Date   

avoiding hackers

Ruth Berman
 

 A week and a half ago  I had the unpleasant experience of having my computer hacked. (Happily, a Geek Squad agent has just been out and unhacked it). I hear there's a lot of this scam going around, so I thought I'd better tell you about it in case it gets tried on any of you.

If a guy calls up and says (probably with an Indian accent) that a suspicious-looking purchase has been made on your account (probably Amazon), and did you really want to buy this thingamajig. Say you'll look into it and hang up. Don't let him get going with the at-first innocent-sounding steps to stop the supposed purchase from being mailed and to refund the purchase money, a process that will lead to an "accidental" over-payment and more steps to get money from you to refund the over-payment and also to get your password. 

Fortunately, the U of MN email system has a double id set-up -- at intervals it shuts off your email, and you have to put in your separate U password to get back on. The scammer did not have that, so was shortly locked out of my computer, and so could not do additional damage. The Geek Squad guy has set me up with a new password, so here I am able to tell you folks about it.

There is a lot of email stacked up from the meantime, so if you were expecting an answer from me to a message you sent recently -- it'll probably take me a while to go through the lot and start making replies.

Ruth


Re: Splitting profits for translation

S. Qiouyi Lu (Arsenika)
 

Ideally, you’d negotiate for 200% payment from the publication, 100% to the author and 100% to the translator(s). Not all publications have the budget, though. Ultimately, there are two sets of rights that are being sold: (1) rights to the text in its original language, which are held by the author, and (2) rights to the translation, which are held by the translator(s). It doesn’t have to be a strict 50% divide. If you have access to the SFWA Bulletin, I believe Ken Liu has written some articles on selling rights and sharing profits.

Best,


S. Qiouyi Lu

For my bibliography/CV, press kit, news, events, and newsletter signup, please visit my website.

On Nov 24, 2020, 10:56 AM -0800, Brian Garrison <haikooligan@...>, wrote:
I can see that. I'm still curious about whether a 50% split is the standard arrangement. What experiences have people had (positive or negative)?

I'm also curious about what factors do start to create a meaningful shift in the balance of profit sharing. Yes, a basic translation generally does not significantly alter or add anything to the final work (i.e., it is still words on a page, even though the poem may be breathtaking, stir deep emotions, or cause the reader to reflect). I can rally behind keeping the cut to the original creator the same even if it was translated by 1,000 monkeys with typewriters. The work of drafting the poem in a new language and searching for markets isn't altered by adding additional brainpower. The original creator deserves a fair cut. Maybe in some instances, the fair cut is for more than 50% going to the original creator?

At some point the calculation for Fair Cut changes. For example, if the poem is turned into a broadside, there's the art and design work. If you purchase movie rights, then there is scriptwriting, acting, recording... a whole host of new roles and creative work for the final production. I'm curious to hear more thoughts, or if people know of good resources that spell out some of these details.

Brian



On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 8:15 PM F. J. Bergmann <demiurge@...> wrote:
My opinion is that the original author should get 50% regardless of how many translators are involved. Of course individual agreements can be negotiated.

F. J. Bergmann





On Nov 23, 2020, at 8:49 PM, Brian Garrison <haikooligan@...> wrote:

Who knows what a typical arrangement would look like when splitting profit on a translation? 


If it's just one author making a translation, I assume they might work out a deal with the original writer to share 50% of the income. But maybe a typical deal would balance that differently?


If there are two collaborators involved in the translation, would it make sense to shift that to 33% as an "even split"? Or would the original author be right to expect the same amount (e.g., the 50% assumed above) no matter how many folks were involved downstream?


Thanks for any examples you're willing to share in the group or individually!

Brian


Re: Splitting profits for translation

Brian Garrison
 

I can see that. I'm still curious about whether a 50% split is the standard arrangement. What experiences have people had (positive or negative)?

I'm also curious about what factors do start to create a meaningful shift in the balance of profit sharing. Yes, a basic translation generally does not significantly alter or add anything to the final work (i.e., it is still words on a page, even though the poem may be breathtaking, stir deep emotions, or cause the reader to reflect). I can rally behind keeping the cut to the original creator the same even if it was translated by 1,000 monkeys with typewriters. The work of drafting the poem in a new language and searching for markets isn't altered by adding additional brainpower. The original creator deserves a fair cut. Maybe in some instances, the fair cut is for more than 50% going to the original creator?

At some point the calculation for Fair Cut changes. For example, if the poem is turned into a broadside, there's the art and design work. If you purchase movie rights, then there is scriptwriting, acting, recording... a whole host of new roles and creative work for the final production. I'm curious to hear more thoughts, or if people know of good resources that spell out some of these details.

Brian



On Mon, Nov 23, 2020 at 8:15 PM F. J. Bergmann <demiurge@...> wrote:
My opinion is that the original author should get 50% regardless of how many translators are involved. Of course individual agreements can be negotiated.

F. J. Bergmann





On Nov 23, 2020, at 8:49 PM, Brian Garrison <haikooligan@...> wrote:

Who knows what a typical arrangement would look like when splitting profit on a translation? 


If it's just one author making a translation, I assume they might work out a deal with the original writer to share 50% of the income. But maybe a typical deal would balance that differently?


If there are two collaborators involved in the translation, would it make sense to shift that to 33% as an "even split"? Or would the original author be right to expect the same amount (e.g., the 50% assumed above) no matter how many folks were involved downstream?


Thanks for any examples you're willing to share in the group or individually!

Brian


All haiku critique group

Brian Garrison
 

Hi friends, 

As the resident SFPA Matchmaker (for critique groups only), there's some interest in having an all haiku group. Please email me directly to let me know if you would like to participate, and I can connect interested individuals. 

For others who are curious about our other ongoing small group critiques, please feel free to reach out with questions or fill out this form. 

Keep writing,
Brian


Call for the SFPA November Round-Up

Michael Payne
 

What's that thing people say:

     Around this time of year about counting blessings?  Well, let's do some of that.  And let's count other people's, too, while we're at it.  I know I can use all the blessings I can get...

     So if you're an SFPA member who's had poetry or anything relating to poetry (especially speculative poetry) that's become available for the first time to purchase and/or read in a non-SFPA venue during the month of November—or any time in the last batch of months if you've missed our previous Round-Ups—send a note to mpayne followed by the @ sign followed by kuci.org.  Please include your name and the following info:

(2) poem(s) (periodical, essay, review, interview, etc.), (non-genre/print), “title”, venue/publisher, date, LINK (even for print only - chances are the place has some sort of a web presence)

Totally fictitious example:

Cranston Snord, poem, "Bunny Agonistes," Bismuth Quarterly, Trocar Books, Autumn 2020, http://donotclickthislink.org

     Stuff from Star*Line or Eye to the Telescope or any other SFPA-organized object doesn't count, and this is only for stuff that's actually available right now: if you've got something coming out in December, we'll catch it next month.  But if you've got an event in December—an online reading or contest or convention panel or a class you're teaching or something like that—send it in now so folks'll know it's happening before it happens.  Still, if it's already happened, let us know anyway.  The more, the merrier!

     Please use the format above—first name first, last name last—so I can just copy 'n' paste, and please get the notes to me by Saturday, December 5th.  I'll compile everything I get before the last minute of that day ticks by the U.S. east coast and dispatch the Big List by our various and sundry methods soon after that.

     Again, send stuff before December 5th to mpayne@... to be included in the November retrospective.

                             Mike


Re: Splitting profits for translation

F. J. Bergmann
 

My opinion is that the original author should get 50% regardless of how many translators are involved. Of course individual agreements can be negotiated.

F. J. Bergmann





On Nov 23, 2020, at 8:49 PM, Brian Garrison <haikooligan@...> wrote:

Who knows what a typical arrangement would look like when splitting profit on a translation? 


If it's just one author making a translation, I assume they might work out a deal with the original writer to share 50% of the income. But maybe a typical deal would balance that differently?


If there are two collaborators involved in the translation, would it make sense to shift that to 33% as an "even split"? Or would the original author be right to expect the same amount (e.g., the 50% assumed above) no matter how many folks were involved downstream?


Thanks for any examples you're willing to share in the group or individually!

Brian


Splitting profits for translation

Brian Garrison
 

Who knows what a typical arrangement would look like when splitting profit on a translation? 


If it's just one author making a translation, I assume they might work out a deal with the original writer to share 50% of the income. But maybe a typical deal would balance that differently?


If there are two collaborators involved in the translation, would it make sense to shift that to 33% as an "even split"? Or would the original author be right to expect the same amount (e.g., the 50% assumed above) no matter how many folks were involved downstream?


Thanks for any examples you're willing to share in the group or individually!

Brian


Re: nice sf haiga

John C. Mannone
 

Without the image, i do not see a poem, let alone a speculative one in the SFPA definition. However, with the image, i do see it as a speculative piece.


On Mon, Nov 23, 2020, 7:08 PM David Kopaska-Merkel <jopnquog@...> wrote:
I agree this poem is weak. I see a contrast between a violent past, and a peaceful future (represented by the background image). The function of the text, as I see it, is to identify the foreground image with the past and to define the difference between the two parts of the image as pertaining to time. This analysis means the poem has no cut and no aha. So it's neither a haiga nor good, but it is spec, if you accept this reasoning.

On Mon, Nov 23, 2020, 5:12 PM Joshua Gage via groups.io <pottygok=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The issue isn't "downtime" as a speculative term. I'd debate "widely used," but a quick Google search says they're known terms, so fine. Let's assume, then, that this is the speculative meaning of "downtime."

How, then, is the scifaiku working? What's the moment or the a-ha we're meant to come away with.?

This isn't a juxtapostion of images haiku, obviously, because there aren't any concrete images. 

Alternately, if "downtime" is the phrase and "the conflict rages" is the fragment, is this a context-action haiku? If "downtime" is the context, aka, "the past," how does "the conflict rages" shift focus or hone focus into a moment? How is this working as a scifaiku? 

Furthermore, is this a successful haiga if the interpretation is dependent on the artwork? Is the poem sufficiently distanced enough from the art to lead away or shift away from the art and create another synaptic leap for the reader?

It's an interesting discussion, to be sure, as to whether or not this is speculative. Again, I don't see it, but I'm willing to be convinced; however, if it is speculative, I don't see it as working well as a poem or a haiga. I think that's my concern with the speculative interpretation. Also, I don't think its a great non-speculative poem or haiga, but it technically works. It's not great, but one can at least see how it's working as a non-speculative poem. And the author is being aloof and giving us no clues, so maybe this is meant to work both ways, but I just don't see the speculative version or interpretation working as a scifaiku. 


Re: nice sf haiga

David Kopaska-Merkel
 

I agree this poem is weak. I see a contrast between a violent past, and a peaceful future (represented by the background image). The function of the text, as I see it, is to identify the foreground image with the past and to define the difference between the two parts of the image as pertaining to time. This analysis means the poem has no cut and no aha. So it's neither a haiga nor good, but it is spec, if you accept this reasoning.


On Mon, Nov 23, 2020, 5:12 PM Joshua Gage via groups.io <pottygok=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

The issue isn't "downtime" as a speculative term. I'd debate "widely used," but a quick Google search says they're known terms, so fine. Let's assume, then, that this is the speculative meaning of "downtime."

How, then, is the scifaiku working? What's the moment or the a-ha we're meant to come away with.?

This isn't a juxtapostion of images haiku, obviously, because there aren't any concrete images. 

Alternately, if "downtime" is the phrase and "the conflict rages" is the fragment, is this a context-action haiku? If "downtime" is the context, aka, "the past," how does "the conflict rages" shift focus or hone focus into a moment? How is this working as a scifaiku? 

Furthermore, is this a successful haiga if the interpretation is dependent on the artwork? Is the poem sufficiently distanced enough from the art to lead away or shift away from the art and create another synaptic leap for the reader?

It's an interesting discussion, to be sure, as to whether or not this is speculative. Again, I don't see it, but I'm willing to be convinced; however, if it is speculative, I don't see it as working well as a poem or a haiga. I think that's my concern with the speculative interpretation. Also, I don't think its a great non-speculative poem or haiga, but it technically works. It's not great, but one can at least see how it's working as a non-speculative poem. And the author is being aloof and giving us no clues, so maybe this is meant to work both ways, but I just don't see the speculative version or interpretation working as a scifaiku. 


Re: nice sf haiga

Joshua Gage
 

The issue isn't "downtime" as a speculative term. I'd debate "widely used," but a quick Google search says they're known terms, so fine. Let's assume, then, that this is the speculative meaning of "downtime."

How, then, is the scifaiku working? What's the moment or the a-ha we're meant to come away with.?

This isn't a juxtapostion of images haiku, obviously, because there aren't any concrete images. 

Alternately, if "downtime" is the phrase and "the conflict rages" is the fragment, is this a context-action haiku? If "downtime" is the context, aka, "the past," how does "the conflict rages" shift focus or hone focus into a moment? How is this working as a scifaiku? 

Furthermore, is this a successful haiga if the interpretation is dependent on the artwork? Is the poem sufficiently distanced enough from the art to lead away or shift away from the art and create another synaptic leap for the reader?

It's an interesting discussion, to be sure, as to whether or not this is speculative. Again, I don't see it, but I'm willing to be convinced; however, if it is speculative, I don't see it as working well as a poem or a haiga. I think that's my concern with the speculative interpretation. Also, I don't think its a great non-speculative poem or haiga, but it technically works. It's not great, but one can at least see how it's working as a non-speculative poem. And the author is being aloof and giving us no clues, so maybe this is meant to work both ways, but I just don't see the speculative version or interpretation working as a scifaiku. 


Re: Recommend a microphone for virtual readings, please

Akua Lezli Hope
 

I use a Blue Yeti USB Mic  its about 4 years old now — and a Dragonpad pop filter --
$130 and $13 on Amazon
I bought them for singing but this year they’ve been in near constant use.


--
Akua Lezli Hope
writing and dreaming from the ancestral land of the Onöndowa’ga:' also known as the Seneca, 
keepers of the Western Door, in the southern Finger Lakes region of New York State
www.akualezlihope.com


Re: Recommend a microphone for virtual readings, please

jublke9
 

This is a tangential request, but I was wondering if anyone had a recommendation for a nice microphone, nothing too fancy, that would work for an aspiring musician to plug into a laptop. Are all microphones good for all things or are there ones especially designed for music & singing over speech?

Off list, please, unless someone else is interested.

Thanks!
Julie K.
jublke@...

On Nov 23, 2020, at 12:30 PM, Wendy Van Camp <wvancamp@...> wrote:

I have a Yeti for recordings. It has a nice warm sound.


Re: Recommend a microphone for virtual readings, please

Wendy Van Camp
 

I have a Yeti for recordings.  It has a nice warm sound.  With proper acoustics, it is an excellent mic for your desk or sound booth.  However, for Zoom I find that it gets in the way for me personally.  I want the readers to see me and hopefully form a connection when I'm interviewed.  What I ended up doing is purchasing a pair of Anchor earpods.  Liberty 2 is the model.  They are similar in appearance and quality, but less expensive, than Apple earpods.  I get noise canceling and great audio to my ears, am able to turn off the speakers on my computer to help avoid feedback, and the mic on the earpods not only is directional to my voice, but it cleans up surrounding noise digitally.  They are designed to give a clean signal during phone calls.  The sound is not as warm as with the Yeti, but for Zoom I feel it is the better option.
--
Wendy Van Camp
Author - Poet - Illustrator
No Wasted Ink
http://nowastedink.com
wvancamp @ earthlink.net


November SFPA Updates

Lynne Sargent
 

Hi folks!

As per the recent newsletters, here are some updates from the SFPA:

1. There are just 9 days left in the voting for SFPA officers. Information on voting should be in your emails somewhere if you take a look for it! Voting is for members only.

2. The same thing goes for voting for this year's SFPA Grandmaster. There are four candidates this year: Linda Addison, F. J. Bergmann, Geoffrey Landis, and John Grey

3.  We are still looking for a new editor for Star*Line. If you are interested and would like to know more about what's involved in this volunteer position, please contact our interim Star*Line editor, F. J. Bergmann at starline@... .

Cheers!
Lynne


Re: Recommend a microphone for virtual readings, please

Christina M Rau
 

I agree with the Snowball mic. Super easy to use. I now use Rode, which is a bit pricier but comes with its own pop filter attached. I also have a fold-up mini-"booth" to put behind the mic to reduce background noise. 

Enjoy!

Christina

--
Christina M. Rau
www.christinamrau.com


Re: nice sf haiga

F. J. Bergmann
 

"Downtime" and "uptime" are terms that are widely used within SF to refer to time travel: "downtime" is toward the past, "uptime" toward the future.

F. J. Bergmann





On Nov 22, 2020, at 11:08 PM, Joshua Gage via groups.io <pottygok@...> wrote:

Okay, I see what you’re getting at in the image, but I still don’t see how this is speculative, now how “downtime” is being juxtaposed. I think that’s where I’m getting lost. If “downtime” is the past, as David has said, then what’s the juxtaposition? How is this working as a monoku, and then how does that work with the image?

Also, as I’ve pointed out earlier, if we use the ordinary definition of “downtime,” there’s a clear juxtaposition between the concept of rest and relaxation and the raging conflict. So to say it doesn’t work in the ordinary sense is just inaccurate. 


Re: Recommend a microphone for virtual readings, please

Herb Kauderer
 

I usually use a CAD U37 for online sound.  It is an inexpensive mic with a reasonably high floor on sound quality.  Bonus points for simplicity.

-Herb

On Monday, November 23, 2020, 02:08:18 AM EST, Diane Severson Mori <divadianepoetry@...> wrote:


I use a Blue Snowball. It is good quality and not too expensive. I bought it 12 years ago, so there might be others that are better/newer/shinier. But you can go from there. It’s about middle of the road.

Diane


--
Diane
Groups.io moderator
SFPA membership chair





Re: Recommend a microphone for virtual readings, please

Diane Severson Mori
 

I use a Blue Snowball. It is good quality and not too expensive. I bought it 12 years ago, so there might be others that are better/newer/shinier. But you can go from there. It’s about middle of the road.

Diane


--
Diane
Groups.io moderator
SFPA membership chair


Re: nice sf haiga

Joshua Gage
 

Okay, I see what you’re getting at in the image, but I still don’t see how this is speculative, now how “downtime” is being juxtaposed. I think that’s where I’m getting lost. If “downtime” is the past, as David has said, then what’s the juxtaposition? How is this working as a monoku, and then how does that work with the image?

Also, as I’ve pointed out earlier, if we use the ordinary definition of “downtime,” there’s a clear juxtaposition between the concept of rest and relaxation and the raging conflict. So to say it doesn’t work in the ordinary sense is just inaccurate. 


Speculative Sundays - Linda D. Addison Reading 11/22/20

Akua Lezli Hope
 

It was unalloyed joy, warmth and affirmation to hear Linda D. Addison read and discuss her 
moving, award-winning work.

If you missed it — you can watch the recording on Facebook here:

Joy in the making,
Akua

--
Akua Lezli Hope
writing and dreaming from the ancestral land of the Onöndowa’ga:' also known as the Seneca, 
keepers of the Western Door, in the southern Finger Lakes region of New York State
www.akualezlihope.com