Date   
Re: Kenilworth crossing

Rollo Dickson
 

Hi Bill -

The booms are worked by a vertically-mounted steel wheel about a metre in diameter. As the linkage is by rodding similar to that previously used to operate track points, and although the booms are counterweighted, considerable effort is needed.

York Road crossing at Muizenberg was worked from the high box on the Down platform, a substantial distance away. This one must have been tough to work.

The two pairs of crossings at Rosebank appear to have been operated by a single hand-wheel for each pair- heavy going indeed.

Rollo

----- Original Message -----
From: "William Smith" <williamsmith204@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 9:15 AM
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing


Hi Rollo
I had a feeling you would have some answers.
I seem to remember the signalman having to turn a large wheel to open the
booms?
This must have been quite an effort, especially at peak times.
Muizenberg also had a level crossing at the end of the station.
I cant quite remember how they were operated.
Bill

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...>
wrote:

To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had
to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board
(MTAB).



Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to
eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by
multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24
hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth
topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.



It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the
crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the
railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the way
of things - which tended to take several months - they prepared a new
list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact that
the crossing is still there, today.



Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing, maintenance
ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the old
Cape Government Railways timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell
to pieces.



For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on
maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a
facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as
incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome,
hundred-year-old station building opposite.



Photos attached.



As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time they
intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access across
the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.



The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.



They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.



Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to the
already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and
Rondebosch.



To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected crossings -
Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond
these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a
small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was
totally unprotected - not even flashlights.




---
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Re: GCA 2621 update

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Great news. Well done to all concerned.
 
Regards,
Robert
 

Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 5:44 AM
Subject: [sar-l] GCA 2621 update
 

Morning all. Just a short update and thanks to members on the list who have assisted.

Boiler has been inspected and found to be sound and in excellent condition. Most of the boiler mounts have been sourced and are being fitted – a far simpler task than with the NGG16.

We will be replacing the dome and carrying out the hydraulic. Incredibly we could have a boiler certificate before all the other parts have been fitted!!. We would obviously wait until she is ready to use in order to make maximum use of the 3 year period.

Will be posting a bit later news on the 19D 2669 as well as the Aloe trains.

Re: GCA 2621 update

Trevor Staats
 

Wow - that's great news!!! 

 

From: sar-l@groups.io [mailto:sar-l@groups.io] On Behalf Of Patons Country Narrow Gauge Railway
Sent: Tuesday, 4 July 2017 2:44 PM
To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: [sar-l] GCA 2621 update

 

Morning all. Just a short update and thanks to members on the list who have assisted.

Boiler has been inspected and found to be sound and in excellent condition. Most of the boiler mounts have been sourced and are being fitted – a far simpler task than with the NGG16.

We will be replacing the dome and carrying out the hydraulic. Incredibly we could have a boiler certificate before all the other parts have been fitted!!. We would obviously wait until she is ready to use in order to make maximum use of the 3 year period.

Will be posting a bit later news on the 19D 2669 as well as the Aloe trains.

Re: GCA 2621 update

Nigel Randall
 

Well I can only compliment you on the progress you have made. Must be a big relief to know that the boiler is sound.

Regards
Nigel Randall

Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 6:44 AM, Patons Country Narrow Gauge Railway <kznrail@...> wrote:

Morning all. Just a short update and thanks to members on the list who have assisted.

Boiler has been inspected and found to be sound and in excellent condition. Most of the boiler mounts have been sourced and are being fitted – a far simpler task than with the NGG16.

We will be replacing the dome and carrying out the hydraulic. Incredibly we could have a boiler certificate before all the other parts have been fitted!!. We would obviously wait until she is ready to use in order to make maximum use of the 3 year period.

Will be posting a bit later news on the 19D 2669 as well as the Aloe trains.


Re: Kenilworth crossing

William Smith
 

Hi Rollo
I had a feeling you would have some answers.
I seem to remember the signalman having to turn a large wheel to open the booms?
This must have been quite an effort, especially at peak times.
Muizenberg also had a level crossing at the end of the station.
I cant quite remember how they were operated.
Bill

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:04 PM, Rollo Dickson <r.dickson@...> wrote:
To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board (MTAB).



Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24 hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.



It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the way of things - which tended to take several months -  they prepared a new list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact that the crossing is still there, today.



Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing, maintenance ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the old Cape Government Railways  timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell to pieces.



For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome, hundred-year-old station building opposite.



Photos attached.



As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time they intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access across the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.



The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.



They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.



Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to the already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and Rondebosch.



To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected crossings - Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was totally unprotected - not even flashlights.




GCA 2621 update

Patons Country Narrow Gauge Railway
 

Morning all. Just a short update and thanks to members on the list who have assisted.

Boiler has been inspected and found to be sound and in excellent condition. Most of the boiler mounts have been sourced and are being fitted – a far simpler task than with the NGG16.

We will be replacing the dome and carrying out the hydraulic. Incredibly we could have a boiler certificate before all the other parts have been fitted!!. We would obviously wait until she is ready to use in order to make maximum use of the 3 year period.

Will be posting a bit later news on the 19D 2669 as well as the Aloe trains.

Re: Kenilworth crossing

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Here, here or is it hear, hear!
Cheers, Robert

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.
  Original Message  
From: Les Smith
Sent: Monday, 3 July 2017 20:01
To: sar-l@groups.io
Reply To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing

Hi Rollo and List,

Thank you for the very interesting background to the Kenilworth crossing as
well as the great photos.

Regards,

Les S.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rollo Dickson" <r.dickson@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, July 03, 2017 20:04
Subject: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing


To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had
to
be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board
(MTAB).
SNIP.

Metrorail operations..

Rollo Dickson
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Somebody in the WWW" <microchips@...>
Subject: Some random questions about different Metrorail operations..

Some random answers:
As far as East London is concerned, class 7E electric unitsd were used on the suburban trains for a time. I suspect the unnecessary over powering was unwarranted as too few 7Es were available for main-line freights. Today there are even fewer, so there is no question of allocating any to suburban use. The overhead here is 25kV AC, so 3kV motor coaches as used in CT, Jbg and Dbn would not be suitable. Casual rides on East London trains are not recommended .

During the 1990s, consultants suggested diesel multiple-unts for both Port Elizabeth & East London - and for the diesel-hauled sets from CT to Malmesbury - but these did not eventuate.

Cape Town uses mostly 5M2A suburban emus, many of which have been rebodied with various differing details. Many coaches are in poor condition, grafitti is everywhere and coaches sufficient for 11 complete trains have been destroyed thrioough arson by disgruntled commuters. Eight coaches were burned in CT central station on 12 June 2017 because no trains at all had run for several hours due to power failure. Platforms 15 & 16 were wrecked and are currently out of use.

About 15 years ago, 11 eight-car CT sets were stripped and the underframes used for rebodying in a completely new corrosion-free design with centrally placed single windscreen by Bombardier. These were reclassified 10M3. Only one or two sets are still in operation, according to reports.

Class 8M Hitachi sets are also in use. Delivered in 1990/91, nothing new has arrived since.The shortage of rolling stock results in daily cancellation of several trains. Huge problems are experienced with vandalism - mainly affecting signalling.

A similar stripping and rebodying procedure in Johannesburg was reclassified 10M4. These are noted for a red stripe which tapers centrally at each end.

New 10M5 sets, resmbling the 10M3 in exterior design, are in use in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban.


----- Original Message -----
From: "Somebody in the WWW" <microchips@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, July 03, 2017 5:57 PM
Subject: [sar-l] Some random questions about different Metrorail operations..


Just a few random queries I have in my mind..

1 - The 5M2A sets used in Cape Town seem to have been modernised in a different way to the Gauteng sets, different design of the side of the carriages and doors. Anybody else know what I mean? Not sure the reason for this.

2 - East London to Berlin trains seem to run with a diesel loco hauling converted electric cars, just like the Port Elizabeth service, but the line looks to be electrified? Is there a voltage difference that prevents them from using EMUs (or electric locos) down there?

And on that subject, has anybody used that service? Nice place to go for a train ride.. or not?

3 - What's the situation like in Gauteng? The trains running there seem to be in generally better external condition than the sets in Cape Town, but is catching the train there considered off limits to anyone who values their safety? Is it too dangerous for a middle class civilian to consider catching a train in Metro Plus even in peak hour? I have noticed that there is far less enthusiast coverage of this system online compared to in the cape.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

Re: Kenilworth crossing

Les Smith
 

Hi Rollo and List,

Thank you for the very interesting background to the Kenilworth crossing as well as the great photos.

Regards,

Les S.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Rollo Dickson" <r.dickson@...>
To: <sar-l@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, July 03, 2017 20:04
Subject: [sar-l] Kenilworth crossing


To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had to
be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board
(MTAB).
SNIP.

Kenilworth crossing

Rollo Dickson
 

To add to the recent coverage of Kenilworth level crossing -



From the early nineteen-eighties, all new transport-related projects had to be reported to the newly formed Metropolitan Transport Advisory Board (MTAB).



Well, the railways drew up a wish-list of crossings they wanted to eliminate. Their planning experts in Johannesburg prioritised things by multiplying the number of trains scheduled across each crossing every 24 hours by the number of road vehicles counted. On this basis, Kenilworth topped the list and its impending closure was publicised.



It was pointed out at an MTAB meeting when the list was tabled that the crossing was not open during peak hours. Clearly unaware of this, the railway people went back to the drawing board and recalculated. In the way of things - which tended to take several months - they prepared a new list. Kenilworth now moved to the bottom. Which accounts for the fact that the crossing is still there, today.



Meanwhile, anticipating early agreement to close the crossing, maintenance ceased and in the long Cape winter (it used to rain in those days) the old Cape Government Railways timber signal cabin gently rotted away and fell to pieces.



For some months the crossing had to remain closed while they caught up on maintenance (by now the booms were becoming dangerous) and erected a facebrick monstrosity cabin with monopitch corrugated iron roof, about as incongruous a neighbour that could be contrived for the handsome, hundred-year-old station building opposite.



Photos attached.



As a matter of interest, no alternative road was proposed at the time they intended to close the crossing. This would have meant no road access across the line between Wynberg and Claremont, quite a few kilometres.



The railways didn't seem concerned about road users.



They weren't concerned in the early sixties at Rosebank.



Here there were five crossings whose closure displaced road traffic to the already overloaded existing bridges on either side - at Mowbray and Rondebosch.



To the north of Rosebank station there were two boom-protected crossings - Ryan Road and Alma - both controlled ftrom the station signal box. Beyond these were crossings at Liesbeeck Road and York, with booms worked from a small gatekeeper's shack. South of the station, Nursery Road crossing was totally unprotected - not even flashlights.

Re: Some random questions about different Metrorail operations..

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Only part of that I can answer is the East London bit. The Springfontein-East London line is/was electrified on the 25KV /AC system, whereas 5M2A‎ etc. units are 3KV / DC. EL suburban trains have always been loco-hauled. Previously, they used steam on slam door stock, then diesels, now hauling old EMU trailers. 
 Regards, 
Robert
Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.
From: Somebody in the WWW‎
Sent: Monday, 3 July 2017 16:57
To: sar-l@groups.io
Reply To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: [sar-l] Some random questions about different Metrorail operations..

Just a few random queries I have in my mind..

1 - The 5M2A sets used in Cape Town seem to have been modernised in a different way to the Gauteng sets, different design of the side of the carriages and doors. Anybody else know what I mean? Not sure the reason for this.

2 - East London to Berlin trains seem to run with a diesel loco hauling converted electric cars, just like the Port Elizabeth service, but the line looks to be electrified? Is there a voltage difference that prevents them from using EMUs (or electric locos) down there?

And on that subject, has anybody used that service? Nice place to go for a train ride.. or not?

3 - What's the situation like in Gauteng? The trains running there seem to be in generally better external condition than the sets in Cape Town, but is catching the train there considered off limits to anyone who values their safety? Is it too dangerous for a middle class civilian to consider catching a train in Metro Plus even in peak hour? I have noticed that there is far less enthusiast coverage of this system online compared to in the cape.

Some random questions about different Metrorail operations..

Oscar V
 

Just a few random queries I have in my mind..

1 - The 5M2A sets used in Cape Town seem to have been modernised in a different way to the Gauteng sets, different design of the side of the carriages and doors. Anybody else know what I mean? Not sure the reason for this.

2 - East London to Berlin trains seem to run with a diesel loco hauling converted electric cars, just like the Port Elizabeth service, but the line looks to be electrified? Is there a voltage difference that prevents them from using EMUs (or electric locos) down there?

And on that subject, has anybody used that service? Nice place to go for a train ride.. or not?

3 - What's the situation like in Gauteng? The trains running there seem to be in generally better external condition than the sets in Cape Town, but is catching the train there considered off limits to anyone who values their safety? Is it too dangerous for a middle class civilian to consider catching a train in Metro Plus even in peak hour? I have noticed that there is far less enthusiast coverage of this system online compared to in the cape.

Re: CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Robert Maidment-Wilson
 

Peter et al, 
I was gearing up to do one of Boon's trips when it all came to an end. Such a pity. On the subject of price; presumably the difference is down to a combination of inflation‎ and Boon using Diesel, whereas CR will be using steam?
Regards, 
Robert.

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.
From: Peter Sinclair
Sent: Monday, 3 July 2017 07:12
To: sar-l@groups.io
Reply To: sar-l@groups.io
Subject: Re: [sar-l] CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Did that same trip in September 2004, boarding and alighting at Worcester, with Boon's Bushveld Train Safaris for less than a quarter of that price. Two bus excursions and meals included - sleeping aboard the train at Graafwater. 
Golden opportunities squandered - you don't value what you have got till it is gone forever!
West Coast flowers at their best - presented on a plate by a true gentleman.

Re: CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

William Smith
 

Hi Peter and all
I also did that trip from Johannesburg.
Wonderful - 7 days, sleeping on the train, all meals, bus trips etc R4500
Those were the days.
Bill

On Mon, Jul 3, 2017 at 8:12 AM, Peter Sinclair <pddsinclair@...> wrote:
Did that same trip in September 2004, boarding and alighting at Worcester, with Boon's Bushveld Train Safaris for less than a quarter of that price. Two bus excursions and meals included - sleeping aboard the train at Graafwater. 
Golden opportunities squandered - you don't value what you have got till it is gone forever!
West Coast flowers at their best - presented on a plate by a true gentleman.


Re: CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Les Smith
 


Morning Peter,
 
Yes Indeed; Boon was a true scholar and a gentleman.
 
I also had the good fortune to have joined him on many of his trips.
 
Kind regards,
 
Les S.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, July 03, 2017 08:12
Subject: Re: [sar-l] CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Did that same trip in September 2004, boarding and alighting at Worcester, with Boon's Bushveld Train Safaris for less than a quarter of that price. Two bus excursions and meals included - sleeping aboard the train at Graafwater. 
Golden opportunities squandered - you don't value what you have got till it is gone forever!
West Coast flowers at their best - presented on a plate by a true gentleman.

Re: CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Peter Sinclair
 

Did that same trip in September 2004, boarding and alighting at Worcester, with Boon's Bushveld Train Safaris for less than a quarter of that price. Two bus excursions and meals included - sleeping aboard the train at Graafwater. 
Golden opportunities squandered - you don't value what you have got till it is gone forever!
West Coast flowers at their best - presented on a plate by a true gentleman.

History by Locomotive 324

André Kritzinger
 

History by Locomotive no. 324 - 1982
* The nuclear submarine HMS Conqueror sinks the Argentine cruiser General Belgrano.
* HMS Sheffield is hit by an Exocet missile, burns out of control and sinks.
* HMS Ardent is sunk by Argentine aircraft, killing 22 sailors.
* British ships HMS Coventry and SS Atlantic Conveyor are sunk.
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115

Re: CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Les Smith
 


Morning Len,
 
Thank you for keeping this list updated, much appreciated.
 
Regards,
 
Les S.
 

----- Original Message -----
From: du Preez
Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2017 10:12
Subject: [sar-l] CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

Ceres rail company trip to the west coast as per their website: WEST COAST FLOWER TRIP
18– 20 August 2017 – R 5950-00 per person sharing

Departing from Royal Cape Yacht Club, Cape Town Harbour, the morning of 18 August 2017 to Graafwater.

On Arrival in Graafwater passengers will be transferred by bus via a scenic route to either Clanwilliam – or Lambertsbay Hotel.

Busses will transport passengers back to Graafwater the morning of 19 August where the train will depart for Klawer and return to Graafwater. Passengers will be transported by bus via a scenic route to their respective hotels that afternoon.

On the morning of the 20th passengers will be transported back to Graafwater, where the train will depart for Cape Town.

All train trips, bus transfers, breakfast, dinner and accommodation for the two nights are included in this package.

For bookings call 079 077 5332 or email events@...


Virus-free. www.avast.com

CERES RAILWAY CO - WEST COAT FLOWER TRIP

du Preez
 

Ceres rail company trip to the west coast as per their website: WEST COAST FLOWER TRIP
18– 20 August 2017 – R 5950-00 per person sharing

Departing from Royal Cape Yacht Club, Cape Town Harbour, the morning of 18 August 2017 to Graafwater.

On Arrival in Graafwater passengers will be transferred by bus via a scenic route to either Clanwilliam – or Lambertsbay Hotel.

Busses will transport passengers back to Graafwater the morning of 19 August where the train will depart for Klawer and return to Graafwater. Passengers will be transported by bus via a scenic route to their respective hotels that afternoon.

On the morning of the 20th passengers will be transported back to Graafwater, where the train will depart for Cape Town.

All train trips, bus transfers, breakfast, dinner and accommodation for the two nights are included in this package.

For bookings call 079 077 5332 or email events@...


Virus-free. www.avast.com

History by Locomotive 323

André Kritzinger
 

History by Locomotive no. 323 - 1982
* The South African Navy frigate SAS President Kruger sinks with the loss of 16 lives after colliding with SAS Tafelberg.
* The South African Defence Force's Operation Super takes place.
* The Falklands War begins when Argentina invades and occupies the Falkland Islands.
* British troops retake South Georgia during Operation Paraquet.
Regards,
André, Cape Town
Converted from Horribly Oversized to Nano in 1978
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_African_locomotive_history
http://grela.rrpicturearchives.net/
http://www.railpictures.net/showphotos.php?userid=12115