Date   
Fw: Carte Blache - Sunday

du Preez
 

 
 

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Re: Emailing: Onrus Manor monthly Newsletter

Les Smith
 


Ha! Ha! -  N o Bill,  that was a bit before my time :-)
 
Cheers,
 
Les S.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, July 08, 2017 9:17 AM
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Emailing: Onrus Manor monthly Newsletter

Thanks Les - Interesting story.
That fireman with the coal - his name was not by any chance "Les"?
Cheers, Bill

On Fri, Jul 7, 2017 at 8:16 PM, Les Smith <smi1457@...> wrote:
Hi all,
 
I reside in a retirement village in Onrus, which is near Hermanus in the Western Cape. Our village produces it's own monthly newsletter which is called the "Manor News". I was quite surprised to  see the attached article on page 4 of the Newsletter.
 
Can anyone on this list confirm the story of the fast train trip from Klerksdorp to Johannesburg?
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
 
 



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Re: Emailing: Onrus Manor monthly Newsletter

William Smith
 

Thanks Les - Interesting story.
That fireman with the coal - his name was not by any chance "Les"?
Cheers, Bill

On Fri, Jul 7, 2017 at 8:16 PM, Les Smith <smi1457@...> wrote:
Hi all,
 
I reside in a retirement village in Onrus, which is near Hermanus in the Western Cape. Our village produces it's own monthly newsletter which is called the "Manor News". I was quite surprised to  see the attached article on page 4 of the Newsletter.
 
Can anyone on this list confirm the story of the fast train trip from Klerksdorp to Johannesburg?
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
 
 



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History by Locomotive 328

André Kritzinger
 

History by Locomotive no. 328 - 1983
* The first flight of the Space Shuttle Challenger takes place.
* The United States embassy bombing in Beirut kills 63 people.
* An Umkhonto we Sizwe car bomb explodes outside Air Force Headquarters in Pretoria, killing 19 and injuring 220.
* The South African Air Force retaliates by attacking African National Congress facilities in Maputo.
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115

Emailing: Onrus Manor monthly Newsletter

Les Smith
 

Hi all,
 
I reside in a retirement village in Onrus, which is near Hermanus in the Western Cape. Our village produces it's own monthly newsletter which is called the "Manor News". I was quite surprised to  see the attached article on page 4 of the Newsletter.
 
Can anyone on this list confirm the story of the fast train trip from Klerksdorp to Johannesburg?
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
 
 



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Re: Transnet - Phelophepa Health Care Train

Dave Richardson
 

Hi all,

 

In both these cases of lightly used lines TFR should be inspecting the line in advance regardless of the possibility of theft, there could be landslips etc. Just does not happen. With regard to Cullinan which is the lifeblood of FOTR, TFR says it has no budget to repair the 200m of missing track although FOTR have offered to do it as they have access to qualified personnel and materials. TFR refused them access.

 

Kind Regards

 

Dave Richardson

 


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History by Locomotive 327

André Kritzinger
 

History by Locomotive no. 327 - 1983
* High-ranking Nazi war criminal Klaus Barbie is arrested in Bolivia.
* Dieter Gerhardt is arrested by the Federal Bureau of Investigation in New York.
* Lotus 1-2-3 is released for IBM Personal Computer compatible computers.
* Giovanni Vigliotto goes on trial for multiple counts of bigamy involving 105 women.
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115

Crossing Wheel

Rollo Dickson
 

Many thanks, Harry -

I didn't have a photo of the crossing operating wheel and was very pleased to see yours.

It would have been instructive to build a Meccano representation of the transmission & linkage.

Cheers

Rollo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Harry Ostrofsky" <thehzos@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 3:58 PM
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing


Hi Rollo et al



See the capstan wheel below for operating the booms.



Taken at Newclare station many years ago.



Gone!!!



Harry O













Hi Rollo et





-----Original Message-----
From: sar-l@groups.io [mailto:sar-l@groups.io] On Behalf Of Rollo Dickson
Sent: 04 July 2017 13:48
To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing



Hi Bill -



The booms are worked by a vertically-mounted steel wheel about a metre in diameter. As the linkage is by rodding similar to that previously used to operate track points, and although the booms are counterweighted, considerable effort is needed.



York Road crossing at Muizenberg was worked from the high box on the Down platform, a substantial distance away. This one must have been tough to work.



The two pairs of crossings at Rosebank appear to have been operated by a single hand-wheel for each pair- heavy going indeed.



Rollo





----- Original Message -----

From: "William Smith" < <mailto:williamsmith204@...> williamsmith204@...>

To: < <mailto:sar-l@groups.io> sar-l@groups.io>

Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 9:15 AM

Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing





Hi Rollo
I had a feeling you would have some answers.
I seem to remember the signalman having to turn a large wheel to open the
booms?
This must have been quite an effort, especially at peak times.
Muizenberg also had a level crossing at the end of the station.
I cant quite remember how they were operated.
Bill
On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Rollo Dickson < <mailto:r.dickson@...> r.dickson@...>
wrote:
To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -
From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had
to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board
(MTAB).
Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to
eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by
multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24
hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth
topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.
It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the
crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the
railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the
way
of things - which tended to take several months - they prepared a new
list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact
that
the crossing is still there, today.
Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing,
maintenance
ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the
old
Cape Government Railways timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell
to pieces.
For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on
maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a
facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as
incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome,
hundred-year-old station building opposite.
Photos attached.
As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time
they
intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access
across
the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.
The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.
They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.
Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to
the
already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and
Rondebosch.
To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected
crossings -
Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond
these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a
small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was
totally unprotected - not even flashlights.
---
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History by Locomotive 326

André Kritzinger
 

History by Locomotive no. 326 - 1982
* Argentine military dictator Leopoldo Galtieri resigns in the wake of his country's defeat in the Falklands War.
* "God's Banker" Roberto Calvi, chairman of Banco Ambrosiano, is found hanging beneath Blackfriars Bridge in London.
* The first compact discs are released to the public in Germany.
* The United Freedom Front bombs offices of South African Airways in Elmont, NY and IBM in Harrison, NY.
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115

Transnet - Phelophepa Health Care Train

Les Smith
 

Hi all,
 
It appears that the Cullinan branch line is not the only one where railway lines are stolen overnight. Transnet's Phelophepa health care train was also derailed due to the theft of some track between Carolina and Machododorp last month. I assume that there is very little traffic currently using that line which gave the thieves ample time to cut and remove some rail?
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
 



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Re: Prasa v/s Swifambo

Glen Landsberg
 

What about the 24K gold toilet seats in these locos? They will obviously be retained by the various benefactors!!!!

Glen Landsberg
Atlanta, GA
USA




-----Original Message-----
From: Les Smith <smi1457@...>
To: sar-l <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Wed, Jul 5, 2017 10:52 am
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Prasa v/s Swifambo

Hi Andre,
 
Prasa made an advance payment to Swifambo for the complete order of locomotives. What is interesting is that the court has ordered Swifambo to return those locomotives already delivered to   Spain.
 
Cheers,
 
Les S.

Re: Prasa v/s Swifambo

Les Smith
 

Hi Andre,
 
Prasa made an advance payment to Swifambo for the complete order of locomotives. What is interesting is that the court has ordered Swifambo to return those locomotives already delivered to   Spain.
 
Cheers,
 
Les S.
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, July 05, 2017 2:05 PM
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Prasa v/s Swifambo

If my understanding of how much a billion is, is correct, those thirteen Afros cost us R200,000,000.00 each!
 
 
From: Les Smith
Sent: 05 July, 2017 13:37
Subject: [sar-l] Prasa v/s Swifambo
 

JOHANNESBURG — Two years after journalist Pieter-Louis Myburgh broke a story about deep-rooted corruption at Prasa, a court has ruled that the rail agency’s R3.5bn contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing be set aside. The tender became synonymous for delivering trains that were too tall for South African rail standards. The ruling is a vindication for corruption fighters and journalists such as Myburgh. The spotlight, inevitably, will now fall on Deputy Finance Minister Sfiso Buthelezi who was chair at Prasa at the time. When the story broke about the tall trains, Buthelezi famously said his hands are clean. However, reports have recently emerged about a Treasury investigation that found that Buthelezi and his Prasa board members should be criminally charged for contravening the PFMA Act in the awarding of at least 30 contracts. Out of 216 contracts worth R19bn, only 13 were found to be above board, according to reports. Add to that, Buthelezi also stands of accused of nepotism and having enriched himself amid reports that he and his brother directly benefited from Swifambo contracts. Now that he’s in Treasury, will that institution act? – Gareth van Zyl

By Pieter-Louis Myburgh, News24

Johannesburg – Prasa board chairperson Popo Molefe says the state-owned rail entity’s board feels vindicated by Monday’s High Court judgment to review and set aside the company’s controversial contract for new locomotives.

Johannesburg High Court Judge J Francis on Monday ruled that Prasa’s R3.5 billion contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing for new locomotives, which was signed in 2013, must be set aside. The contract value later ballooned to more than R5 billion, of which nearly R4 billion has been paid by Prasa to Swifambo.




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Re: Prasa v/s Swifambo

William Smith
 

Thanks Les - lets see what happens next????
Bill

On Wed, Jul 5, 2017 at 1:37 PM, Les Smith <smi1457@...> wrote:

JOHANNESBURG — Two years after journalist Pieter-Louis Myburgh broke a story about deep-rooted corruption at Prasa, a court has ruled that the rail agency’s R3.5bn contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing be set aside. The tender became synonymous for delivering trains that were too tall for South African rail standards. The ruling is a vindication for corruption fighters and journalists such as Myburgh. The spotlight, inevitably, will now fall on Deputy Finance Minister Sfiso Buthelezi who was chair at Prasa at the time. When the story broke about the tall trains, Buthelezi famously said his hands are clean. However, reports have recently emerged about a Treasury investigation that found that Buthelezi and his Prasa board members should be criminally charged for contravening the PFMA Act in the awarding of at least 30 contracts. Out of 216 contracts worth R19bn, only 13 were found to be above board, according to reports. Add to that, Buthelezi also stands of accused of nepotism and having enriched himself amid reports that he and his brother directly benefited from Swifambo contracts. Now that he’s in Treasury, will that institution act? – Gareth van Zyl

By Pieter-Louis Myburgh, News24

Johannesburg – Prasa board chairperson Popo Molefe says the state-owned rail entity’s board feels vindicated by Monday’s High Court judgment to review and set aside the company’s controversial contract for new locomotives.

Johannesburg High Court Judge J Francis on Monday ruled that Prasa’s R3.5 billion contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing for new locomotives, which was signed in 2013, must be set aside. The contract value later ballooned to more than R5 billion, of which nearly R4 billion has been paid by Prasa to Swifambo.




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Re: Prasa v/s Swifambo

André Kritzinger
 

If my understanding of how much a billion is, is correct, those thirteen Afros cost us R200,000,000.00 each!
 
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115
 

From: Les Smith
Sent: 05 July, 2017 13:37
Subject: [sar-l] Prasa v/s Swifambo
 

JOHANNESBURG — Two years after journalist Pieter-Louis Myburgh broke a story about deep-rooted corruption at Prasa, a court has ruled that the rail agency’s R3.5bn contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing be set aside. The tender became synonymous for delivering trains that were too tall for South African rail standards. The ruling is a vindication for corruption fighters and journalists such as Myburgh. The spotlight, inevitably, will now fall on Deputy Finance Minister Sfiso Buthelezi who was chair at Prasa at the time. When the story broke about the tall trains, Buthelezi famously said his hands are clean. However, reports have recently emerged about a Treasury investigation that found that Buthelezi and his Prasa board members should be criminally charged for contravening the PFMA Act in the awarding of at least 30 contracts. Out of 216 contracts worth R19bn, only 13 were found to be above board, according to reports. Add to that, Buthelezi also stands of accused of nepotism and having enriched himself amid reports that he and his brother directly benefited from Swifambo contracts. Now that he’s in Treasury, will that institution act? – Gareth van Zyl

By Pieter-Louis Myburgh, News24

Johannesburg – Prasa board chairperson Popo Molefe says the state-owned rail entity’s board feels vindicated by Monday’s High Court judgment to review and set aside the company’s controversial contract for new locomotives.

Johannesburg High Court Judge J Francis on Monday ruled that Prasa’s R3.5 billion contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing for new locomotives, which was signed in 2013, must be set aside. The contract value later ballooned to more than R5 billion, of which nearly R4 billion has been paid by Prasa to Swifambo.




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Prasa v/s Swifambo

Les Smith
 

JOHANNESBURG — Two years after journalist Pieter-Louis Myburgh broke a story about deep-rooted corruption at Prasa, a court has ruled that the rail agency’s R3.5bn contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing be set aside. The tender became synonymous for delivering trains that were too tall for South African rail standards. The ruling is a vindication for corruption fighters and journalists such as Myburgh. The spotlight, inevitably, will now fall on Deputy Finance Minister Sfiso Buthelezi who was chair at Prasa at the time. When the story broke about the tall trains, Buthelezi famously said his hands are clean. However, reports have recently emerged about a Treasury investigation that found that Buthelezi and his Prasa board members should be criminally charged for contravening the PFMA Act in the awarding of at least 30 contracts. Out of 216 contracts worth R19bn, only 13 were found to be above board, according to reports. Add to that, Buthelezi also stands of accused of nepotism and having enriched himself amid reports that he and his brother directly benefited from Swifambo contracts. Now that he’s in Treasury, will that institution act? – Gareth van Zyl

By Pieter-Louis Myburgh, News24

Johannesburg – Prasa board chairperson Popo Molefe says the state-owned rail entity’s board feels vindicated by Monday’s High Court judgment to review and set aside the company’s controversial contract for new locomotives.

Johannesburg High Court Judge J Francis on Monday ruled that Prasa’s R3.5 billion contract with Swifambo Rail Leasing for new locomotives, which was signed in 2013, must be set aside. The contract value later ballooned to more than R5 billion, of which nearly R4 billion has been paid by Prasa to Swifambo.




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History by Locomotive 325

André Kritzinger
 

History by Locomotive no. 325 - 1982
* In the Battle of Goose Green, British forces defeat a larger Argentine force.
* The 1982 Lebanon War begins when Israel invades southern Lebanon.
* The British RFA Sir Galahad is destroyed during the Bluff Cove Air Attacks.
* The Falklands War ends with the formal surrender of Argentine forces and liberation of the Falkland Islanders.
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115

Re: Kenilworth crossing

Harry Ostrofsky
 

Hi Rollo et al

 

See the capstan wheel below for operating the booms.

 

Taken at Newclare station many years ago.

 

Gone!!!

 

Harry O

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hi Rollo et

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: sar-l@groups.io [mailto:sar-l@groups.io] On Behalf Of Rollo Dickson
Sent: 04 July 2017 13:48
To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing

 

Hi Bill -

 

The booms are worked by a vertically-mounted steel wheel about a metre in diameter. As the linkage is by rodding similar to that previously used to operate track points, and although the booms are counterweighted, considerable effort is needed.

 

York Road crossing at Muizenberg was worked from the high box on the Down platform, a substantial distance away. This one must have been tough to work.

 

The two pairs of crossings at Rosebank appear to have been operated by a single hand-wheel for each pair- heavy going indeed.

 

Rollo

 

 

----- Original Message -----

From: "William Smith" <williamsmith204@...>

To: <sar-l@groups.io>

Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 9:15 AM

Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing

 

 

> Hi Rollo

> I had a feeling you would have some answers.

> I seem to remember the signalman having to turn a large wheel to open the

> booms?

> This must have been quite an effort, especially at peak times.

> Muizenberg also had a level crossing at the end of the station.

> I cant quite remember how they were operated.

> Bill

> On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...>

> wrote:

>> To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had

>> to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board

>> (MTAB).

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to

>> eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by

>> multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24

>> hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth

>> topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the

>> crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the

>> railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the

>> way

>> of things - which tended to take several months -  they prepared a new

>> list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact

>> that

>> the crossing is still there, today.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing,

>> maintenance

>> ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the

>> old

>> Cape Government Railways  timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell

>> to pieces.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on

>> maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a

>> facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as

>> incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome,

>> hundred-year-old station building opposite.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Photos attached.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time

>> they

>> intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access

>> across

>> the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to

>> the

>> already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and

>> Rondebosch.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected

>> crossings -

>> Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond

>> these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a

>> small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was

>> totally unprotected - not even flashlights.

>> 

>> 

>> 

>> 

> ---

> This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.

> http://www.avg.com

>

 

 

Re: Kenilworth crossing

William Smith
 

Thanks Rollo - always good to have your input.
Bill

On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 1:47 PM, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...> wrote:
Hi Bill -

The booms are worked by a vertically-mounted steel wheel about a metre in diameter. As the linkage is by rodding similar to that previously used to operate track points, and although the booms are counterweighted, considerable effort is needed.

York Road crossing at Muizenberg was worked from the high box on the Down platform, a substantial distance away. This one must have been tough to work.

The two pairs of crossings at Rosebank appear to have been operated by a single hand-wheel for each pair- heavy going indeed.

Rollo


----- Original Message ----- From: "William Smith" <williamsmith204@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 9:15 AM
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing


Hi Rollo
I had a feeling you would have some answers.
I seem to remember the signalman having to turn a large wheel to open the
booms?
This must have been quite an effort, especially at peak times.
Muizenberg also had a level crossing at the end of the station.
I cant quite remember how they were operated.
Bill

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...>
wrote:

To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had
to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board
(MTAB).



Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to
eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by
multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24
hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth
topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.



It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the
crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the
railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the way
of things - which tended to take several months -  they prepared a new
list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact that
the crossing is still there, today.



Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing, maintenance
ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the old
Cape Government Railways  timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell
to pieces.



For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on
maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a
facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as
incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome,
hundred-year-old station building opposite.



Photos attached.



As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time they
intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access across
the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.



The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.



They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.



Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to the
already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and
Rondebosch.



To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected crossings -
Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond
these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a
small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was
totally unprotected - not even flashlights.






---
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http://www.avg.com






Re: Kenilworth crossing

Rollo Dickson
 

Hi Bill -

The booms are worked by a vertically-mounted steel wheel about a metre in diameter. As the linkage is by rodding similar to that previously used to operate track points, and although the booms are counterweighted, considerable effort is needed.

York Road crossing at Muizenberg was worked from the high box on the Down platform, a substantial distance away. This one must have been tough to work.

The two pairs of crossings at Rosebank appear to have been operated by a single hand-wheel for each pair- heavy going indeed.

Rollo

----- Original Message -----
From: "William Smith" <williamsmith204@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 9:15 AM
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing


Hi Rollo
I had a feeling you would have some answers.
I seem to remember the signalman having to turn a large wheel to open the
booms?
This must have been quite an effort, especially at peak times.
Muizenberg also had a level crossing at the end of the station.
I cant quite remember how they were operated.
Bill

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...>
wrote:

To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had
to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board
(MTAB).



Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to
eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by
multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24
hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth
topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.



It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the
crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the
railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the way
of things - which tended to take several months - they prepared a new
list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact that
the crossing is still there, today.



Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing, maintenance
ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the old
Cape Government Railways timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell
to pieces.



For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on
maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a
facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as
incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome,
hundred-year-old station building opposite.



Photos attached.



As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time they
intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access across
the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.



The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.



They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.



Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to the
already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and
Rondebosch.



To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected crossings -
Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond
these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a
small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was
totally unprotected - not even flashlights.




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Re: GCA 2621 update

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Great news. Well done to all concerned.
 
Regards,
Robert
 

Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 5:44 AM
Subject: [sar-l] GCA 2621 update
 

Morning all. Just a short update and thanks to members on the list who have assisted.

Boiler has been inspected and found to be sound and in excellent condition. Most of the boiler mounts have been sourced and are being fitted – a far simpler task than with the NGG16.

We will be replacing the dome and carrying out the hydraulic. Incredibly we could have a boiler certificate before all the other parts have been fitted!!. We would obviously wait until she is ready to use in order to make maximum use of the 3 year period.

Will be posting a bit later news on the 19D 2669 as well as the Aloe trains.