Date   

[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Tropical Kingbird (2 reports)
- Vesper Sparrow (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Sep 20, 2020 10:31 by Mark Mushkat
- Santa Rosa Creek mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.5683274,-121.1102353&ll=35.5683274,-121.1102353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73841568
- Comments: "Found by Tom Edell this morning. In tidal pool below parking lot."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Sep 20, 2020 08:26 by Jeff Miller
- Santa Rosa Creek mouth, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.5683274,-121.1102353&ll=35.5683274,-121.1102353
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73826678
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Found by Tom Edell; photos"

Vesper Sparrow (Pooecetes gramineus) (2) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 07:00 by Peter Gaede
- Cuyama--Highway 33/166 ag pond, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=34.9188041,-119.5132256&ll=34.9188041,-119.5132256
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73798845
- Comments: "Flushed from edge of agricultural pond into bare dirt field next to pond for good viewing. Medium-sized sparrows with thin complete eye rings. Distinct face pattern with dark bordered auriculars and contrasting whitish malar. Streaked upper breast. Dark patch on upper wing coverts."

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Re: Pectoral Sandpiper, Tropical Kingbird, Santa Rosa Creek Mouth

Tom Edell
 

Northern Parula in dense riparian habitat  along Windsor Ave, west of bridge. Fair number of passerines in area this morning. 

Tom Edell 
Cayucos, CA 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Tom Edell via groups.io" <TEdell@...>
Date: 9/20/20 7:48 AM (GMT-08:00)
To: SLO Bird Listserv <slocobirding@groups.io>
Subject: [slocobirding] Pectoral Sandpiper, Tropical Kingbird, Santa Rosa Creek Mouth

Both now below the parking lot  on the north side of the creek mouth.

Tom Edell 
Cayucos, CA 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


--

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA
--

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA


Pectoral Sandpiper, Tropical Kingbird, Santa Rosa Creek Mouth

Tom Edell
 

Both now below the parking lot  on the north side of the creek mouth.

Tom Edell 
Cayucos, CA 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


--

Tom Edell
Cayucos, CA


North American Birds

svlrchrd
 


I have subscribed since 1984.  Always interesting, for instance (on the link) Southern CA - Summer 2017 , Roger Zachary photo of Red-necked Stint at Arroyo Laguna , SLO.

Meanwhile at the house , the spider I've been talking to since March finally told me her name.  A tiny voice so I had to get real close.  Sounded like Sandra or Linda, but no it is Spindra.

Some sections are blocked unless subscriber.  Many reports remain to be  put up, but reports are catching up.

Best regards,
Rick Saval
Avila Beach


A clarification

mike stiles
 

There seemed to be a little consternation from some that my previous post about giving up my county birding website, was referencing this listserv. I realize that both are called SLOCOBIRDING, hence the confusion was warranted.

This listserv is not going away, and I will remain the moderator. I had another site with county listers, 400 club, etc that will no longer be hosted. I have been contacted already and some of that old website may still find life.

Stay tuned.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Common Gallinule (1 report)
- Chestnut-sided Warbler (1 report)
- Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (1 report)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Common Gallinule (Gallinula galeata) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 18, 2020 13:25 by Petra Clayton
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73761393
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing from eBird report on 8/8/20 (Rick Saval). --- Coot-iike, gray body, blackish head, brown back, white undertail coverts, white edging along flanks, candy-corn-colored bill: bright red with yellow tip, the red rising shield-like into forehead; greenish-yellow legs. ---

Click on the image below for a Flickr video, showing the Common Gallinule along the edge of the lagoon across from campsite #17: (video to be added)"

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1)
- Reported Sep 19, 2020 10:06 by Jim Royer
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73787359
- Comments: "Continuing bird with faint chestnut sides"

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (Setophaga coronata auduboni) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 18, 2020 12:18 by Jeff Miller
- Islay Creek Campground--Montana de Oro SP, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2736118,-120.8838502&ll=35.2736118,-120.8838502
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73750051
- Comments: "Pale yellow throat, yellow rump, white eye arcs"

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


San Luis Obispo County Birding website

mike stiles
 

The SLO County birding website I managed for many years, is going away. Cal Poly no longer will host the site, and I don't have the skills or the desire to move it to another hosting site, pay for it, and maintain it. If anyone is interested in taking it over, it's all yours.

The url is: https://web.calpoly.edu/~mstiles/slobird.html    but I'm not even sure it's visible to the public. I can still see it sometimes, but mostly I get a "site not available" notification. I can probably save the html coding to pass along if someone is interested. I even own the "slocobirding.org" domain name I can pass along (sell).

Please respond to me personally, and not to this list. Thanks.

Mike Stiles
Los Osos


Pecho Chestnut-sided

Jim Royer
 

The Chesnut-sided Warbler continues at Pecho Willows this morning. It was on the Pecho Road side of the willows, with a bushtit flock five minutes ago.

Jim Royer
Los Osos


Los Osos misc.; help with ID?

Rubba Johanna
 

Hit Los Osos high spots today--Pecho Rd., Sweet Springs, Audubon overlook, Turri Rd. Brief visit each.

Pecho Rd.: Waders along the bay edge. Willets, Marbled Godwits, 1Killdeer, 1 Long-billed Curlew, and a mystery bird. Could not get close enough for a real good look, but--it was a shorebird smaller than a Godwit but bigger than a peep; chubby. Very short, black bill--way shorter than Short-billed Dowitcher. Bill was somewhat thick and blunt. Legs looked black, but it was late afternoon. White underneath. The wings were beige and seemed to be barred with vertical bars. The head was somewhat dark, with the eye and area around the eye very dark. It was by itself, feeding among the other waders.

Sweet Springs: walked the boardwalk to the lookout bench. Counted upwards of 150 waders in the shallows, mostly in silhouette. A look through the scope on the platform showed Willets and Marbled Godwits, at the least.

Audubon overlook: practically nothing to see. Quail heard in nearby bushes.

Turri Rd ponds: 11 Red-necked Phalaropes, judging by dark markings on the head. In the westerly ponds.

Johanna Rubba
Grover Beach

 


No rare birds to report but LOTS of Hummingbird 09.18.20

Cheryl Lish
 

Did have a Black-headed grosbeak at my backyard feeder very briefly yesterday and the day prior.  Can only say it was not an adult male.

From late July till early Sept the hummers were consuming 3 1/2 gallons of sugar water per day. Unfortunately I didn't document the day but with the onset of smoke blanketing this area, consumption jumped in one day to 6 gallons.  That only lasted 3 days but has continued at 5 1/2 gallons per day for about the past 10 days.
I suspect the fires to the north have pushed hummers here. 
99% Anna's Hummingbirds, still have a couple female and/or juv Black-chinned, saw an adult male BLCH yesterday 9/17. Certain I also heard a Costa's yesterday... need to spend a bit more time watching.

I'm not noticing an increase in seed feeder consumption.  
As postings about migrating birds have suggested I too am concerned about how birds handle the fire and smoke {when we're being told to stay in doors). Wondering / worrying about "my" White-crowned & Golden-crowned Sparrows who should be showing up any day.

I have had larger than usual numbers of Goldfinch (mostly Lesser), House finches, and Lark Sparrows - but they were here prior to the fires.  I attribute their numbers to the California native vegetation that they're feeding on in the field to the south of my house. Better than a hundred birds take flight periodically from the tarweed (uncertain of ssp) and Croton setiger (dove weed/turkey mullin) - mostly early morning and evening. Makes my little heart happy. 
I'm not seeing flocks flying up from the field to the north... and I suspect it's because that field is full of non native vegetation. :( 

I'm also noticing far fewer than usual Eurasian Collared Doves.  They were still abundant (~15 - 20) when someone posted asking if people were noticing fewer numbers.  I'm now only seeing 2, sometimes a 3rd one. I do know the first year female Cooper's Hawk (and her parents) have been responsible for removing a few. 
Cheryl Lish  Arroyo Grande


[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Vermilion Flycatcher (7 reports)
- Tropical Kingbird (4 reports)
- Yellow-rumped Warbler (4 reports)
- Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (3 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 15:11 by David Lawrence
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73728804
- Media: 5 Photos
- Comments: "Small, active fly catcher with gray back/head, black primaries with faint white outline, pink/salmon vent/abdomen/chest giving way to white neck/throat, faintly streaked. Black line through eye. Small patches of bright red appearing on head. Photos."

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 14:22 by Kilian Hampl
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725615
- Media: 8 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird first reported by Mike Bush. Patches of red on the head, with red underparts. Heard the bird calling in flight after being chased off by a Phoebe. First found by campsite 48. Flew around from campsites 45-57. Then re-found at campsite 56. Photos."

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 14:22 by Liam Hampl
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725613
- Media: 8 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird first reported by Mike Bush. Patches of red on the head, with red underparts. Heard the bird calling in flight after being chased off by a Phoebe. First found by campsite 48. Flew around from campsites 45-57. Then re-found at campsite 56. Photos."

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 13:15 by Nick Belardes
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73719025
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird spotted earlier in the day. First-year bird with pinkish underside, with white splotches mixed in on chest. Had some pinkish in crown and on one of its cheeks. Similar to phoebe in behavior, flying from post to ground, back to post, and sometimes to tops of bushes and trees, or a kiosk sign, always diving to ground and back to perch. Pics for ID."

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 12:45 by Jeanette Stone
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73722507
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "First reported this morning by Mike Bush. Immature male with with patchy red on head and underparts."

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 09:05 by Kelly Cherry
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73713392
- Media: 9 Photos
- Comments: "orangish belly with white upper chest, see pics"

Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) (1)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 15:28 by Mark Mushkat
- Pismo State Beach - Oceano Campgrounds, Oceano US-CA 35.10654, -120.62688, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.10654,-120.626881&ll=35.10654,-120.626881
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73720742
- Comments: "Found by Mike Bush this morning. Young male showing nicely around campsites 56-80. M. Ob."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 14:22 by Liam Hampl
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725613
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird first reported by Jeff Miller and Tom Edell. Green back, bright yellow underside. First saw the bird around campsite 53. Then re-found at campsite 52. Photos."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 14:22 by Kilian Hampl
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725615
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing bird first reported by Jeff Miller and Tom Edell. Green back, bright yellow underside. First saw the bird around campsite 53. Then re-found at campsite 52. Photos."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 13:15 by Nick Belardes
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73719025
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Large kingbird. Bright yellow underside and most of breast. Gray throat and head. White cheek patch. Long black bill. Was talking to Jeanette Stone near campsite #56 when I spotted the bird fly into tree along lake. See Jeanette Stone checklist for pic ID."

Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 12:45 by Jeanette Stone
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73722507
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Previously reported: Brighter underparts (yellow extends to throat) and larger bill than Western or Cassin's."

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) (2)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 16:00 by Jim Royer
- Islay Creek Campground--Montana de Oro SP, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2736118,-120.8838502&ll=35.2736118,-120.8838502
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725422
- Comments: "2 Audubon’s Yellow-rumps calling in the cypress trees, one seen - dull fall grayish-brown bird with yellow rump, light yellowish in throat, slight yellow on sides."

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (Setophaga coronata auduboni) (1)
- Reported Sep 18, 2020 11:25 by Kaaren Perry
- Lila Keiser Park/Morro Creek, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3777661,-120.856743&ll=35.3777661,-120.856743
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73749200
- Comments: "Bird appeared to be a fall female. Pale yellow throat, faint streaking on the sides of breast, white belly, yellow rump. Dull brownish upperparts plumage. Clear look at the bird as it moved about, sometime hawking for insects. Seen in the cypress trees near the parking lot. It was being persistently heckled by an Anna's Hummingbird."

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (Setophaga coronata auduboni) (1)
- Reported Sep 18, 2020 07:17 by Jeff Miller
- Lila Keiser Park/Morro Creek, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3777661,-120.856743&ll=35.3777661,-120.856743
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73737259
- Comments: "Pale yellow throat, yellow rump, white eye arcs"

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) (1)
- Reported Sep 18, 2020 06:53 by Jeff Miller
- Morro Strand State Beach, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3982858,-120.8678892&ll=35.3982858,-120.8678892
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73736029
- Comments: "Audubons"

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Audubon's) (Setophaga coronata auduboni) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 07:18 by Maggie Smith
- Oso Flaco Lake (not for beach/ocean), San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.0302072,-120.6207848&ll=35.0302072,-120.6207848
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73720820
- Comments: "over all drab brownish bird with yellow throat and rump"

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) (5)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 14:22 by Kilian Hampl
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725615
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Photos. 3 out of the 5 YRWA were at the tree with the placard, along the trail. The other 2 were at campsites 63 and 54."

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) (5)
- Reported Sep 17, 2020 14:22 by Liam Hampl
- Pismo SB--Oceano Campground, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.1085767,-120.6265268&ll=35.1085767,-120.6265268
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73725613
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Photos. 3 out of the 5 YRWA were at the tree with the placard, along the trail. The other 2 were at campsites 63 and 54."

***********

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eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more information, see our Terms of Use: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/


Warblers - Del Mar and Lila Keiser Park, Morro Bay

Kaaren Perry
 

A little distance birding with Judy Newhauser this morning took us to Del Mar Park   We met there at 8:30 and almost immediately had at least 6 Townsend's Warblers bathing together in the creek near the first bridge and moving around in the nearby willows.  A Hermit Warbler was also seen, working higher in the willows. A few Wilson's Warblers were scattered about.  Thanks to Dave Keeling calling us over, we saw an immature Black-throated Gray Warbler.  It was moving about in the trees on the little hill near the playground. 

A Fall female Audubon's Yellow-rumped Warbler was seen from the parking lot at  Lila Keiser Park. It was moving about in the cypress rows. It was our FOS. 



Re: Vermilion Flycatcher, Tropical Kingbird, Hermit Warbler & possible Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Oceano Campground

Lynne Breakstone
 

The Oceano campground will reopen on Monday - not good news for birders. MDO campground will not open on Monday.
Lynne Breakstone


Hermit Warbler?

Dale Ball
 

I popped out for a quick walk near the water tanks on Pecho Valley Road, right across from Rodman Drive this morning around 8am. The eucs and cypress were alive with bushtits, chickadees, goldfinches, few Townsend's, a Wilson's warbler, a few Hutton's Vireos, and this bird, who I think is a female Hermit warbler. Can someone confirm or deny that? Sorry about picture quality, lol.
Dale in Los Osos


Vermilion Flycatcher, Tropical Kingbird, Hermit Warbler & possible Scissor-tailed Flycatcher at Oceano Campground

Kevin Zimmer
 

Just back from a full morning of birding in South County, most of it spent at Oceano Campground.  Best find was a young male Vermilion Flycatcher, which I am just now seeing that Mike Bush has already posted to this site.  I posted it to the rare bird text message group when I first found it, and then again 30 minutes later when Brad Schram and I re-found it.  I never saw any other posts about this bird prior to finding it, nor did I see any responses to either of my posts on the message system, so, hopefully, these messages were actually posted to the group.  

Anyway, Brad and I followed the Vermilion Flycatcher around for another 30+ minutes after relocating it – it was basically patrolling the entire north end of the campground, particularly between campsites 60–80, perching on small posts and sallying out to the ground after insects.  Last seen around 11:00 a.m.

We also saw what I assume to be the previously reported Tropical Kingbird, perched out on bare branches hanging over the water at the north end of the lagoon.

Prior to running into Brad, I worked through a couple of Bushtit & Chickadee flocks pretty carefully, finding 1 Hermit Warbler, 12+ Townsend’s Warblers, 3 Orange-crowned Warblers, 5+ Yellow Warblers, 4 Wilson’s Warblers and 3 Warbling Vireos, plus a group of 5 Scaly-breasted Munias near the start of the Grand Dunes Trail.

I also had a naked-eye, nanosecond glimpse of what looked like a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher that blasted out of a fruiting Myoporum at the base of the Peninsula.  This was around 0900h and I never saw the bird again.  I can’t emphasize enough how fleeting and poor my view was, but my instant impression was of Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, a species which I’ve literally seen many thousands of, so, birders visiting the campground should be alert to that possibility.

I also checked the creek that abuts the north edge of the Monarch Butterfly Preserve, as well as the Pismo Creek mouth, but there was nothing of note at either spot.

Kevin J. Zimmer
Atascadero


Vermillion Flycatcher - Oceano Campground, Pismo State Beach

Mike Bush
 

Hi SLOCO Birders!

Out early in the marine layer this morning to see the previously reported (Jeff Miller & Tom Edell) Tropical Kingbird, I also saw a young male Vermillion Flycatcher, at Campsite #56. Jeff Miller also saw the Vermillion Flycatcher later in the morning.

List of my abbreviated visit w/photos: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73702999


Mike Bush
Los Osos, California


MEGAFIRE: Two Simple Ways to Help Birds Right Now

Kaaren Perry
 

Hello Birders, 

I received this message yesterday from Audubon California.  Many of us are wondering what the effect on the wildfires is having on our resident and migrant birds and if and how we might be able to help them survive. In case you haven't seen it I felt it was worth posting to our SLOCo birding list.  

Kaaren Perry
Morro Bay

Audubon California


Megafires in California are shattering records.

 

Smoky days are degrading our air quality and the respiratory health of millions of people. Our hearts go out to those who have been displaced, lost a home, or loved one. 

 

Many of you have asked how this impacts birds. Wildfires are posing a new stressor to birds who are already threatened by habitat loss, climate change, and pollution.

Various species are on the move to escape the flames and migrate. However, many wild food sources and rest areas are scorched, leaving birds highly vulnerable.

What can we do to help birds?

During this crisis, we recommend taking two simple steps to help local and migrating birds stay clean and nourished: providing water and food. 

By providing extra care during this crisis, you can help birds stay resilient. Your popular watering hole and eatery may give you a glimpse of birds that you've never seen before! 

Tips for Bird Baths and Feeders

WATER: Provide water in a bird bath or shallow tray (2 inches) for drinking and bathing. Add a few rocks for easy perching! With a lot of bird traffic to your bath during fires, it’s important to change out the water daily to prevent the spread of disease and to flush out any ash that has collected.

FOOD: Keep your bird feeders or trays stocked with bird seed. A variety of seeds will attract the greatest variety of birds. Black-oil sunflower seed appeals to the greatest number of birds. When using blends, choose mixtures containing sunflower seeds, millet, and cracked corn—the three most popular types of birdseed. Mixtures of peanuts, nuts, and dried fruit are attractive to woodpeckers, nuthatches, and titmice.

To avoid crowding and to attract the greatest variety of species, you can also provide table-like feeders for ground-feeding birds, tube feeders for shrub and treetop feeders, and suet feeders well off the ground for woodpeckers, nuthatches, and chickadees. Locating feeders where there is ample cover will also make it easy for birds to safely access the food.

How will the fires impact birds?

Research shows that bird lungs may be more susceptible to respiratory distress from smoke. They are generally less active during smoke events. We do not know how smoke impacts birds’ ability to migrate or hunt. There could be long-term implications for some bird populations.

Of course, most birds are highly mobile. Even as birds fly out of forests, shrublands, and grasslands that are aflame, that movement is a stressor as they must then compete with resident birds for limited food and water in new habitat areas. With fires burning through millions of acres, habitat refuges may also be limited.

How will the fires impact migration?

Right now, we are in songbird migration season. Millions of birds are coming south through California along the Pacific Flyway, looking for their usual resting spots, particularly along river corridors. When they find these areas burned, they continue on their way in search of reliable habitat, or they fly further south without an important stop to rest and refuel.

Bird migration is a series of stops, each of which are vital to a bird’s survival. If we remove these links in the chain, birds will have difficulty completing their journeys. In New Mexico, biologists are witnessing record numbers of dead migratory songbirds and have speculated that the cause may be related to fires in the West, leaving birds in a weakened condition for migration.

How will the fires impact bird habitat?

Fire is a natural part of almost every California ecosystem and is important to its health. But the intense, frequent fires that California has seen in recent years are not normal, and sometimes not healthy for habitat.

Nesting habitat will be at a premium in the parts of the state that have burned in recent years and this could impact an entire generation of birds in some areas if they are unable to find suitable habitat.

 

Read more about how wildfires affect birds and impact habitat>>

What else can we do to help birds?

As we begin to approach the rainy season, it’s a good time to plan for planting plants in backyards and gardens that are native to California, as these are better adapted to drought and fire. Audubon’s Plants for Birds database can help you find out what plants are appropriate for your area.

Thank you for everything you do to protect birds and our communities from wildfire. 
Stay Safe,
Andrea Jones, Director of Bird Conservation at Audubon California
Joanna Wu, Avian Ecologist at National Audubon Society

 

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Oso evening A List

Thomas Slater
 

Went to escape the hazy smoky air and brought my camera along. Saw 47 species without hardly trying. 
Lots of Northern Shovelers on the lake now. Phalaropes have all but disappeared.

Finally saw a Belted Kingfisher. Haven't seen one out at Oso for a while. Actually heard it about 4 days ago but was unable to locate it in the dense fog. Tonight it put on a show. It had me running back and forth on the boardwalk. 

Found 7 warblers and got pictures of all of them. Early Yellow-rumped Warbler (I guess this is the time of year to be excited about them because they're still kinda rare but... they're still just YR warblers haha) and a Hermit Warbler. There were 11 Townsend's Warblers. They were all over the place. Only one Wilson's Warbler.

Got a Barn Owl along Oso Flaco road on a sign. It actually flew alongside my truck for 20 seconds, about 15 miles an hour, really soft wingbeats and floppy. I can see how they get hit so much. Was about 20' off my door, then crossed right in front of me. Glad I was going so slow.

Thank you Jim, Jay and all you Pecho Willows birders who made me jealous enough to go out tonight to try and drum up something for us so county birders. 

Full list and pictures here -


Bird on,
Tom Slater
Nipomo




[eBird Alert] San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert <daily>

eBird alert
 

*** Species Summary:

- Red-eyed Vireo (3 reports)
- Chipping Sparrow (1 report)
- Chestnut-sided Warbler (7 reports)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> San Luis Obispo County Rare Bird Alert.The report below shows observations of rare birds in San Luis Obispo County. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN36231
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

eBird encourages our users to bird safely, responsibly, and mindfully. Please follow the recommendations of your local health authorities and respect any active travel restrictions in your area. For more information visit: https://ebird.org/news/please-bird-mindfully

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 16:20 by Mike Bush
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73652874
- Comments: "Pale below, darker above withe a dark eyeline through the eye."

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 13:00 by Eric Wier
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73653253
- Comments: "First reported at this location on September 7th by Jay Carroll. Rather large and long-bodied vireo, whitish underparts, grayish-brown back contrasting with darker cap, prominent white eye stripe. Methodically feeding in mid to upper canopy."

Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) (1)
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 09:38 by Jim Royer
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73641852
- Comments: "Continuing bird."

Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) (2)
- Reported Sep 14, 2020 11:10 by Petra Clayton
- Islay Creek Campground--Montana de Oro SP, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.2736118,-120.8838502&ll=35.2736118,-120.8838502
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73616312
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Two juveniles perched on restroom fence - one dry, one wet, the latter vigorously preening. - Light gray underparts; pale light brown face; dark eye line; pale nape; finely streaked brown crown; pinkish bill with tiny black tip."

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1)
- Reported Sep 16, 2020 09:15 by Jeanette Stone
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73675291
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "First found by Mark Mushkat. Lime green upper parts, yellowish white wing bars, slight grayish to the whitish underparts with faint chestnut sides, complete light eye ring."

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1)
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 14:45 by Liam Hampl
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73650233
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Photos. Continuing bird first seen by Mark Mushkat. Faint chestnut streaking down the sides, greenish cap and back."

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1)
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 14:45 by Kilian Hampl
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73650858
- Media: 3 Photos
- Comments: "Photos. Continuing bird first seen by Mark Mushkat. Faint chestnut streaking down the sides, greenish cap and back."

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1)
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 13:00 by Eric Wier
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73653253
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "First observed this morning by Mark Mushkat. Warbler with green cap, yellow-green back, white underparts, white eye-ring, and rusty red streaks on flanks."

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 12:30 by Jeff Miller
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73638539
- Media: 2 Photos
- Comments: "Refound with Jim Royer. Lime green back and cap, gray face, pale gray underneath, pale yellow wingbars, faint chestnut red streaking down the side, complete white eye ring. Photos"

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 11:15 by Jay Carroll
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73637645
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Warbler with pale gray underparts, greenish-yellow back with some darker streaking, greenish crown, white eye ring, two whitish wing bars, chestnut-colored wash on sides; this bird was reported earlier in the morning by Mark Mushkat."

Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Sep 15, 2020 09:38 by Jim Royer
- Pecho Road Willows, San Luis Obispo, California
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=35.3170687,-120.85271&ll=35.3170687,-120.85271
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73641852
- Comments: "First found by Mark Mushkat. Lime green upper parts, yellowish white wing bars, slight grayish to the whitish underparts with faint chestnut sides, complete light eye ring, cocked tail much of the time. An active bird."

***********

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MCAS Bird Finding Guides Updated

Joanne Aasen
 

[posted with permission]

Interactive GIS maps have been added to the MCAS Bird Finding Guides (BFG), with pins that connect to locations in the BFG and to eBird Hotspots. This is combining the best of both worlds: BFG offers local information about SLO County locations and eBird offers a wealth of information about specie sightings in SLO County and beyond. Both offer features that appeal to first-time birders, visitors to SLO County, and to the most avid and experienced birders.

Access the guides (via computer, smart phone, or tablet) from the MCAS website menu: BIRDSàMCAS Bird Finding Guides.

HISTORY: These guides were initiated in 2007 by Al Schmierer, who first focused on The Carrizo Plain, and then were expanded to the rest of the county with help from Tom Edell, Maggie Smith and Mike Stiles, and with website assistance from Paul Andreano and Joanne Aasen. The guides were added to the current MCAS website in 2013.

In 2020, Cuesta College instructor Feride Schroeder and intern Kasia Crowley, in consultation with Joanne Aasen and Bart Beckman of MCAS, created Interactive GIS Maps linking the local information contained in the guides to corresponding eBird Hotspots. Funding for the Cuesta internship was provided by National Science Foundation ATE Grant #1800779 GIS Technology: Mapping, Data Management and Work-Based Learning Across Industry Sectors. eBird is "...the world's largest biodiversity-related citizen science project... .

Others who have assisted in this newest edition are: Tom Edell, Jay Carroll, Norman Pillsbury, Kathanne Lynch, Wendy McKeown, and Tom Slater. Map photos were contributed by Tanner Chapman and Bart Beckman.

Joanne Aasen

MCAS Communications Chair