The habitat is good for shorebirds.

Stopped by Oceano County Pond.  The adult Snow Goose and the Cackling Goose are still there with the ragtag domestic geese.

Oceano Campground was busy with the resident Chestnut-backed Chickadees.   Had a calling Ruby-crowned Kinglet in the pines west of the campground and a male Black-throated Gray Warbler in the willows along the Norswing, Coolidge side of the lagoon. 

Maggie Smith
Arroyo Grande
http://www.flickr.com/photos/slomaggie


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


North Coast shorebirds

Kevin Zimmer
 

I checked several spots along the North Coast for shorebirds today (8/30). Several of the creek mouths were either completely dry or unproductive. San Simeon Creek mouth had 15-20 Western Sandpipers, 35 Red-necked Phalarope and 6 Least Sandpipers. Estero Bluffs had scattered groups of shorebirds feeding in beached kelp, including 6 Short-billed Dowitchers (all juveniles), 3 Baird's Sandpipers (all juvs), 5 Least Sanpipers (all juvs) and 80+ Black Turnstones. One Red-necked Phalarope was feeding in the water just off the beach. One Wandering Tattler (an alternate-plumaged adult) and 6 Black Oystercatchers were scattered over the nearshore rocks.

At most stops, Killdeer, Spotted Sandpiper, Willet, Whimbrel, Long-billed Curlew and Marbled Godwit were present in good numbers.

The Harlequin Duck was still present at Estero Bluffs.

Kevin Zimmer (Atascadero)


Montana de Oro SP/8/30

Maggie Smith
 

Kaaren Perry and I poked around the mouth of Islay Creek  and Spooner Cove Campground.  Of minor note, we had a male Black-headed Grosbeak in the willows at Islay Creek.  Neither of us have seen one for over a month.

A Red-breasted Nuthatch called in the campground.  According to eBird it's a rare bird now.

I'm ready for fall migration.
 
Maggie Smith
Arroyo Grande
http://www.flickr.com/photos/slomaggie


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Cuyama River Solitary Sandpiper

Peter Gaede
 

Hi All:

This evening there was a SOLITARY SANDPIPER along the river approximately 1 mile northeast of the USFS Pine Canyon Station along Hwy 166. I walked down to the riverbed where there was some standing water near a pull-out just past Mile Marker 26 (+35.0433°, -120.1829°), and flushed the bird a short distance to the north as I walked upstream.

Peter Gaede
Santa Barbara


Cuesta Canyon Park

Tom Ogren
 

Birded Cuesta Canyon Park yesterday afternoon....looking for a Hairy Woodpecker for my son-in-law. Didn't find it but did see Acorn and Downey Woodpeckers, and a new first bird for him, a bright Wilson's Warbler (in a California Bay tree).
The day before we did a big day and came up with 78 species....we hit Pismo, Oceano, the Carizzo Plain. Birds of note were one Greater Roadrunner, a Prairie Falcon, a Golden Eagle, Sage Sparrows, and an Orange-crowned Warbler.

Tom Ogren
SLO


Marine Mammals

douglas.overman
 

Announcing a new Yahoo group dedicated to reporting marine mammals sightings along the San Luis Obispo coastline.

It can be found at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/slomarinemammals

The idea of this group is to provide timely alerts to members regarding marine mammal sightings. The recent Humpback Whale display is a good example, but I think that members would appreciate updates regarding sightings that many of us may regard as commonplace. Examples could be the status of Sea Otters in Morro Bay and Elephant Seals at Piedras Blancas.

Hopefully, members will not have to wait until the six o'clock news to find out about exciting viewing opportunities along our coast.

I have obtained permission to post an off topic subject as this new group is likely to be of interest to many members of slocobirding.

Doug Overman
Cayucos


MCAS Field Trip San Simeon State Park

Maggie Smith
 

Nine eager and inquisitive birders hiked the 3.3 mile loop this beautiful fog free morning.

We worked hard but finally got good looks at Pygmy Nuthatches.  With them was a female Red-breasted Nuthatch.  This year Red-breasted nuthatches have been scarce to none in SLO County.  Hopefully  this presages their return for the remaining part of this year.

A Brown Creeper gave us a good sight lesson by showing how it only climbs up a tree and never climbs down.  Instead it flies down to the bottom of another tree and repeats the process.

Two Townsend's Warblers (1 a bright male) gave everyone great looks as they hawked insects.  We were close enough to hear their bills clicking as they fed.

We had 44 species.


Maggie Smith
Arroyo Grande
http://www.flickr.com/photos/slomaggie


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Bairds Sandpiper (6) Turri Ponds

Kaaren Perry
 

At a 3.2 high tide this morning 6 Bairds Sandpipers made a brief appearance at the ponds on Turri Rd. before crossing the road and flying over to the bay. All the ponds at that time were full.

This morning a juvenile Lesser Yellowlegs was feeding in the wet area near Baywood pier in Baywood.

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay
http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaarenp/


Sunday birding; Pismo Lake

jojo7272001
 

Went out Sunday to Avila in hopes of seeing whales, but they have departed. Did see two red-throated loons near the boat lift. Otherwise, the usual suspects.

Birding elsewhere very quiet.

I went to Turri Road and saw a small number of red-necked phalaropes, but no sandpipers. i returned later, in the early evening, and saw sandpipers, but they were too far away to nail, and dusk was coming on. I suspect they were Baird's, because, in flight, they had a trilling call as described in my field guide. Can anyone verify the call? Do any other sandpipers or plovers trill? There were also 3-4 killdeer.

Stopped by the overlook in the late afternoon. Saw, I think, a largish group of marbled godwits, a few wiliets, and may be a yellowlegs. Some sandpipers, but, again, too far to ID. Then went to Sweet Springs and saw little egrets and a few more wiliets. On the walk back to the car, got a wonderful view of an osprey perched atop some bare branches.

I live in Grover Beach, so I often drive up 4th St. and look at Pismo Lake. I've always wondered if there is access to the Lake. I looked on Google Maps satellite view, and found a trail that goes from the railroad tracks by the butterfly trees to the lake. I don't know if it's private property or not. Just south of Sky River RV, on Rte. 1 across from the big Pismo beach campground, there is a dirt lot on the east side of the road. There are two openings onto the tracks -- one has a "Private Property" sign, and the other does not. The other, correct path has an MCI cable warning post (orange) between the trees and the tracks (north of the "property" sign). The trail picks up again across the tracks by the bridge over the creekbed. It's a nice, clear path, and not a long walk to the lake. Good riparian birding along the way. Does anyone know whether it is permitted to boat on the lake? It usually looks kind of scummy, but it might be a nice place to look for birds.

When I arrived, I saw another osprey taking wing over the butterfly trees. Beautiful!

Johanna Rubba
Grover Beach


Harlequin Duck/Estero Bluffs/8/28

Maggie Smith
 

Donna Chance and I started birding from the Fig Tree parking area at Estero bluffs.  The male Harlequin Duck is molting and looks brighter but is not as advanced as the male Harlequin Duck north of the Cayucos Pier.

Very notable was a count of 17 White-tailed Kites which included 2 juveniles that were actively hunting, sitting on the ground and atop coyote bushes.

We also saw an adult Wandering Tattler and 1 Ruddy Turnstone.
 
Maggie Smith
Arroyo Grande
http://www.flickr.com/photos/slomaggie


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Bernardo Alps
 

Hi Michael.

We are comparing apples and oranges here, since for the Arctic Tern we are looking at the distance between summering and wintering areas and for the Sooty Shearwater we are looking at the actual "ground" covered by individual birds. The distance between the North Island of New Zealand and the Gulf of Alaska is just over 7,000 miles as the crow flies. I imagine that the terns fly in a more direct line than the shearwaters, but it would be great if someone deployed satellite tags on that species as well.

Take care,

Bernardo

-----Original Message-----
From: "Michael T. Hanson" <mthanson@calpoly.edu>
Sent: Aug 28, 2012 7:45 AM
To: Bernardo Alps <whalephoto@earthlink.net>
Cc: slocobirding <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Thanks. The Arctic Tern is often touted as making a round trip of 24,000 miles. Actually, it would be less than this as it is 12,000 miles from pole to pole and since it does not go all the way to either pole, it would have to be less than this.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bernardo Alps" <whalephoto@earthlink.net>
To: "slocobirding" <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 2:17:52 PM
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion






The answer is 39,000 miles, http://currents.ucsc.edu/06-07/08-14/shearwaters.asp.


Take care,


Bernardo


Bernardo Alps
Whalephoto@earthlink.net
San Pedro, CA


-----Original Message-----
From: "Michael T. Hanson"
Sent: Aug 27, 2012 10:13 AM
To: Richard Boyd
Cc: slocobirding
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Would seem unlikely as I suspect there are several flocks. The migration of Sooty Shearwaters is one of those great biological wonders that gets no play. In some ways they may give competition to Arctic Terns which are touted as having the longest migration of any species, going from Arctic regions to Antarctic and back again. Sooties, after finishing their breeding in the Australian/New Zealand area, make a swing across the Pacific to South America, then up the west cost of the Americas up into our coast; then continue north into the north eastern Pacific along the North American west coast, across the Pacific to Asia, then returning south along the western Pacific back to their breeding grounds from whence they started. The distance they cover? I'll leave it to you to figure out.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Boyd" < dickboyd@charter.net >
To: "slocobirding" < slocobirding@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2012 4:31:50 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Yesterday's Invasion of Sooty Shearwaters off of the Morro Bay
sandspit was Truly Awesome!. It was much better described as
a dense cLoud than a Flock. These eruptions seem to
come on a regular basis, involve huge distances (Global in scale)
and appear to occur in several species of Shearwaters. This the second
one that I have seen here.

There has been concern that this behavior could be counter productive
in that an untoward event such as a storm could destroy
a significant fraction of the specie's world population and cause it
to become endangered or even erased.

Time will tell

Dick Boyd



Re: Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Thomas P. Malone
 

Both are gorgeous birds whose flights are feats of wonder. I was fortunate to visit Churchill Canada this June and see the Terns on their nesting grounds. They are magnificent, pugnacious birds who contend every day with the hordes of Parasitic jaegers bedeviling them.

I've seen the Sooty's since 1962 and marvel at the life of a bird who, like the tern, spends most of its life at sea. I look forward to renewing my friendship every fall during visits to California.

Thanks for these fabulous and informative posts.

Regards,

Tom Malone
Minnetonka Minnesota



Thomas P. Malone
Attorney at Law
Barna Guzy & Steffen
Minneapolis Minnesota
tmalone@bgs.com
(Via BlackBerry)

________________________________

From: slocobirding@yahoogroups.com <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
To: Bernardo Alps <whalephoto@earthlink.net>
Cc: slocobirding <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tue Aug 28 09:45:19 2012
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion




Thanks. The Arctic Tern is often touted as making a round trip of 24,000 miles. Actually, it would be less than this as it is 12,000 miles from pole to pole and since it does not go all the way to either pole, it would have to be less than this.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bernardo Alps" <whalephoto@earthlink.net <mailto:whalephoto%40earthlink.net> >
To: "slocobirding" <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com <mailto:slocobirding%40yahoogroups.com> >
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 2:17:52 PM
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

The answer is 39,000 miles, http://currents.ucsc.edu/06-07/08-14/shearwaters.asp.

Take care,

Bernardo

Bernardo Alps
Whalephoto@earthlink.net <mailto:Whalephoto%40earthlink.net>
San Pedro, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: "Michael T. Hanson"
Sent: Aug 27, 2012 10:13 AM
To: Richard Boyd
Cc: slocobirding
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Would seem unlikely as I suspect there are several flocks. The migration of Sooty Shearwaters is one of those great biological wonders that gets no play. In some ways they may give competition to Arctic Terns which are touted as having the longest migration of any species, going from Arctic regions to Antarctic and back again. Sooties, after finishing their breeding in the Australian/New Zealand area, make a swing across the Pacific to South America, then up the west cost of the Americas up into our coast; then continue north into the north eastern Pacific along the North American west coast, across the Pacific to Asia, then returning south along the western Pacific back to their breeding grounds from whence they started. The distance they cover? I'll leave it to you to figure out.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Boyd" < dickboyd@charter.net <mailto:dickboyd%40charter.net> >
To: "slocobirding" < slocobirding@yahoogroups.com <mailto:slocobirding%40yahoogroups.com> >
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2012 4:31:50 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Yesterday's Invasion of Sooty Shearwaters off of the Morro Bay
sandspit was Truly Awesome!. It was much better described as
a dense cLoud than a Flock. These eruptions seem to
come on a regular basis, involve huge distances (Global in scale)
and appear to occur in several species of Shearwaters. This the second
one that I have seen here.

There has been concern that this behavior could be counter productive
in that an untoward event such as a storm could destroy
a significant fraction of the specie's world population and cause it
to become endangered or even erased.

Time will tell

Dick Boyd


Re: Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Michael Hanson
 

Thanks. The Arctic Tern is often touted as making a round trip of 24,000 miles. Actually, it would be less than this as it is 12,000 miles from pole to pole and since it does not go all the way to either pole, it would have to be less than this.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Bernardo Alps" <whalephoto@earthlink.net>
To: "slocobirding" <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 2:17:52 PM
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion






The answer is 39,000 miles, http://currents.ucsc.edu/06-07/08-14/shearwaters.asp.


Take care,


Bernardo


Bernardo Alps
Whalephoto@earthlink.net
San Pedro, CA


-----Original Message-----
From: "Michael T. Hanson"
Sent: Aug 27, 2012 10:13 AM
To: Richard Boyd
Cc: slocobirding
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Would seem unlikely as I suspect there are several flocks. The migration of Sooty Shearwaters is one of those great biological wonders that gets no play. In some ways they may give competition to Arctic Terns which are touted as having the longest migration of any species, going from Arctic regions to Antarctic and back again. Sooties, after finishing their breeding in the Australian/New Zealand area, make a swing across the Pacific to South America, then up the west cost of the Americas up into our coast; then continue north into the north eastern Pacific along the North American west coast, across the Pacific to Asia, then returning south along the western Pacific back to their breeding grounds from whence they started. The distance they cover? I'll leave it to you to figure out.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Boyd" < dickboyd@charter.net >
To: "slocobirding" < slocobirding@yahoogroups.com >
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2012 4:31:50 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Yesterday's Invasion of Sooty Shearwaters off of the Morro Bay
sandspit was Truly Awesome!. It was much better described as
a dense cLoud than a Flock. These eruptions seem to
come on a regular basis, involve huge distances (Global in scale)
and appear to occur in several species of Shearwaters. This the second
one that I have seen here.

There has been concern that this behavior could be counter productive
in that an untoward event such as a storm could destroy
a significant fraction of the specie's world population and cause it
to become endangered or even erased.

Time will tell

Dick Boyd


Re: Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Bernardo Alps
 

The answer is 39,000 miles, http://currents.ucsc.edu/06-07/08-14/shearwaters.asp.


Take care,


Bernardo


Bernardo Alps
Whalephoto@earthlink.net
San Pedro, CA

-----Original Message-----
From: "Michael T. Hanson"
Sent: Aug 27, 2012 10:13 AM
To: Richard Boyd
Cc: slocobirding
Subject: Re: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion





Would seem unlikely as I suspect there are several flocks. The migration of Sooty Shearwaters is one of those great biological wonders that gets no play. In some ways they may give competition to Arctic Terns which are touted as having the longest migration of any species, going from Arctic regions to Antarctic and back again. Sooties, after finishing their breeding in the Australian/New Zealand area, make a swing across the Pacific to South America, then up the west cost of the Americas up into our coast; then continue north into the north eastern Pacific along the North American west coast, across the Pacific to Asia, then returning south along the western Pacific back to their breeding grounds from whence they started. The distance they cover? I'll leave it to you to figure out.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Boyd" <dickboyd@charter.net>
To: "slocobirding" <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2012 4:31:50 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Yesterday's Invasion of Sooty Shearwaters off of the Morro Bay
sandspit was Truly Awesome!. It was much better described as
a dense cLoud than a Flock. These eruptions seem to
come on a regular basis, involve huge distances (Global in scale)
and appear to occur in several species of Shearwaters. This the second
one that I have seen here.

There has been concern that this behavior could be counter productive
in that an untoward event such as a storm could destroy
a significant fraction of the specie's world population and cause it
to become endangered or even erased.

Time will tell

Dick Boyd


Amazing bird and whale phenomena

Rouvaishyana <rouvaishana@...>
 

Greetings to Docents, Audubon members, and local birders,



Sat. 8/25 we ran 4 whale watch trips and 2 private charters in the ocean
waters off Morro Bay. The sea was calm all day. On all trips we saw
several Humpback whales lunge-feeding and engaging in other showy
behaviors, within a few miles of the Morro Bay harbor mouth. Along with
the whales was an immense flock of Sooty shearwaters, resembling a swarm
of insects and at times resembling a hurricane as the birds flew in wide
circles searching for food. There must have been several hundred
thousand birds, and perhaps nearly a million. In years past, I have
seen flocks of this species numbering in the tens of thousands, and at
another time a living river of them that I estimated at 110,000 but this
is the largest single flock of this bird (or any bird species) I have
ever seen. Indeed, the migration of Sooty shearwaters ranks as one of
the great wildlife migrations in the world, though it is not widely
known. Other species of shearwaters, and sometimes other seabirds,
associate with these mass migrations and associated feeding stopovers.
Along with them were Brown pelicans, multiple species of gulls, and
other seabirds more commonly seen off our coast, such as Common murre,
Brandt's cormorant, and Red-necked phalarope. On one trip we saw
Bottlenose dolphins riding the bow wave of the boat as well.



Many people have also reported seeing similar phenomena off Avila Beach,
Shell Beach, at the Pismo pier, and other coastal locations in the last
several days to a week or more. The SLO Tribune reported crowds of
people going to Avila Beach to observe wildlife from shore on Fri. 8/24,
and I hope many of you had the opportunity to see it.



Also on Sat. 8/25, while leading a kayak excursion inside the bay, we
observed a large number of Caspian terns plunge-diving. There were also
White pelicans on shore, Marbled godwits, 2 species of egrets, and
others including Double-crested cormorants and multiple gull species.





On Sun. 8/26, we ran 5 whale-watching trips to take advantage of the
proximity of all this wildlife. Humpback whales and shearwaters (these
in smaller but still impressive numbers) were still close to the Morro
Bay harbor mouth. Whales were breaching, lobtailing, slapping the water
with their long flippers, and engaging in other show-off behavior.
Birds were very active. By afternoon, all species began to move farther
offshore and away from the harbor entrance, presumably because they had
begun to deplete their prey of schooling fish (sardines, anchovies,
etc.), shrimp, other crustaceans, and whatever else was in the water
that was nutritious for them. Also the wind began to pick up in the
afternoon, the ocean became rougher, and by the late afternoon and
evening trips, there were fresh breezes (16-20 knots) and many
whitecaps, making it more difficult both to spot whales and to close the
distance to them.





This underscores the fact that these phenomena are Transient Wildlife
Spectacles, a non-technical term I coin for them here. In this way,
they are similar to the feeding frenzies of birds and marine mammals
that occur in Morro Bay, in ocean waters off the coast, and elsewhere.
If one wants to observe these first-hand, it is necessary to get
information quickly and go where they are happening without delay. In
some cases, these events may last for several hours or even a few days,
but in others they may last only an hour or so, or even less. Avid
birders know that if they want to spot a rare bird that shows up in an
unexpected place, they must go there as soon as the occurrence is
reported or risk missing the opportunity.





At any rate, the great spectacle had dissipated and moved offshore as of
the evening of 8/26, but it could recur. Please keep your eyes open and
send out reports if it does.



Thanks and best wishes,

Rouvaishyana
MB Museum of Natural History


Oso Flaco

Brad Schram
 

Oso Flaco was lovely this morning. Not much of note bird-wise, but lovely. A few each Yellow and Wilson's warblers amongst the Bushtits and chickadees. One juv. Least Tern remains on the bridge railing, calling and being fed by an adult.

The bad news...the remains (feathers) of two Least Terns on the railings--one adult, one juv. My guess is that a Cooper's Hawk, or possibly an early Merlin going through, picked off a couple easy marks for breakfast.

Brad Schram
Arroyo Grande


Re: Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Michael Hanson
 

Would seem unlikely as I suspect there are several flocks. The migration of Sooty Shearwaters is one of those great biological wonders that gets no play. In some ways they may give competition to Arctic Terns which are touted as having the longest migration of any species, going from Arctic regions to Antarctic and back again. Sooties, after finishing their breeding in the Australian/New Zealand area, make a swing across the Pacific to South America, then up the west cost of the Americas up into our coast; then continue north into the north eastern Pacific along the North American west coast, across the Pacific to Asia, then returning south along the western Pacific back to their breeding grounds from whence they started. The distance they cover? I'll leave it to you to figure out.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Boyd" <dickboyd@charter.net>
To: "slocobirding" <slocobirding@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, August 26, 2012 4:31:50 PM
Subject: [slocobirding] Sooty Shearwater Invasion







Yesterday's Invasion of Sooty Shearwaters off of the Morro Bay
sandspit was Truly Awesome!. It was much better described as
a dense cLoud than a Flock. These eruptions seem to
come on a regular basis, involve huge distances (Global in scale)
and appear to occur in several species of Shearwaters. This the second
one that I have seen here.

There has been concern that this behavior could be counter productive
in that an untoward event such as a storm could destroy
a significant fraction of the specie's world population and cause it
to become endangered or even erased.

Time will tell

Dick Boyd


Turri and Pecho Rds. 8-26

Thomas Slater
 

Saw the Forster's Tern today off Pecho Rd. above the bay. Thanks Beedie.
Also saw dozens and dozens of Red-necked Phalaropes and two Baird Sandpipers at the Turri Pond today around 4pm.
Thanks for posting people!

 
Tom Slater
Slater Photography
(805)-441-6945
slatervision.com

http://www.flickr.com/photos/28154077@N02/

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Sooty Shearwater Invasion

Richard Boyd
 

Yesterday's Invasion of Sooty Shearwaters off of the Morro Bay sandspit was Truly Awesome!. It was much better described as a dense cLoud than a Flock. These eruptions seem to come on a regular basis, involve huge distances (Global in scale) and appear to occur in several species of Shearwaters. This the second one that I have seen here.

There has been concern that this behavior could be counter productive in that an untoward event such as a storm could destroy
a significant fraction of the specie's world population and cause it to become endangered or even erased.

Time will tell

Dick Boyd


Los Osos-MDO 26 August

Mike Stiles
 

I hit a few places this morning. At Pecho Willows I had my first of fall YELLOW WARBLER.

At the mouth of Islay Creek in Montana de Oro, I had another Yellow Warbler, and two female LAZULI BUNTINGS.

In the campground near the ampitheatre I had my first TOWNSEND'S WARBLER of the fall.

While I was out, my wife had a female BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK at the feeder.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos

10081 - 10100 of 20826