Date   

Re: Nautical FIlms

Oliver Shaw
 

The film about the Clyde Puffer has now been identified by a correspondent on Openboat;   The Maggie,  one of the finest of the Ealing Comedies.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Maggie 

Any pointers to the film about the Cambria still very welcome,  please.

 

Oliver


Nautical FIlms

Oliver Shaw
 

My sailing club is introducing a regular film night,  featuring nautical films.   Although I personally am not really into films this strikes me as well worth a try,  and I shall support it.

We already have a list of 10 films to start things off,  and I have suggested a further three.

There are two more that I would like to track down,  but cannot remember either the titles or where one would obtain them;   but I have the impression that both of them came up in conversation on the old Openboat site (on Yahoo Groups).    One is a superb film of one of the last of the Clyde local trading ships,  not sure whether it is one of the Puffers or the next size up,  towards the end of her trading days;   and the other is a superb film of the Cambria,  the last Thames Barge trading commercially under sail,  under her owner and captain Bob Roberts.    

Can anyone point me in the right direction,  please?

Perhaps I should clarify that subsequent to the retirement of Cambria I gather that occasional other sailing craft,  both traditional and modern,  have returned to trading under sail;   I don't know whether any of them are Thames barges,  but I don't rule out the possibility.   So although Cambria was stated at the time to be the last the practice appears not to have died out altogether;   merely to have come to a stop with Cambria,  and subsequently re-started in a very small way.

Then of course in the fishing rather than the freighting arena,  there are the Falmouth Oyster Dredgers still fishing under sail over the winter months,  and racing (almost as yachts) in the summer;   and they look superb.    I had the pleasure of seeing the fleet as they crossed our course while finishing a race in July this year.



Oliver


Re: SOA AGM 11 Sept 2021 - Notes to meeting

Michael Walton
 

Hi Phil
Thanks for the AGM notes
If Spirit of zEcstacy is the Chichester one then I have it
Mike


On 25 Sep 2021, at 09:49, Phil Weston <rpwweston@...> wrote:

Copy to the notes for the AGM attached. With regard to item "9. Discussion of the SOA’s future" , a questionnaire will be be sent all members in due course ! 
<SOA AGM - notes meeting 11 September 2021.pdf>


SOA AGM 11 Sept 2021 - Notes to meeting

Phil Weston
 

Copy to the notes for the AGM attached. With regard to item "9. Discussion of the SOA’s future" , a questionnaire will be be sent all members in due course ! 


Re: WELCOME ABOARD

Michael Walton
 

Hi Rob

If you join the SOA there is a DVD which answers lots of questions and is a mine of information.

The mast has a pair of shrouds, some have 2 pairs. The roller furling should have a forestay passing through it which is attached to the bow plate. The furling jib/genoa slides up into the furling spar and can be left in permanently or slid in/out when rigging the boat.

Send photos of any area causing confusion and we will try to help

Mike




------ Original Message ------
From: "Rob Lodge" <rob.lodge@...>
To: shipmate@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 19 Sep, 21 At 13:33
Subject: Re: [shipmate] WELCOME ABOARD

Hi Mike,

It's not my boat it's a friends - he's on the group now also. Based in the North West near fleetwood.

We were just looking how it should be rigged and what was missing - has the mast, boom, mainsail and the fixed roller jib but not much else.



On Sun, 19 Sep 2021, 13:20 Michael Walton via groups.io, <waltons=talk21.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Rob

where abouts are you?

Hope you are going to join the Shipmate owners association

Have you bought Rainbow?

Mike Walton




------ Original Message ------
From: "Rob Lodge" <rob.lodge@...>
To: shipmate@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 19 Sep, 21 At 13:05
Subject: Re: [shipmate] WELCOME ABOARD

Hello - was looking to help a friend with rigging his shipmate as came incomplete. Looking for advice on setting up the mainsheet/roller jib system.



On Sun, 19 Sep 2021, 12:48 damoroberts via groups.io, <damoroberts=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi. I'm a real person. Recently bought a little shipmate senior and hoping to find other owners


Re: WELCOME ABOARD

Rob Lodge
 

Hi Mike,

It's not my boat it's a friends - he's on the group now also. Based in the North West near fleetwood.

We were just looking how it should be rigged and what was missing - has the mast, boom, mainsail and the fixed roller jib but not much else. 



On Sun, 19 Sep 2021, 13:20 Michael Walton via groups.io, <waltons=talk21.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Rob

where abouts are you?

Hope you are going to join the Shipmate owners association

Have you bought Rainbow?

Mike Walton




------ Original Message ------
From: "Rob Lodge" <rob.lodge@...>
To: shipmate@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 19 Sep, 21 At 13:05
Subject: Re: [shipmate] WELCOME ABOARD

Hello - was looking to help a friend with rigging his shipmate as came incomplete. Looking for advice on setting up the mainsheet/roller jib system.



On Sun, 19 Sep 2021, 12:48 damoroberts via groups.io, <damoroberts=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi. I'm a real person. Recently bought a little shipmate senior and hoping to find other owners


Re: WELCOME ABOARD

Michael Walton
 

Hi Rob

where abouts are you?

Hope you are going to join the Shipmate owners association

Have you bought Rainbow?

Mike Walton




------ Original Message ------
From: "Rob Lodge" <rob.lodge@...>
To: shipmate@groups.io
Sent: Sunday, 19 Sep, 21 At 13:05
Subject: Re: [shipmate] WELCOME ABOARD

Hello - was looking to help a friend with rigging his shipmate as came incomplete. Looking for advice on setting up the mainsheet/roller jib system.



On Sun, 19 Sep 2021, 12:48 damoroberts via groups.io, <damoroberts=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi. I'm a real person. Recently bought a little shipmate senior and hoping to find other owners


Re: WELCOME ABOARD

Rob Lodge
 

Hello - was looking to help a friend with rigging his shipmate as came incomplete. Looking for advice on setting up the mainsheet/roller jib system.



On Sun, 19 Sep 2021, 12:48 damoroberts via groups.io, <damoroberts=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
Hi. I'm a real person. Recently bought a little shipmate senior and hoping to find other owners


Re: WELCOME ABOARD

Damian
 

Hi. I'm a real person. Recently bought a little shipmate senior and hoping to find other owners


WELCOME ABOARD

John Button G8JMB
 

The following have joined
damoroberts@, rob.lodge@, gabhan7@

PLEASE POST TO SAY HELLO AND PROVE THAT YOU ARE A PERSON

WHAT ARE YOUR NAMES< 
Good sailing 
JOhn Group owner


Re: The future of the SOA ?

Phil Weston
 

Thanks, Oliver !

On 5 Sep 2021 19:10, "Oliver Shaw via groups.io" <acapella13934@...> wrote:

 

Phil,

 

First,  please accept my apologies for the AGM.

 

Second,  thank you for your consultation document on the future of the Association.   The concept of such a consultation seems a very sensible step at this time,  and I will endeavour to respond in a day or two with some considered thoughts.

 

Regards,

 

 

 

 

Oliver

 

 

From: shipmate@groups.io On Behalf Of Phil Weston
Sent: 04 September 2021 09:48
To: shipmate@groups.io
Subject: [shipmate] The future of the SOA ?

 

Hopefully you will have received a copy of the agenda  for the "Shipmate Owners Association AGM _ Sat 11 Sep".

I know only a handful of members attend the meeting at Rutland. However, there is one item we are keen to get members input to,  namely "The future of the SOA" - Agenda Item 7.

So even if you are not coming, please fell free to commnet on the proposals.



Re: The future of the SOA ?

Oliver Shaw
 

 

Phil,

 

Some initial thoughts on your consultation document;   I may yet get back to you with further thoughts.

 

Options 1 and 2 may sensibly be combined.   Much as I might have a vested interest in my Privateer entitling me to full membership,  I tried to interest fellow Privateer owners some years ago in setting up a Privateer Class Association,  and more recently tried to interest them in joining SOA as Associate Members,  and achieved a resounding nil score in both attempts.

 

If it is any consolation,  Class Associations and Owners’ Associations more widely are noticeably badly supported;   however that does not mean for one moment that such Associations are not worth supporting  -  it merely indicates that we have to be prepared for only low levels of uptake.   As one the more successful examples the GP14 Class Association nonetheless provides dramatic evidence of that;   I am a long serving Officer of that Association,  and we regard ourselves as one of the more successful Class Associations,  and yet with well over 14,000 boats built over a period of more than 70 years our total membership is only a few hundred;  sadly it tends to fluctuate,  with some of our top racers joining us for our World Championships every two years (approximately) but not renewing until the next World Championship comes round  -  absolutely no long-term loyalty there,  notwithstanding a few splendid exceptions,   including the late Richard Estaugh,  and also the current World Champion (Mike Senior) who is a very loyal and long-established member,  and past Committee Member.  

 

Option 1 on its own therefore seems unlikely to bring in more than just the occasional new member (plus “upgrading” myself to full membership!).   If we were going to widen our scope in this way it would seem more sensible to widen it to include (almost) any (small) trailer-sailer yacht;   however it might be appropriate to set an upper size limit,  even if only as a guide to prospective members.   Such expansion might also help to retain long-serving loyal members who now sail boats other than Shipmates.

 

On the matter of a size limit,  such trailer-sailers as the McGregor 26,  the larger Cornish Crabbers (and Norfolk Smugglers),  and fixed keel boats such as the Folkboat (and I kid you not,  I have actually seen one in Fort William being towed behind a Range Rover,  and very clearly being trail-sailed) are radically different boats.   It is possibly better not to formally exclude them,  but simply to indicate that they are not our target,  and then leave it to the membership and to owners to see how this develops.   

 

I have a parallel from a different field.   My late parents were lifelong caravanners,  and for about the last 25 years of their lives they were members of the Safari Caravan Club.   This started as an Owners’ Club,  for owners of Safari caravans,  which at the time were the Rolls Royce of touring caravans;   but the marque went out of production in 1982,  and after a further few years the club found itself with an increasing number of long-established members who valued their membership,  and the social camaraderie,  but who no longer wanted to be confined to an ageing caravan and wanted to update.   So they changed the rules so as to admit caravans of other makes,  with just a modest change of name (from Safari Owners’ Club to Safari Caravan Club),  and continued with much the same activities and broadly the same membership.   By the time I was briefly involved,  perhaps 15 years later,  it was not unusual for my parents and I to have the only two actual Safaris on a rally field;   but the club,  and the camaraderie remained,  albeit generally with more modern caravans.   There is perhaps a model for us there.

 

Although I never had occasion to become a member,  I have always thought that the now-defunct Trail-Sale Association was a potentially useful organisation.   In particular I thought that their facility for offering Yachtmaster practical exams in members’ own trailer-sailers was most valuable.   If we are to expand our remit,  we could well consider stepping into the gap which they have vacated;   but it would be sensible first to consider why they vacated that remit if it was in fact viable  -  if only so that we can avoid obvious mistakes,  and blind alleys.

 

 

Some Other Considerations

 

SOA meetings are predominantly at weekends.   While that suits some members,  it does not necessarily suit all.  I myself,  for example,  being retired but also being a Church Organist and Choirmaster,  am usually otherwise committed on Sundays but am often available mid-week.

 

Another personal consideration for myself is that my particular boat takes me around 2½ hours to rig after towing by road,  and a similar time before towing back home again.   That is vastly longer than it takes me to rig a dinghy,  and probably about twice what it would take to rig a Shipmate.   Alright,  in part that is a consequence of my very deliberate choice to choose a gaff cutter rig,  and to equip it with all the gubbins;   in that respect all boats are compromises.   My boat is fitted out for extended cruising,  rather than for trailing to a weekend meet;  and if I were intending to use her primarily for weekend rallies I would rig her somewhat differently.    So in my case a week-long rally,  or a 5-day (weekdays) rally,  might well attract me more than a weekend.  

 

Of course one size does not fit all,  but offering one or more mid-week events  -  possibly of longer duration  -  within the programme might be worth trying.   That might attract a different set of members.

 

Having said that,  I must declare certain personal constraints.   First,  as a busy A Level Examiner I am normally tied to a desk fairly continuously from late May through to early July;   and then from late July through to early September I normally aim to be away on my summer cruise.

 

Second;   earlier this year I had to part with my Discovery,  and couldn’t afford to replace it with another Discovery.   Although I am very pleased with my replacement car (Volvo C70 convertible) I think the Privateer is a little heavy for it to tow,  at least when fully stocked for extended cruising.   At some point in the future I intend to buy another Discovery,  just for towing duties,  and will probably keep the Volvo as well;   but that might not necessarily be next year,  so next year’s summer cruise may well be from my home club  -  an Irish Sea circuit  -  Liverpool, Anglesey,  Isle of Man,  Cumbria,  Morecambe Bay,  and back to Liverpool.

 

Once I firm up my cruise itinerary I would be very happy to publish details within the Association,  and any other members who wished to bring their own boats and join me for part of it would of course be very welcome.

 

 

SAGA:    The problem of the supply of articles from members is an old one,  common to a great many organisations,  including two with which I have a long involvement  -  my sailing club,  and my local Organists’ Association.   I personally have contributed a number of articles to SAGA,  but I don’t want to hog the show,  and it is a matter of balance.

 

If it helps,  I edit (and very largely write) the Newsletter of my sailing club,  which I bring out four times per year.  The  declared aim for this is to be a small sailing magazine,  rather than just a parochial club Newsletter.    If it helps,  I would be very happy to supply copies of this to SAGA Editor,  to extract whatever he may wish,  provided it is properly attributed.

 

 

 

 

Membership:

 

Perhaps the time may have come to merge the Full and Associate categories.

 

I suggest that we should not be too concerned about the level of the subscription;   the present level is trivial,  but it is appropriate because at present we have minimal expenditure,  and there is no need for any increase.   But we should not be afraid of a significant increase if members are then to be getting something to justify the higher figure.

 

 

 

Dinghy Cruising Association:

 

I write this as an ex-member,  who resigned in good standing simply because I found that over a period of many years I managed to get to only one of their rallies,  and that on only two occasions,  and I felt that I was neither contributing much to them nor getting much use of my membership.   That was in part because their rallies are normally at weekends,  and partly because my main sailing was my main summer cruise,  rather than weekends here and there around the country.

 

I still have friends in that Association,  and I view the Association with goodwill.

 

They are an unusual Association.   One description,  one which I believe they pride themselves on,  is that they are “the organisation for dinghy cruisers who don’t want to be organised!”   I am not sure how well their approach to running rallies would interface with SOA’s approach;   at the very least,  careful consideration would be needed.

 

Hope this is helpful;    and I may have other ideas later.

 

 

 

Oliver

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: shipmate@groups.io On Behalf Of Phil Weston
Sent: 04 September 2021 09:48
To: shipmate@groups.io
Subject: [shipmate] The future of the SOA ?

 

Hopefully you will have received a copy of the agenda  for the "Shipmate Owners Association AGM _ Sat 11 Sep".

I know only a handful of members attend the meeting at Rutland. However, there is one item we are keen to get members input to,  namely "The future of the SOA" - Agenda Item 7.

So even if you are not coming, please fell free to commnet on the proposals.


Re: The future of the SOA ?

Oliver Shaw
 

 

Phil,

 

First,  please accept my apologies for the AGM.

 

Second,  thank you for your consultation document on the future of the Association.   The concept of such a consultation seems a very sensible step at this time,  and I will endeavour to respond in a day or two with some considered thoughts.

 

Regards,

 

 

 

 

Oliver

 

 

From: shipmate@groups.io On Behalf Of Phil Weston
Sent: 04 September 2021 09:48
To: shipmate@groups.io
Subject: [shipmate] The future of the SOA ?

 

Hopefully you will have received a copy of the agenda  for the "Shipmate Owners Association AGM _ Sat 11 Sep".

I know only a handful of members attend the meeting at Rutland. However, there is one item we are keen to get members input to,  namely "The future of the SOA" - Agenda Item 7.

So even if you are not coming, please fell free to commnet on the proposals.


The future of the SOA ?

Phil Weston
 

Hopefully you will have received a copy of the agenda  for the "Shipmate Owners Association AGM _ Sat 11 Sep".

I know only a handful of members attend the meeting at Rutland. However, there is one item we are keen to get members input to,  namely "The future of the SOA" - Agenda Item 7.

So even if you are not coming, please fell free to commnet on the proposals.


WELCOME ABOARD

John Button G8JMB
 

Gabriel has just joined'

email gabhan7@...

Welcome aboard
Please post to say hell and prove you are a person...

Good sailing
John 
Group owner


Re: Man Overboard!

Oliver Shaw
 

Steve White has invited me to correct my statement that I understand that MOB recovery is not taught at RYA Level 1 or 2.

I did say that this was my understanding;  and I was going by the desperately limited information on course content available on their website.   Even on a check today,  on their recently updated website,  the only course content that I can find is contained in a downloadable document (attached),  which makes no mention of MOB recovery at any level until one reaches Seamanship Skills,  which they rate as an Advanced course.

I am happy to make the correction,  but if RYA fail to adequately publish the course content they can hardly complain if experienced practitioners get our facts wrong in assessing what the course contains!    I have no wish either to do the courses or to buy the books just in order to find out what they teach;   I expect the information to be readily accessible!

Steve writes that "The RYA syllabus for Level 2 includes a series of highly related boat manoeuvres including coming safely alongside a boat,  jetty,  buoy and MOB, to help develop boat handling skills. Furthermore the mandatory capsize drill requires participants to have theoretical and practical experience of getting a crew from the water into the boat.   Methods of recovering unconscious crew members are not discussed at RYA L2.

"(The picking up of a MOB first time is a standard sailing test of an RYA Dinghy Instructor-to-be. )

"I concede that the MOB is conducted with a half filled bottle or similar, and not a person.

"On the RYA Safety Boat syllabus, considerable time is spent on this subject, including practical experience of getting an unhelping person into a RIB or other safety vessel using a variety of methods."

I am happy to make this correction,  although it applies to only one detail (in one sentence) of what I wrote. 



Oliver


Man Overboard!

Oliver Shaw
 

There are no universal right answers to this,  and the intention of this post is to start an informed conversation.

This is not a dinghy group,  but some of you nonetheless have massive dinghy experience and may have some ideas to contribute.

The starting point is that in  a few weeks' time I am to run the second iteration of the Advanced Cruiser Training Course that I have developed for the GP14 Class Association.  Since I understand that MOB drill is not taught at either RYA Level 1 or 2,  but only in certain of their Advanced courses,  I intend to include this;   and I then thought that it would be instructive to use the weighted dummy that my club use for MOB drill in our Powerboat training.   The prospect of recovering an unconscious adult from the water,  in a sailing dinghy,  is to my mind a matter of some dread,  and should the situation ever arise one urgently needs outside help;   hence the situation justifies a Mayday call.

However  ...   ...     

MOB is primarily a concern for yachtsmen rather than dinghy sailors,  and even there it is fortunately rare.     In dinghies it is even more rare  -  but nonetheless it does occasionally happen.    I myself have once been MOB,  in gale conditions,  and the boat was drifting downwind faster than I could swim.    My radio was aboard the boat;   ever since then I have worn it on my person  ...   ...    I was mightily relieved when I saw the lifeboat maroons go up.

On the rare occasions when MOB occurs in dinghies it is is even more rare for the casualty to be unconscious;   but one presumes it can nonetheless happen.    And this includes occasions when the casualty becomes MOB because of a medical episode causing him/her to lose consciousness in the first place.   I have once been involved in  such a situation (suspected heart attack),  as a Safety Boat Coxswain,  where the casualty collapsed into the bottom of the dinghy rather than overboard  -  but in different circumstances he could well have gone MOB.

I have the impression that most dinghy MOB training,  even in the relevant RYA Advanced courses,  concentrates on simply getting back to the casualty,  and tacitly assumes that he/she will still be conscious and able to assist in the process of then getting back onboard.

But how does one get a waterlogged 80-kg unconscious adult out of the water and back aboard a sailing dinghy?   Particularly since there may well be only a single person left aboard the dinghy;  and that single person may be a woman or a child.

Drop all sail,  and attempt to haul the casualty over the side?    That would seem to incur the serious risk of capsize in the attempt.

Or over the transom.  perhaps?   At best,  that might require massive strength,  which the remaining crewman (or woman,  or child) may well not have.

Or deliberate capsize,  tie the casualty into the boat,  then right her,  scooping up the casualty?   The might be the easiest method,  but there is serious potential risk of entanglement and entrapment.

This is why I am half expecting to advise my trainees that in such an event they need outside help,  fast,  and that they should be broadcasting a Mayday.    And the exercise may well serve only to demonstrate to them how almost impossible is the task without outside help.

But am I missing something?    

Any good ideas,  folks?



Oliver


Re: Retirement of Rob Helyar - and Continuity of Supplies

John Button G8JMB
 

Oliver
Thank you for the information and photos- makes things much clearer.

Good sailing
John


Re: Retirement of Rob Helyar - and Continuity of Supplies

Oliver Shaw
 

John,

Your first two questions are linked.

On most,  if not all,  yacht systems (and also the Holt Minireef,  long since discontinued by the manufacturer) the spar does of course rotate around the forestay,  and once rigged it remains standing at all times.   The sail is then raised or lowered by means of a track in the spar,  and a halliard.

The Helyar system is different in this respect,  and indeed it differs between its two versions.   In essence the spar rotates around the luff wire,  not the forestay,  and it remains entirely separate from the forestay;  so the entire spar together with the sail can be removed from the boat without dropping the mast.  With the Mk 1 system,  the spar is slit along its entire length,  and slides over the luff of a conventional headsail,  trapping the luff wire inside the spar.   With the Mk 2 version,  the headsail is made with a separate luff wire,  and an enlarged luff pocket which is just the right size to accommodate the assembled spar;    the luff wire is then inserted inside the spar before the length is set and the final eye spllce is made,  (and once both ends have their eye splices it cannot be removed from the spar without cutting),  and the assembled unit is then placed inside the luff pocket of the sail.

On many dinghies and small cruising boats the headsail luff is very close to the forestay,  and once proper rig tension is applied the forestay often becomes a little slack.    Some attention to the detail is then needed in order to ensure that the slightly slack forestay does not get caught up in the roll as the headsail is furled.   This problem can be prevented by a combination of two techniques;   first,  ensure that even when the rig is tensioned the forestay still has enough tension to remain just taut;   On my GP14s I used to achieve this simply by careful setting of the forestay tension,  but last week I saw two GP14s which use a short length of shockcord to take up any slack in the forestay,  and that seems an easier and perhaps better system.    Second,  use of a spacer at the head of the sail to maintain adequate distance between the furled sail and the forestay.

Luff tension does of course involve two unrelated elements;   the tension in the luff wire,  and the tension in the sailcloth.   The tension in the luff wire (the rig tension) is adjusted in whatever way one would use if no reefing system were fitted;   the sail is hoisted,  on its spar,  and the rig is then tensioned in the usual way.   On my GP14 I used to use an 8:1 muscle box,  but many others use either a Highfield lever or a cascade tackle.   At the other end of the scale,  for the staysail on my Privateer 20 I use a loop in the fall of the halliard to give an improvised 3:1 purchase;   that provides sufficient tension in this instance,  and there are good reasons why I cannot use anything more sophisticated.   I have no doubt that a toothed rack across the halliard is used by some owners,  although it happens to be several years since I last saw that system in operation.

For the tension in the sailcloth,  on at least the latest version of the Mk 2 the head of the sail is attached to the top of the spar,  and a light lanyard is then used to pull the tack down towards the reefing drum,  with just sufficient tension to pull out any creases,  in exactly the same way as is sometimes done on a conventional headsail with no reefing.   Once set,  this adjustment will normally remain unaltered for the life of the sail.    On the Mk 1,  the tension in the sailcloth is adjusted by whatever method (if any) the sailmaker provided when the sail was made,  and again will often remain unaltered for the life of the sail..

On your third question I am a little hesitant because I don't clearly remember how the spar is attached to the furling drum,  but I can assure you that it is adequately attached.   I think it involves a stainless steel clevis pin through holes in the spar and through the jaws on the top of the drum,  but there may possibly be a spacer of some sort between the two.    Two of the attached photos show the Mk 2 version (dating from 2017) on my Privateer,  and should have sufficient resolution to enable you to expand them sufficiently to study the head and the tack detail.

I am not clear what you mean is asking "what stops the spar winding up",  but if you are referring to potential twist in the spar that is adequately met by the torsional rigidity of the material and the wall thickness;  the problem simply does not happen.   In the days when I still sailed my GP14 I regularly used the system,  reefed,  in moderately strong winds,  and at least once in full gale conditions moderately offshore,  and never once had any noticeable issues of twist in the spar.    The third photo shows A Capella sailing reefed on a blustery day in 2010,  and there is no noticeable problem of twist there.

Hope this helps,


Oliver


Re: Retirement of Rob Helyar - and Continuity of Supplies

John Button G8JMB
 

Hi Oliver
Thank you for the info on Helyar furlers/ reefing and Hartley Boats.  I looked into these a while ago, both the split spar for luff ropes and the solid spar for tape..  I came up with questions  that I could not resolve from the info on the Helyar website:
1.  How do you control and adjust luff tension?
2.  How do you drop the foresail without dropping the mast; it seemed that the spar rotates on the forestay?
3  How is the spar attached to the furling drum and what stops the spar winding up?
I don't know anyone in Poole with a system I could look at.
I'm interested because I'm restoring a west wight potter, originally rigged with a Holt minireef.

The only thing I could find on the Harley website was a price (£500) for a wanderer system, no info at all.

Regards
Good sailing
John Button

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