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[railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] New book from Pen & Sword in UK on rail guns


dawn.pillans@btinternet.com
 

Alas, it's unavailable on Amazon despite the August 2016 publication date! Not sure if that means it was so popular that it sold out, or that they didn't expect much interest and printed few copies!

Happy New Year to all!

Dawn 

Sent from my iPhone

On 1 Jan 2017, at 11:20, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

 

Railway Guns (Hardback)

British and German Guns at War

 

In the nineteenth century the War Office showed little interest in developing large heavy artillery for its land forces, preferring instead to equip its warships with the biggest guns. Private initiatives to mount a gun on a railway truck pulled by a steam engine were demonstrated before military chiefs in the Southern Counties, but not taken up. However, the development of longer-range guns, weighing up to 250 tons, to smash through the massive armies and trench systems on the Western Front in 1916, led to a rethink. The only way to move these monsters about quickly in countryside thick with mud was to mount them on specially built railway trucks towed by locomotives.

The railway guns were to be put on little-used country lines where they could fire on beaches, road junctions and harbours. The locations and cooperation given by the independent railway companies is explained, as are the difficulties of using the same lines for war and civilian traffic.

The First World War also saw the emergence of large training camps for railway men. When the war ended most railway guns were dismantled and lost in ordnance depots. The Army Council was uncertain about artillery needs in a future war, so training, and development stopped.

This book largely concentrates on the realities of the time, the type of gun, the locomotives, artillery targets, locations, and what it was like when firing took place. It is fully illustrated with pictures, maps and plans covering different aspects of railway guns their locomotives and equipment.

Railway Guns
 
 
 



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Gordon Angus Mackinlay
 

If you look at the link provided, the blurb will tell you that the book will be published on 17 February 2017.
 
And buying from publisher pre that date will give a saving of four pounds.  Also the company, Pen & Sword is British owned, produces its product in the UK, and buying direct helps keep Britons in employment.
 
Amazon and with other such online book suppliers are now all American owned, they all take the publisher to the barest margin.
 
While such as ABE, with their excessive credit card cards are starting to send the small book dealers to the wall.  In their fight back a lot are now refusing credit cards so ABE (and others) do not get the book sellers to pay such, and you pay by direct bank charge (not Paypal which is also a rip off for the dealer, and as the Australian Federal Police inform us, is insecure!)
Yours,
MACKINLAY  New South Wales
 

Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2017 11:04 PM
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] New book from Pen & Sword in UK on rail guns
 


Alas, it's unavailable on Amazon despite the August 2016 publication date! Not sure if that means it was so popular that it sold out, or that they didn't expect much interest and printed few copies!

Happy New Year to all!

Dawn 
 
Sent from my iPhone

On 1 Jan 2017, at 11:20, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 
 

Railway Guns (Hardback)

British and German Guns at War

 

In the nineteenth century the War Office showed little interest in developing large heavy artillery for its land forces, preferring instead to equip its warships with the biggest guns. Private initiatives to mount a gun on a railway truck pulled by a steam engine were demonstrated before military chiefs in the Southern Counties, but not taken up. However, the development of longer-range guns, weighing up to 250 tons, to smash through the massive armies and trench systems on the Western Front in 1916, led to a rethink. The only way to move these monsters about quickly in countryside thick with mud was to mount them on specially built railway trucks towed by locomotives.

The railway guns were to be put on little-used country lines where they could fire on beaches, road junctions and harbours. The locations and cooperation given by the independent railway companies is explained, as are the difficulties of using the same lines for war and civilian traffic.

The First World War also saw the emergence of large training camps for railway men. When the war ended most railway guns were dismantled and lost in ordnance depots. The Army Council was uncertain about artillery needs in a future war, so training, and development stopped.

This book largely concentrates on the realities of the time, the type of gun, the locomotives, artillery targets, locations, and what it was like when firing took place. It is fully illustrated with pictures, maps and plans covering different aspects of railway guns their locomotives and equipment.

Railway Guns
 
 
 



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lru29
 

According to the response I got from Amazon This title will be released on June 2, 2017. It looks like publication has been delayed but you can pre order it on Amazon
Lee

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 1, 2017, at 7:01 AM, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

If you look at the link provided, the blurb will tell you that the book will be published on 17 February 2017.
 
And buying from publisher pre that date will give a saving of four pounds.  Also the company, Pen & Sword is British owned, produces its product in the UK, and buying direct helps keep Britons in employment.
 
Amazon and with other such online book suppliers are now all American owned, they all take the publisher to the barest margin.
 
While such as ABE, with their excessive credit card cards are starting to send the small book dealers to the wall.  In their fight back a lot are now refusing credit cards so ABE (and others) do not get the book sellers to pay such, and you pay by direct bank charge (not Paypal which is also a rip off for the dealer, and as the Australian Federal Police inform us, is insecure!)
Yours,
MACKINLAY  New South Wales
 
Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2017 11:04 PM
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] New book from Pen & Sword in UK on rail guns
 


Alas, it's unavailable on Amazon despite the August 2016 publication date! Not sure if that means it was so popular that it sold out, or that they didn't expect much interest and printed few copies!

Happy New Year to all!

Dawn 
 
Sent from my iPhone

On 1 Jan 2017, at 11:20, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 
 

Railway Guns (Hardback)

British and German Guns at War

 

In the nineteenth century the War Office showed little interest in developing large heavy artillery for its land forces, preferring instead to equip its warships with the biggest guns. Private initiatives to mount a gun on a railway truck pulled by a steam engine were demonstrated before military chiefs in the Southern Counties, but not taken up. However, the development of longer-range guns, weighing up to 250 tons, to smash through the massive armies and trench systems on the Western Front in 1916, led to a rethink. The only way to move these monsters about quickly in countryside thick with mud was to mount them on specially built railway trucks towed by locomotives.

The railway guns were to be put on little-used country lines where they could fire on beaches, road junctions and harbours. The locations and cooperation given by the independent railway companies is explained, as are the difficulties of using the same lines for war and civilian traffic.

The First World War also saw the emergence of large training camps for railway men. When the war ended most railway guns were dismantled and lost in ordnance depots. The Army Council was uncertain about artillery needs in a future war, so training, and development stopped.

This book largely concentrates on the realities of the time, the type of gun, the locomotives, artillery targets, locations, and what it was like when firing took place. It is fully illustrated with pictures, maps and plans covering different aspects of railway guns their locomotives and equipment.

Railway Guns
 
 
 



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dawn.pillans@btinternet.com
 

Hi, the Amazon uk site hasn't realised the publication date was not August 2016 as shown in the book details panel. There is no pre-order facility showing. But I ticked the box so they will email me if the book becomes available! 

Regards

Dawn 

Sent from my iPhone

On 1 Jan 2017, at 17:37, Lee Unterborn lunterborn@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

According to the response I got from Amazon This title will be released on June 2, 2017. It looks like publication has been delayed but you can pre order it on Amazon
Lee

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 1, 2017, at 7:01 AM, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

If you look at the link provided, the blurb will tell you that the book will be published on 17 February 2017.
 
And buying from publisher pre that date will give a saving of four pounds.  Also the company, Pen & Sword is British owned, produces its product in the UK, and buying direct helps keep Britons in employment.
 
Amazon and with other such online book suppliers are now all American owned, they all take the publisher to the barest margin.
 
While such as ABE, with their excessive credit card cards are starting to send the small book dealers to the wall.  In their fight back a lot are now refusing credit cards so ABE (and others) do not get the book sellers to pay such, and you pay by direct bank charge (not Paypal which is also a rip off for the dealer, and as the Australian Federal Police inform us, is insecure!)
Yours,
MACKINLAY  New South Wales
 
Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2017 11:04 PM
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] New book from Pen & Sword in UK on rail guns
 


Alas, it's unavailable on Amazon despite the August 2016 publication date! Not sure if that means it was so popular that it sold out, or that they didn't expect much interest and printed few copies!

Happy New Year to all!

Dawn 
 
Sent from my iPhone

On 1 Jan 2017, at 11:20, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 
 

Railway Guns (Hardback)

British and German Guns at War

 

In the nineteenth century the War Office showed little interest in developing large heavy artillery for its land forces, preferring instead to equip its warships with the biggest guns. Private initiatives to mount a gun on a railway truck pulled by a steam engine were demonstrated before military chiefs in the Southern Counties, but not taken up. However, the development of longer-range guns, weighing up to 250 tons, to smash through the massive armies and trench systems on the Western Front in 1916, led to a rethink. The only way to move these monsters about quickly in countryside thick with mud was to mount them on specially built railway trucks towed by locomotives.

The railway guns were to be put on little-used country lines where they could fire on beaches, road junctions and harbours. The locations and cooperation given by the independent railway companies is explained, as are the difficulties of using the same lines for war and civilian traffic.

The First World War also saw the emergence of large training camps for railway men. When the war ended most railway guns were dismantled and lost in ordnance depots. The Army Council was uncertain about artillery needs in a future war, so training, and development stopped.

This book largely concentrates on the realities of the time, the type of gun, the locomotives, artillery targets, locations, and what it was like when firing took place. It is fully illustrated with pictures, maps and plans covering different aspects of railway guns their locomotives and equipment.

Railway Guns
 
 
 



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Nigel Attwood
 

Pen and Sword state 28 February as the release date.

 

Nigel

 

From: railwaygun@... [mailto:railwaygun@...]
Sent: 01 January 2017 19:46
To: railwaygun@...
Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] New book from Pen & Sword in UK on rail guns

 

 

Hi, the Amazon uk site hasn't realised the publication date was not August 2016 as shown in the book details panel. There is no pre-order facility showing. But I ticked the box so they will email me if the book becomes available! 

 

Regards


Dawn 

 

Sent from my iPhone


On 1 Jan 2017, at 17:37, Lee Unterborn lunterborn@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

According to the response I got from Amazon This title will be released on June 2, 2017. It looks like publication has been delayed but you can pre order it on Amazon

Lee

Sent from my iPhone


On Jan 1, 2017, at 7:01 AM, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

If you look at the link provided, the blurb will tell you that the book will be published on 17 February 2017.

 

And buying from publisher pre that date will give a saving of four pounds.  Also the company, Pen & Sword is British owned, produces its product in the UK, and buying direct helps keep Britons in employment.

 

Amazon and with other such online book suppliers are now all American owned, they all take the publisher to the barest margin.

 

While such as ABE, with their excessive credit card cards are starting to send the small book dealers to the wall.  In their fight back a lot are now refusing credit cards so ABE (and others) do not get the book sellers to pay such, and you pay by direct bank charge (not Paypal which is also a rip off for the dealer, and as the Australian Federal Police inform us, is insecure!)

Yours,

MACKINLAY  New South Wales

 

Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2017 11:04 PM

Subject: Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] New book from Pen & Sword in UK on rail guns

 




Alas, it's unavailable on Amazon despite the August 2016 publication date! Not sure if that means it was so popular that it sold out, or that they didn't expect much interest and printed few copies!


Happy New Year to all!


Dawn 

 

Sent from my iPhone


On 1 Jan 2017, at 11:20, 'Gordon Angus Mackinlay' gam47@... [railwaygun] <railwaygun@...> wrote:

 

 

Railway Guns (Hardback)

British and German Guns at War

 

In the nineteenth century the War Office showed little interest in developing large heavy artillery for its land forces, preferring instead to equip its warships with the biggest guns. Private initiatives to mount a gun on a railway truck pulled by a steam engine were demonstrated before military chiefs in the Southern Counties, but not taken up. However, the development of longer-range guns, weighing up to 250 tons, to smash through the massive armies and trench systems on the Western Front in 1916, led to a rethink. The only way to move these monsters about quickly in countryside thick with mud was to mount them on specially built railway trucks towed by locomotives.

The railway guns were to be put on little-used country lines where they could fire on beaches, road junctions and harbours. The locations and cooperation given by the independent railway companies is explained, as are the difficulties of using the same lines for war and civilian traffic.

The First World War also saw the emergence of large training camps for railway men. When the war ended most railway guns were dismantled and lost in ordnance depots. The Army Council was uncertain about artillery needs in a future war, so training, and development stopped.

This book largely concentrates on the realities of the time, the type of gun, the locomotives, artillery targets, locations, and what it was like when firing took place. It is fully illustrated with pictures, maps and plans covering different aspects of railway guns their locomotives and equipment.


Railway Guns

 

 

 

 


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