Date   
Fw: Ceres Rail Company Competition

Les Smith
 


 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, November 06, 2017 9:14 AM
Subject: Ceres Rail Company Competition

Ceres to Mossel Bay
View this email in your browser
Dear CRC subscribers

Join the ultimate experience
Remember to book your ticket, limited seats available!

"NAME THE TRAINS" COMPETITION

Enter our biggest competition to date. Stand a chance to win an amazing trip on our trains from Ceres to Mossel Bay and back 1-4 December 2017.

Follow all the steps correctly to qualify for the lucky draw.

Competition end 17 November 2017. Winner will be announced 20 November 2017 via our Facebook Page.
Terms and Conditions Apply.

NOTE: If you book and pay, but win our competition...
we will gladly refund you!

STEPS:
1. LIKE our Facebook Page Ceres Rail Company

2. SHARE this post publicly on Facebook – make sure your setting are set to public for us to see

3. COMMENT WITH:
- NAME THE TRAINS: What are the names of the trains traveling on the Mossel Bay Trip? (hint – Ceres Rail Company Facebook Page)
- TAG 10 FRIENDS
- ADD THE HASHTAGS #ceresrailcompany #ceresrail

4. OPTIONAL For an additional entry to our draw - Follow us on Instagram @ceresrailcompany (This mean you have double the chance of winning)

TERMS AND CONDITIONS:
- Winner and partner both have to be available 1 – 4 December 2017 to be part of the trip
- The prize/s are not transferable, and no substitution or cash redemption of prize is permitted. The prize will not be handed/awarded to a third party, but only to the verified prize winner.
- Ceres Rail Company reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to substitute the prize with any other prize of comparable or greater commercial value for whatever reason.
- Ceres Rail Company reserves the right to amend these terms and conditions at any time without prior notice.

PRIZE INCLUDES:
- Train trip from Ceres to Mossel Bay and back
- All meals
- Accommodation (on the train)
- Transfers in Swellendam and Mossel Bay

PRIZE EXCLUDES:
- Traveling to Ceres and back home (safe parking available)
- Dining Car and Bar Car on the train for you own account

MOSSEL BAY TRIP - BOOK NOW
DO YOU WANT TO BE A GUINEA PIG?
We are 24 tickets up for grabs at a special price!
During our Guinea Pig Run to Mossel Bay, we will be have 24 tickets available to sleep on the train for an extra special experience.
BOOK A GUINEA PIG TICKET
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Copyright © 2017 Ceres Rail Company, All rights reserved.

Get in Touch:
079 077 5332
bookings@...
www.ceresrail.co.za



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Re: The Lowly Goods

John Sparkman
 

Wow Pierre – words escape me and I am left speechless – unlike you and your gifted writing.

Please keep these evocative stories coming.

 

Regards

 

John Sparkman

The Lowly Goods

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 


Pierre, 
Another lovely picture in words.. I was right there with you. I only saw re-enacted goods trains with both 14CRB 1882 and 15A 1970 on the Simonstown line, but your latest offering really fired the imagination.

Cheers, 
Robert.
Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.

Re: The Lowly Goods

Les Smith
 

Hi Pierre,
 
It's great to hear from you again on this list! 
 
 We've been missing your contributions which always brought back fond memories of a bygone era; your latest contribution being a shining example!
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, November 05, 2017 6:18 PM
Subject: [sar-l] The Lowly Goods

 

 

 

 

In 1953 when I was still a ‘pikkie’ of ten or so living in tiny, uncluttered Fish Hoek, The Anglo-Boer War and the way of life back then, seemed like a lifetime and another world ago yet since those years in the Cape much more time has passed compared to that period and great changes in lifestyle and our railways have taken place.

 

That was  more than 64 years ago yet it seems like yesterday. Just yesterday when we rode our bikes down to the seafront, onto the white beach sand surrounding the station in the hope of  finding a little 6th class shunting the goods. Quite often we were lucky. Apart from a few railwaymen who ignored us we were, my brother and I and maybe another pal, the only kids who seemed interested in watching trains.

SNIP.


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Re: The Lowly Goods

Dawie Kuyler
 

Hello Pierre and all. 
Thank you Pierre, like Quinten said, you took us back in time and that is just great. I could also hear the sounds and smell the smells. What a great era we lived in and you describe it so well.
Best regards, 
Dawie.

On 05 Nov 2017 21:16, "Quinten Pendle" <quinten@...> wrote:

Hi Pierre

 

As always, well put, making us feel like we’re transported back in time. One can almost smell the steam again, hear the clanking of couplings, screeching of wheels, … wow, you really are so gifted.

Keep’em coming!

 

All the best

Quinten Pendle

 

 

From: sar-l@groups.io [mailto:sar-l@groups.io] On Behalf Of Pierre And Corry
Sent: Sunday, November 05, 2017 6:18 PM
To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: [sar-l] The Lowly Goods

 

 

 

 

 

In 1953 when I was still a ‘pikkie’ of ten or so living in tiny, uncluttered Fish Hoek, The Anglo-Boer War and the way of life back then, seemed like a lifetime and another world ago yet since those years in the Cape much more time has passed compared to that period and great changes in lifestyle and our railways have taken place.

 

That was  more than 64 years ago yet it seems like yesterday. Just yesterday when we rode our bikes down to the seafront, onto the white beach sand surrounding the station in the hope of  finding a little 6th class shunting the goods. Quite often we were lucky. Apart from a few railwaymen who ignored us we were, my brother and I and maybe another pal, the only kids who seemed interested in watching trains.

 

We liked the goods trains for the simple reason that they behaved in interesting ways unlike the wooden suburbans which groaned past like clockwork. And they had a steamer hauling them! We liked them for their somnolence, loafing around the tiny station burping and farting and producing volumes of smoke and steam. The scrape of the coal shovel and the crew taking a cup of tea. One or two trucks to uncouple or to attach and a trundle onto one of a couple of goods lines, wheels grating and squealing on the sandy tracks. The odd shout or joking comment, a friendly place like most railway places where we watched and dreamed our days away.

 

The tiny subway bridge on the southern flank of Fish Hoek’s beach was a good place to stand under but it was more fun somehow standing there waiting for the Simons Town-bound goods to pass above. Then the rust flecks seemed to rain down that much faster off the old bridge and a cleaning dip in the ocean was called for after that.

 

Then there were our pennies. Preferably a worn-smooth Victorian penny with the old queen’s face fading into obscurity. These we slipped onto the tracks as the six came our way, little realising at the time that the old penny was a contemporary of the steam engine which was about to smooth every last wrinkle on Her Majesty’s face. Balmy, lazy days of childhood, and goods trains were then very much part of it.

 

Of course, the years passed by but things didn’t change then as rapidly as they do today. Farmers still needed tractors and ploughs and lorries and bakkies and they still needed to get their produce to market. Bales of lucerne had to either be ordered or sent away. Fertiliser, seed and fuel had to be delivered, Timber steel and tools, fencing and roofing, chickens and cattle, sheep and pigs – all went by rail. And then there was still parcel goods which we fetched or had delivered by natty, green articulated trucks, some even three wheelers to further fascinate the boy in us. Going back further in time, young lads would have seen their father’s goods off the railways being delivered by a steam lorry or a steam tractor hauling a trailer- full of parcels and boxes.

 

We didn’t have the plethora of wagons that Great Britain had, many of which bore the names of their private owners painted large on their wooden planks in a variety of lettering styles nor did we have wayside stations merely a few miles apart. We certainly couldn’t, unlike many a British or European schoolboy pedal down to the railway station as easily I did in Fish Hoek. Many a South African lad would have had to travel vast distances to arrive at a railway line and I daresay that for many a boy from Africa growing up on a farm, going into town to deliver goods for the railways to transport further must have been a great adventure. I do remember my own excitement on a farm holiday, going into town and seeing after many dusty miles, the pall of train smoke hanging over town. To the station we would go either to pick up something or to drop some goods off and there were the goods trucks waiting and the goods shed and maybe a shunting class 8 if we were lucky. The goods shed smelt nice too. Animal feed in hessian sacks and drums of petrol and the heady smell of creosote mixed with the smell of bagged meal. Sometimes a sheep or two or some live poultry or maybe cattle being loaded onto a silver cattle truck from silver loading pens. There was always a big scale too which we liked to hop onto, just to be chased off again and with this all, the sound of steam and the clang of shunting.

 

Sometimes the station was quiet. The men at the goods shed went about their business, sorting and checking and sniffing around like hounds and apart from their sounds all one could hear was an odd shout maybe and the ticking of hot steel from the goods vehicles in the yard. There may have been a farmer arriving with milk churns for the mixed goods about to arrive, his bakkie scrunching on the gravel and then the clang of the churns being off-loaded, or the deep-throated roar of a Diamond T Road Motor Services bus as it made its entrance into the goods yard and then sat throbbing in its cloud of dust. Maybe too the grunts and shouts of men off-loading sweet-smelling lucerne bails into a DZ or the growl of tractors rolling off a truck heading for the showroom at the local Co-op. Perhaps the whine of a flour mill would hang over the station yard right next to the big silo overlooking the tracks with a thousand greedy turtle doves feeding and fighting for the overflow from the railway trucks.

 

For me personally, there was nothing nicer than pulling into a station, large, small – it didn’t matter and observing the shunting of goods trucks by a steam engine. In the 50’s 60’s and even 70’s these duties would have been performed by a great variety of locomotives, many of them ancient. I have seen a 13th class shunting at the Pretoria railway workshops, eights shunting at Vryburg and Windhoek as well as sevens and sixes up in SWA and down in Cape Town. Natal had the ancient-looking H2 tank engines scuttling back and forth around the harbour in Durban. They all had their own characteristics and the weather also played a role in this, wreathing them in steam when it was cold or damp and leaving them starkly exposed on a hot, dry day.

 

Goods trains on a cold winter morning, goods trains in the dark of night. Riding the mixed goods with the smell of the merchandise drifting back into your compartment, the lowing of cattle, bleating of sheep. Goods trains of great variety with the need along the railway lines of yesteryear for  those goods to be cosseted, transported, delivered all over the country, hauled over mountain and plain by marvellous locomotion and served by men who relied on those goods continuing to be transported by rail so that their jobs were secure and our roads safer. Of course, this was not to be and we no longer are able to go down to the station to meet the goods train coming in. Mores the pity.

 

Pierre

Re: The Lowly Goods

Quinten Pendle <quinten@...>
 

Hi Pierre

 

As always, well put, making us feel like we’re transported back in time. One can almost smell the steam again, hear the clanking of couplings, screeching of wheels, … wow, you really are so gifted.

Keep’em coming!

 

All the best

Quinten Pendle

 

 

From: sar-l@groups.io [mailto:sar-l@groups.io] On Behalf Of Pierre And Corry
Sent: Sunday, November 05, 2017 6:18 PM
To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: [sar-l] The Lowly Goods

 

 

 

 

 

In 1953 when I was still a ‘pikkie’ of ten or so living in tiny, uncluttered Fish Hoek, The Anglo-Boer War and the way of life back then, seemed like a lifetime and another world ago yet since those years in the Cape much more time has passed compared to that period and great changes in lifestyle and our railways have taken place.

 

That was  more than 64 years ago yet it seems like yesterday. Just yesterday when we rode our bikes down to the seafront, onto the white beach sand surrounding the station in the hope of  finding a little 6th class shunting the goods. Quite often we were lucky. Apart from a few railwaymen who ignored us we were, my brother and I and maybe another pal, the only kids who seemed interested in watching trains.

 

We liked the goods trains for the simple reason that they behaved in interesting ways unlike the wooden suburbans which groaned past like clockwork. And they had a steamer hauling them! We liked them for their somnolence, loafing around the tiny station burping and farting and producing volumes of smoke and steam. The scrape of the coal shovel and the crew taking a cup of tea. One or two trucks to uncouple or to attach and a trundle onto one of a couple of goods lines, wheels grating and squealing on the sandy tracks. The odd shout or joking comment, a friendly place like most railway places where we watched and dreamed our days away.

 

The tiny subway bridge on the southern flank of Fish Hoek’s beach was a good place to stand under but it was more fun somehow standing there waiting for the Simons Town-bound goods to pass above. Then the rust flecks seemed to rain down that much faster off the old bridge and a cleaning dip in the ocean was called for after that.

 

Then there were our pennies. Preferably a worn-smooth Victorian penny with the old queen’s face fading into obscurity. These we slipped onto the tracks as the six came our way, little realising at the time that the old penny was a contemporary of the steam engine which was about to smooth every last wrinkle on Her Majesty’s face. Balmy, lazy days of childhood, and goods trains were then very much part of it.

 

Of course, the years passed by but things didn’t change then as rapidly as they do today. Farmers still needed tractors and ploughs and lorries and bakkies and they still needed to get their produce to market. Bales of lucerne had to either be ordered or sent away. Fertiliser, seed and fuel had to be delivered, Timber steel and tools, fencing and roofing, chickens and cattle, sheep and pigs – all went by rail. And then there was still parcel goods which we fetched or had delivered by natty, green articulated trucks, some even three wheelers to further fascinate the boy in us. Going back further in time, young lads would have seen their father’s goods off the railways being delivered by a steam lorry or a steam tractor hauling a trailer- full of parcels and boxes.

 

We didn’t have the plethora of wagons that Great Britain had, many of which bore the names of their private owners painted large on their wooden planks in a variety of lettering styles nor did we have wayside stations merely a few miles apart. We certainly couldn’t, unlike many a British or European schoolboy pedal down to the railway station as easily I did in Fish Hoek. Many a South African lad would have had to travel vast distances to arrive at a railway line and I daresay that for many a boy from Africa growing up on a farm, going into town to deliver goods for the railways to transport further must have been a great adventure. I do remember my own excitement on a farm holiday, going into town and seeing after many dusty miles, the pall of train smoke hanging over town. To the station we would go either to pick up something or to drop some goods off and there were the goods trucks waiting and the goods shed and maybe a shunting class 8 if we were lucky. The goods shed smelt nice too. Animal feed in hessian sacks and drums of petrol and the heady smell of creosote mixed with the smell of bagged meal. Sometimes a sheep or two or some live poultry or maybe cattle being loaded onto a silver cattle truck from silver loading pens. There was always a big scale too which we liked to hop onto, just to be chased off again and with this all, the sound of steam and the clang of shunting.

 

Sometimes the station was quiet. The men at the goods shed went about their business, sorting and checking and sniffing around like hounds and apart from their sounds all one could hear was an odd shout maybe and the ticking of hot steel from the goods vehicles in the yard. There may have been a farmer arriving with milk churns for the mixed goods about to arrive, his bakkie scrunching on the gravel and then the clang of the churns being off-loaded, or the deep-throated roar of a Diamond T Road Motor Services bus as it made its entrance into the goods yard and then sat throbbing in its cloud of dust. Maybe too the grunts and shouts of men off-loading sweet-smelling lucerne bails into a DZ or the growl of tractors rolling off a truck heading for the showroom at the local Co-op. Perhaps the whine of a flour mill would hang over the station yard right next to the big silo overlooking the tracks with a thousand greedy turtle doves feeding and fighting for the overflow from the railway trucks.

 

For me personally, there was nothing nicer than pulling into a station, large, small – it didn’t matter and observing the shunting of goods trucks by a steam engine. In the 50’s 60’s and even 70’s these duties would have been performed by a great variety of locomotives, many of them ancient. I have seen a 13th class shunting at the Pretoria railway workshops, eights shunting at Vryburg and Windhoek as well as sevens and sixes up in SWA and down in Cape Town. Natal had the ancient-looking H2 tank engines scuttling back and forth around the harbour in Durban. They all had their own characteristics and the weather also played a role in this, wreathing them in steam when it was cold or damp and leaving them starkly exposed on a hot, dry day.

 

Goods trains on a cold winter morning, goods trains in the dark of night. Riding the mixed goods with the smell of the merchandise drifting back into your compartment, the lowing of cattle, bleating of sheep. Goods trains of great variety with the need along the railway lines of yesteryear for  those goods to be cosseted, transported, delivered all over the country, hauled over mountain and plain by marvellous locomotion and served by men who relied on those goods continuing to be transported by rail so that their jobs were secure and our roads safer. Of course, this was not to be and we no longer are able to go down to the station to meet the goods train coming in. Mores the pity.

 

Pierre

The Lowly Goods

Pierre And Corry
 

 

 

 

 

In 1953 when I was still a ‘pikkie’ of ten or so living in tiny, uncluttered Fish Hoek, The Anglo-Boer War and the way of life back then, seemed like a lifetime and another world ago yet since those years in the Cape much more time has passed compared to that period and great changes in lifestyle and our railways have taken place.

 

That was  more than 64 years ago yet it seems like yesterday. Just yesterday when we rode our bikes down to the seafront, onto the white beach sand surrounding the station in the hope of  finding a little 6th class shunting the goods. Quite often we were lucky. Apart from a few railwaymen who ignored us we were, my brother and I and maybe another pal, the only kids who seemed interested in watching trains.

 

We liked the goods trains for the simple reason that they behaved in interesting ways unlike the wooden suburbans which groaned past like clockwork. And they had a steamer hauling them! We liked them for their somnolence, loafing around the tiny station burping and farting and producing volumes of smoke and steam. The scrape of the coal shovel and the crew taking a cup of tea. One or two trucks to uncouple or to attach and a trundle onto one of a couple of goods lines, wheels grating and squealing on the sandy tracks. The odd shout or joking comment, a friendly place like most railway places where we watched and dreamed our days away.

 

The tiny subway bridge on the southern flank of Fish Hoek’s beach was a good place to stand under but it was more fun somehow standing there waiting for the Simons Town-bound goods to pass above. Then the rust flecks seemed to rain down that much faster off the old bridge and a cleaning dip in the ocean was called for after that.

 

Then there were our pennies. Preferably a worn-smooth Victorian penny with the old queen’s face fading into obscurity. These we slipped onto the tracks as the six came our way, little realising at the time that the old penny was a contemporary of the steam engine which was about to smooth every last wrinkle on Her Majesty’s face. Balmy, lazy days of childhood, and goods trains were then very much part of it.

 

Of course, the years passed by but things didn’t change then as rapidly as they do today. Farmers still needed tractors and ploughs and lorries and bakkies and they still needed to get their produce to market. Bales of lucerne had to either be ordered or sent away. Fertiliser, seed and fuel had to be delivered, Timber steel and tools, fencing and roofing, chickens and cattle, sheep and pigs – all went by rail. And then there was still parcel goods which we fetched or had delivered by natty, green articulated trucks, some even three wheelers to further fascinate the boy in us. Going back further in time, young lads would have seen their father’s goods off the railways being delivered by a steam lorry or a steam tractor hauling a trailer- full of parcels and boxes.

 

We didn’t have the plethora of wagons that Great Britain had, many of which bore the names of their private owners painted large on their wooden planks in a variety of lettering styles nor did we have wayside stations merely a few miles apart. We certainly couldn’t, unlike many a British or European schoolboy pedal down to the railway station as easily I did in Fish Hoek. Many a South African lad would have had to travel vast distances to arrive at a railway line and I daresay that for many a boy from Africa growing up on a farm, going into town to deliver goods for the railways to transport further must have been a great adventure. I do remember my own excitement on a farm holiday, going into town and seeing after many dusty miles, the pall of train smoke hanging over town. To the station we would go either to pick up something or to drop some goods off and there were the goods trucks waiting and the goods shed and maybe a shunting class 8 if we were lucky. The goods shed smelt nice too. Animal feed in hessian sacks and drums of petrol and the heady smell of creosote mixed with the smell of bagged meal. Sometimes a sheep or two or some live poultry or maybe cattle being loaded onto a silver cattle truck from silver loading pens. There was always a big scale too which we liked to hop onto, just to be chased off again and with this all, the sound of steam and the clang of shunting.

 

Sometimes the station was quiet. The men at the goods shed went about their business, sorting and checking and sniffing around like hounds and apart from their sounds all one could hear was an odd shout maybe and the ticking of hot steel from the goods vehicles in the yard. There may have been a farmer arriving with milk churns for the mixed goods about to arrive, his bakkie scrunching on the gravel and then the clang of the churns being off-loaded, or the deep-throated roar of a Diamond T Road Motor Services bus as it made its entrance into the goods yard and then sat throbbing in its cloud of dust. Maybe too the grunts and shouts of men off-loading sweet-smelling lucerne bails into a DZ or the growl of tractors rolling off a truck heading for the showroom at the local Co-op. Perhaps the whine of a flour mill would hang over the station yard right next to the big silo overlooking the tracks with a thousand greedy turtle doves feeding and fighting for the overflow from the railway trucks.

 

For me personally, there was nothing nicer than pulling into a station, large, small – it didn’t matter and observing the shunting of goods trucks by a steam engine. In the 50’s 60’s and even 70’s these duties would have been performed by a great variety of locomotives, many of them ancient. I have seen a 13th class shunting at the Pretoria railway workshops, eights shunting at Vryburg and Windhoek as well as sevens and sixes up in SWA and down in Cape Town. Natal had the ancient-looking H2 tank engines scuttling back and forth around the harbour in Durban. They all had their own characteristics and the weather also played a role in this, wreathing them in steam when it was cold or damp and leaving them starkly exposed on a hot, dry day.

 

Goods trains on a cold winter morning, goods trains in the dark of night. Riding the mixed goods with the smell of the merchandise drifting back into your compartment, the lowing of cattle, bleating of sheep. Goods trains of great variety with the need along the railway lines of yesteryear for  those goods to be cosseted, transported, delivered all over the country, hauled over mountain and plain by marvellous locomotion and served by men who relied on those goods continuing to be transported by rail so that their jobs were secure and our roads safer. Of course, this was not to be and we no longer are able to go down to the station to meet the goods train coming in. Mores the pity.

 

Pierre

Re: Fw: 3407 where was it going

Franciscus Boshoff
 

--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 11/4/17, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [sar-l] Fw: 3407 where was it going
To: sar-l@groups.io
Date: Saturday, November 4, 2017, 7:27 PM

The Friday Trans-Karoo was steam
worked during the early 1990s, but it
changed to electric at Klerksdorp, not Potch.
At first one loco was used
though later
double-heading seemed to be the rule.

Attached taken from the train on 29 July 1993,
leaving Potch southbound.

Rollo


----- Original Message -----
From: "rickwoods" <chasrickwood@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 10:09 AM
Subject: [sar-l] Fw: 3407 where was it going


Bonjour from
France.
I have the following query from a
friend in uk. Can anyone confirm that this
was the time that spoonet were using steam on
the trans Karoo between joburg
and
potchefstroom. If I remember rightly steam worked out on the
Friday and
returned from Potch on the
Saturday morning. Any info welcome. Chas
Anyway I have a mystery I would like to consult
you on. On Saturday December
12th 1992 I
took a photo of 3407 at Jo'berg station. Copy attatched.
I seem
to
recall there was
a regular steam service from Joberg with one of the
museum
fleet. So my question is what was
this service ? Where did it go ? I am
certain
it wasn't a
magelisberg special. We did that with GMAM 4122.

Any help would be
appreciated.

Regards to
Juliette.

Richard




---
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has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com



Locos used on Transkaroo were 3404 , 3422 ,3472 ,3476 ,

3407 sold Ian Welch
3404 lease FOTR
3422 A/D
3472 LEASE REEFSTEAMERS
3476 LEASE MAINLINE STEAM

Re: Fw: 3407 where was it going

Rollo Dickson
 

The Friday Trans-Karoo was steam worked during the early 1990s, but it changed to electric at Klerksdorp, not Potch. At first one loco was used though later double-heading seemed to be the rule.

Attached taken from the train on 29 July 1993, leaving Potch southbound.

Rollo

----- Original Message -----
From: "rickwoods" <chasrickwood@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 10:09 AM
Subject: [sar-l] Fw: 3407 where was it going


Bonjour from France.
I have the following query from a friend in uk. Can anyone confirm that this was the time that spoonet were using steam on the trans Karoo between joburg and potchefstroom. If I remember rightly steam worked out on the Friday and returned from Potch on the Saturday morning. Any info welcome. Chas
Anyway I have a mystery I would like to consult you on. On Saturday December
12th 1992 I took a photo of 3407 at Jo'berg station. Copy attatched. I seem to
recall there was a regular steam service from Joberg with one of the museum
fleet. So my question is what was this service ? Where did it go ? I am certain
it wasn't a magelisberg special. We did that with GMAM 4122.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards to Juliette.

Richard




---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

Re: Fw: 3407 where was it going

Ashley Peter
 

That seems to be the Union Limited train set behind 3407 so suspect this might be a tour train setting off from JHB.


On Fri, Nov 3, 2017 at 10:13, rickwoods
<chasrickwood@...> wrote:
Bonjour from France. 
I have the following query from a friend in uk.  Can anyone confirm that this was the time that spoonet were using steam on the trans Karoo between joburg and potchefstroom. If I remember rightly steam worked out on the Friday and returned from Potch     on the Saturday morning.   Any info welcome.      Chas

Anyway I have a mystery I would like to consult you on. On Saturday December
12th 1992 I took a photo of 3407 at Jo'berg station. Copy attatched. I seem to
recall there was a regular steam service from Joberg with one of the museum
fleet. So my question is what was this service ? Where did it go ? I am certain
it wasn't a magelisberg special. We did that with GMAM 4122.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards to Juliette.


Richard

Fw: 3407 where was it going

rickwoods <chasrickwood@...>
 

Bonjour from France. 

I have the following query from a friend in uk.  Can anyone confirm that this was the time that spoonet were using steam on the trans Karoo between joburg and potchefstroom. If I remember rightly steam worked out on the Friday and returned from Potch     on the Saturday morning.   Any info welcome.      Chas

Anyway I have a mystery I would like to consult you on. On Saturday December
12th 1992 I took a photo of 3407 at Jo'berg station. Copy attatched. I seem to
recall there was a regular steam service from Joberg with one of the museum
fleet. So my question is what was this service ? Where did it go ? I am certain
it wasn't a magelisberg special. We did that with GMAM 4122.

Any help would be appreciated.

Regards to Juliette.


Richard

Re: Fw: Narrow Gauge World article - Last Rites of the Alfred County Railway

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Thanks, Les. I subscribe to NGW and was both saddened and quite angry at these events, especially as scrapping was so unnecessary and the ‘Barry’ saga has proven that with enough money nothing is beyond restoration.
 
Regards,
Robert.
 

From: Les Smith
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 2:18 PM
Subject: [sar-l] Fw: Narrow Gauge World article - Last Rites of the Alfred County Railway
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 10:44 AM
Subject: Narrow Gauge World article - Last Rites of the Alfred County Railway
 

Dear All,

 

We thought you might be interested in the attached article which appears in the current edition of Narrow Gauge World.

 

Mr. Myers made every effort to save these items and offered a premium over the scrap price.  It was surprising therefore they decided to scrap them.

 

Kind regards,

Louise Norton
Marketing Liaison

Sandstone Estates (Pty) Ltd



Fw: Narrow Gauge World article - Last Rites of the Alfred County Railway

Les Smith
 

 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, November 01, 2017 10:44 AM
Subject: Narrow Gauge World article - Last Rites of the Alfred County Railway

Dear All,

 

We thought you might be interested in the attached article which appears in the current edition of Narrow Gauge World.

 

Mr. Myers made every effort to save these items and offered a premium over the scrap price.  It was surprising therefore they decided to scrap them.

 

Kind regards,

Louise Norton
Marketing Liaison

Sandstone Estates (Pty) Ltd



Tel:
+27 11 805 4692 or +27 805 6530
Fax: +27 11 805 5209
Visit our website: www.sandstone-estates.com
"Preserving the best of our past for the future" 

Visit our Stars of Sandstone 2017 web site (www.starsofsandstone.com) to view photos taken during the event.  Click here to view.

 

The latest Stars of Sandstone 2017 video has just been released on YouTube – please click on the link below to view

https://youtu.be/937ZkuLyj7w

P Please consider whether it is necessary to print this email

 

 

 

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steam production

Patons Country Narrow Gauge Railway
 

Morning all,

Does anyone know what the steam production would be from an NGG 16 boiler at the various pressures?

Maybe a graph ?

Regards

Julian

Re: TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

Banana Express
 

Thanks André.  I don’t know why I didn’t think of looking there in the first place –senility creeping on I guess!

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

From: sar-l@groups.io [mailto:sar-l@groups.io] On Behalf Of André Kritzinger
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2017 15:16
To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sar-l] TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

 

Hi Peter,

 

 

Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115

 

Sent: 27 October, 2017 00:12

Subject: Re: [sar-l] TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

 

Hi All,

 

Auction 131 closed today and all except four of the loco and rolling stock lots were sold.  These were:

 

Lot 4: 3 wagons at Port Shepstone, KZN, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 14: 2 wagons at Noupoort, NC, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 64: 7 derailed wagons at Groenheuwel, WC, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 81: 2 locos (20-089 & 34-075) collision damage) at Flonker, EC.  (Only 20-089 was included in Sale 130 (as unsold Lot 81)).  The highest bid price was R107,500 which did not meet the reserve.  My thanks to John Middleton who provided me with details of the accident as follows:

 

“These locos were those involved in the horrendous Flonker accident 18/8/2016 when an unmanned 34.075 ran away from a loop further up the line (it had failed and been parked - still havn't seen any explanation as to why it wasn't chocked or why it ran away) and crashed at very high speed into 20089 on a train of ore empties. 20089 was actually on a driver training run and there were 4 people in the cab, it was stationary at the time and 3 managed to jump and were injured but the young trainee driver was killed.”

 

Prices realised varied between R1,438/t (Lot 21, 1 derailed wagon at Pendoring, Brits, NW) and R6,222/t (Lot 31, 15 Class 7E locos at Richards Bay).  The average return was R3,677/t.

 

I mentioned in my previous email that the 7E locos in Lot 31 were of the 7E1 and 7E3 variants. Having taken a closer look at the pics I see that examples of 7E4 are also included (rebuilds of 7E3’s with Hitachi microprocessor control and improved rheostatic brakes), along with E7253 and E7255 classified as 7E6. This latter classification is not included in the amendments to John Middleton’s book and amendment lists (presumably done later), so I would be grateful if John, or anyone else, can let us know  the differences of a 7E6.

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

From: Peter Bagshawe [mailto:banexacct@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 0:05
To: 'sar-l@groups.io'
Subject: TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

 

Hi All,

 

This auction closes on 26 October and is the usual mixture of wagons with a few locomotives thrown in.  It includes the following five lots which remained unsold from Sale 130:

 

Lot 3: was for 36 wagons at Cambridge, East London, EC, but is now increased to 88 wagons plus some side frames and bolsters.

Lot 4: 3 wagons at Port Shepstone, KZN

Lot 14: 2 wagons at Noupoort, NC

Lot 64: 7 derailed wagons at Groenheuwels, WC

Lot 81: Accident victim 20 089 (stripped internally) at Flonker, EC.  However, there is an addition to this one of a badly mangled 34 075, presumably part of the same accident. Their wheels and bogies are not included in the Sale.

 

Other locos included in the Sale are:

 

Lot 31: 15 Class 7E locos at Richards Bay (actually 7E1 & 7E3 variants) being sold with bogies. 7103/17/24/36/39/45/50/253/55/60/62/66/72/83/96 are shown as being partially stripped (traction motors, transformers and cubicles are missing from some locos).

 

Lot 43: 1 Class 10E1 loco (10161) at Koedoespoort, GP, partially stripped and being sold without bogies (it’s on carry bogies).

 

One service coach is included in the Sale – Lot 23 which covers 14815 at Heidelberg, GP, which is being sold with its bogies.

 

A few of the Lots cover derailed wagons.

 

Lot 17, which covered 9 wagons and 5 tankers at Welgedacht, Springs, GP, which was on display last night had gone by this evening, presumably withdrawn for some reason.

 

Finally, Lot 167 covers a “Rail Cart” at Transnet, Esselen Park, GP. However this is not wagon which runs on rails (it seems to have solid rubber tyres) so was presumably for carrying rails.

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

 

 

Image removed by sender.

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Re: TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

André Kritzinger
 

7E5, not 7E%...
 
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115
 

Sent: 27 October, 2017 15:15
Subject: Re: [sar-l] TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October
 
Hi Peter,
 
 
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115
 
Sent: 27 October, 2017 00:12
Subject: Re: [sar-l] TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October
 

Hi All,

 

Auction 131 closed today and all except four of the loco and rolling stock lots were sold.  These were:

 

Lot 4: 3 wagons at Port Shepstone, KZN, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 14: 2 wagons at Noupoort, NC, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 64: 7 derailed wagons at Groenheuwel, WC, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 81: 2 locos (20-089 & 34-075) collision damage) at Flonker, EC.  (Only 20-089 was included in Sale 130 (as unsold Lot 81)).  The highest bid price was R107,500 which did not meet the reserve.  My thanks to John Middleton who provided me with details of the accident as follows:

 

“These locos were those involved in the horrendous Flonker accident 18/8/2016 when an unmanned 34.075 ran away from a loop further up the line (it had failed and been parked - still havn't seen any explanation as to why it wasn't chocked or why it ran away) and crashed at very high speed into 20089 on a train of ore empties. 20089 was actually on a driver training run and there were 4 people in the cab, it was stationary at the time and 3 managed to jump and were injured but the young trainee driver was killed.”

 

Prices realised varied between R1,438/t (Lot 21, 1 derailed wagon at Pendoring, Brits, NW) and R6,222/t (Lot 31, 15 Class 7E locos at Richards Bay).  The average return was R3,677/t.

 

I mentioned in my previous email that the 7E locos in Lot 31 were of the 7E1 and 7E3 variants. Having taken a closer look at the pics I see that examples of 7E4 are also included (rebuilds of 7E3’s with Hitachi microprocessor control and improved rheostatic brakes), along with E7253 and E7255 classified as 7E6. This latter classification is not included in the amendments to John Middleton’s book and amendment lists (presumably done later), so I would be grateful if John, or anyone else, can let us know  the differences of a 7E6.

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

From: Peter Bagshawe [mailto:banexacct@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 0:05
To: 'sar-l@groups.io'
Subject: TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

 

Hi All,

 

This auction closes on 26 October and is the usual mixture of wagons with a few locomotives thrown in.  It includes the following five lots which remained unsold from Sale 130:

 

Lot 3: was for 36 wagons at Cambridge, East London, EC, but is now increased to 88 wagons plus some side frames and bolsters.

Lot 4: 3 wagons at Port Shepstone, KZN

Lot 14: 2 wagons at Noupoort, NC

Lot 64: 7 derailed wagons at Groenheuwels, WC

Lot 81: Accident victim 20 089 (stripped internally) at Flonker, EC.  However, there is an addition to this one of a badly mangled 34 075, presumably part of the same accident. Their wheels and bogies are not included in the Sale.

 

Other locos included in the Sale are:

 

Lot 31: 15 Class 7E locos at Richards Bay (actually 7E1 & 7E3 variants) being sold with bogies. 7103/17/24/36/39/45/50/253/55/60/62/66/72/83/96 are shown as being partially stripped (traction motors, transformers and cubicles are missing from some locos).

 

Lot 43: 1 Class 10E1 loco (10161) at Koedoespoort, GP, partially stripped and being sold without bogies (it’s on carry bogies).

 

One service coach is included in the Sale – Lot 23 which covers 14815 at Heidelberg, GP, which is being sold with its bogies.

 

A few of the Lots cover derailed wagons.

 

Lot 17, which covered 9 wagons and 5 tankers at Welgedacht, Springs, GP, which was on display last night had gone by this evening, presumably withdrawn for some reason.

 

Finally, Lot 167 covers a “Rail Cart” at Transnet, Esselen Park, GP. However this is not wagon which runs on rails (it seems to have solid rubber tyres) so was presumably for carrying rails.

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

 

Re: TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

André Kritzinger
 

Hi Peter,
 
 
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115
 

Sent: 27 October, 2017 00:12
Subject: Re: [sar-l] TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October
 

Hi All,

 

Auction 131 closed today and all except four of the loco and rolling stock lots were sold.  These were:

 

Lot 4: 3 wagons at Port Shepstone, KZN, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 14: 2 wagons at Noupoort, NC, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 64: 7 derailed wagons at Groenheuwel, WC, (also unsold at Sale 130)

Lot 81: 2 locos (20-089 & 34-075) collision damage) at Flonker, EC.  (Only 20-089 was included in Sale 130 (as unsold Lot 81)).  The highest bid price was R107,500 which did not meet the reserve.  My thanks to John Middleton who provided me with details of the accident as follows:

 

“These locos were those involved in the horrendous Flonker accident 18/8/2016 when an unmanned 34.075 ran away from a loop further up the line (it had failed and been parked - still havn't seen any explanation as to why it wasn't chocked or why it ran away) and crashed at very high speed into 20089 on a train of ore empties. 20089 was actually on a driver training run and there were 4 people in the cab, it was stationary at the time and 3 managed to jump and were injured but the young trainee driver was killed.”

 

Prices realised varied between R1,438/t (Lot 21, 1 derailed wagon at Pendoring, Brits, NW) and R6,222/t (Lot 31, 15 Class 7E locos at Richards Bay).  The average return was R3,677/t.

 

I mentioned in my previous email that the 7E locos in Lot 31 were of the 7E1 and 7E3 variants. Having taken a closer look at the pics I see that examples of 7E4 are also included (rebuilds of 7E3’s with Hitachi microprocessor control and improved rheostatic brakes), along with E7253 and E7255 classified as 7E6. This latter classification is not included in the amendments to John Middleton’s book and amendment lists (presumably done later), so I would be grateful if John, or anyone else, can let us know  the differences of a 7E6.

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

From: Peter Bagshawe [mailto:banexacct@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2017 0:05
To: 'sar-l@groups.io'
Subject: TFR Go-Dove Auction 131 of 26 October

 

Hi All,

 

This auction closes on 26 October and is the usual mixture of wagons with a few locomotives thrown in.  It includes the following five lots which remained unsold from Sale 130:

 

Lot 3: was for 36 wagons at Cambridge, East London, EC, but is now increased to 88 wagons plus some side frames and bolsters.

Lot 4: 3 wagons at Port Shepstone, KZN

Lot 14: 2 wagons at Noupoort, NC

Lot 64: 7 derailed wagons at Groenheuwels, WC

Lot 81: Accident victim 20 089 (stripped internally) at Flonker, EC.  However, there is an addition to this one of a badly mangled 34 075, presumably part of the same accident. Their wheels and bogies are not included in the Sale.

 

Other locos included in the Sale are:

 

Lot 31: 15 Class 7E locos at Richards Bay (actually 7E1 & 7E3 variants) being sold with bogies. 7103/17/24/36/39/45/50/253/55/60/62/66/72/83/96 are shown as being partially stripped (traction motors, transformers and cubicles are missing from some locos).

 

Lot 43: 1 Class 10E1 loco (10161) at Koedoespoort, GP, partially stripped and being sold without bogies (it’s on carry bogies).

 

One service coach is included in the Sale – Lot 23 which covers 14815 at Heidelberg, GP, which is being sold with its bogies.

 

A few of the Lots cover derailed wagons.

 

Lot 17, which covered 9 wagons and 5 tankers at Welgedacht, Springs, GP, which was on display last night had gone by this evening, presumably withdrawn for some reason.

 

Finally, Lot 167 covers a “Rail Cart” at Transnet, Esselen Park, GP. However this is not wagon which runs on rails (it seems to have solid rubber tyres) so was presumably for carrying rails.

 

Regards

Peter Bagshawe

 

 

Re: gca

Les Smith
 

Great stuff guys.
 
Thanks for keeping us in the loop.
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, October 27, 2017 2:30 AM
Subject: [sar-l] gca

Some progress with the completion of fitting the motion and fitting of the steam and exhaust pipes


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Re: gca

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Thanks for the update, guys. Well done!
 
Regards,
Robert.
 

Sent: Friday, October 27, 2017 1:30 AM
Subject: [sar-l] gca
 

Some progress with the completion of fitting the motion and fitting of the steam and exhaust pipes

gca

Patons Country Narrow Gauge Railway
 

Some progress with the completion of fitting the motion and fitting of the steam and exhaust pipes