Date   
video clips of railguns of ww2

daniel jackson <djaxon@...>
 

http://www.panzerlexikon.de/access/access1.php<http://www.panzerlexikon.de/access/access1.php>

(down below the tanks are the railguns)

Hello,
This site has video clips of the railguns, but the clips are not working for me.
AND they are the new mpeg 4 format.

Could someone see if they could make these links work, and mention which "VIEWER" works for MPEG 4 for viewing?

Thanks,

Dan Jackson

Ebay and web sites oct 29

daniel jackson <djaxon@...>
 

Hello, some web sites and ebay items.
Dan

USA 2001 giant 1,500 traincar move of us equipment to Desert of california.
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0LEG/is_2001_July-August/ai_82477548<http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0LEG/is_2001_July-August/ai_82477548>

USA civil war 8 page article on the first Hospital traincars
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2004/is_3_48/ai_92589646/pg_1<http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2004/is_3_48/ai_92589646/pg_1>

USA strange giant gun barrel on NY 900 special traincar
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2279887851<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2279887851>

USA strange big cannon barrel on old truck
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=10963&item=2278702235&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=10963&item=2278702235&rd=1>

NICE big picture of 1899 Boer war armoured train cars
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=10164&item=3757483663&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=10164&item=3757483663&rd=1>

ww1 British railgun vs. Antwerp
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=280&item=2497287907&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=280&item=2497287907&rd=1>

WW1 French railguns, pair of pictures
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=921&item=2279180545&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=921&item=2279180545&rd=1>

WW1 or 2 French 340mm shell into breech closeup
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=13964&item=2279318934&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=13964&item=2279318934&rd=1>

1918 strange military traincar unknown use
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=418&item=2279301045&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=418&item=2279301045&rd=1>

ww2 Coastal artillery fort at Calais
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2277516517<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2277516517>

ww2 Coastal artillery fort at Calais
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2277516519<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2277516519>

USA 1950s Trains magazine on Ft Eustis Army steam engine school
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2280464119&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2280464119&ssPageName=ADME:B:SS:US:1>

USA 1910 Canal Zone area train engines in yard
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=20254&item=2280216740&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=20254&item=2280216740&rd=1>

USA 2002 cargo (900) units moved for army
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0LEG/is_2002_Sept-Oct/ai_93348638<http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0LEG/is_2002_Sept-Oct/ai_93348638>

Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Online Dealer for Single Current Issues...

Chuck Walters
 

Thanks Lee,
That is very helpful.
Chuck Walters


--- Lee <lunterborn@...> wrote:


Here is the website of a dealer that specializes in
selling Single
Current Issues of Magazines, not backissues. This
can be
helpful if you need to get your hands on a real
current issue,
don't subscribe, no one in town carries it and its
too new to be a
backissue yet.

http://www.magsnmore.com/

I notice that they do handle MILITARY MODELING,
among
others...

Lee






__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Yahoo! Mail Address AutoComplete - You start. We finish.
http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail

can some one tell me how many of these k5e...

joeri <joeri.michiels@...>
 

hello,

can some one tell me how many of these k5e guns had a double rail on top of the generator for transporting ammo. (like the k5e gun in cap gris nez ( Batterie Todt).

I can't find any pictures of it, in use during WW2 .

Was the generator during transport, put on a other railcar?

modelling ,greetings.

Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] sample images to the wrong adress

Chuck Walters
 

Marcel,
I would also be very interested.
Chuck Walters


--- "Raimondo L.Torelli" <thealamo@...> wrote:

At 22.18 23/10/2004 +0200, MARCEL wrote:
Sorry guys,

some sample images intended for Christian went to
the wrong adress.
In case any of you likes to get the 12inch factory
photo's, just let me
know by mail
and I will send them .
Sorry for the inconvenience.

regards,
Marcel
Oct 27 2004

Marcel
YES! I would love to see them: please, can you
send them as jpg?

Thanks a lot!
Raimondo
Don't Make Love, Make War. YES! HO Scale!



__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] sample images to the wrong adress

Raimondo L.Torelli <thealamo@...>
 

At 22.18 23/10/2004 +0200, MARCEL wrote:
Sorry guys,

some sample images intended for Christian went to the wrong adress.
In case any of you likes to get the 12inch factory photo's, just let me
know by mail
and I will send them .
Sorry for the inconvenience.

regards,
Marcel
Oct 27 2004

Marcel
YES! I would love to see them: please, can you send them as jpg?

Thanks a lot!
Raimondo
Don't Make Love, Make War. YES! HO Scale!

ebay items 0ct25 and a painting question.

daniel jackson <djaxon@...>
 

Hello,
Here are some ebay items to check out.
Dan


Question: how was the camo paint put on this railgun? Was it brushed carefully or was a template of some kind used to mask the area for painting?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=64822&item=2277374600&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=64822&item=2277374600&rd=1>

Longmoor Military Railway by the RCTS, April 1966. 16 pages (oct 31)
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=69192&item=2279129955&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=69192&item=2279129955&rd=1>

ww1 French railgun closeup of side gears
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6125745199<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6125745199>

1914 SUPER color print of trooper for the Royal Engineer Railway Battalion.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=42383&item=2278024169&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=42383&item=2278024169&rd=1>

railgun, large, but very small picture
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6125537295&fromMakeTrack=true<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=6125537295&fromMakeTrack=true>

1939 one very destroyed (army?) train
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=15504&item=6126472028&rd=1#ebayphotohosting<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=15504&item=6126472028&rd=1#ebayphotohosting>

ww2 German railgun, maybe.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=4078&item=2278469244&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=4078&item=2278469244&rd=1>




9.2 In. Coast Defence Gun
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=915&item=2278005439&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=915&item=2278005439&rd=1>

1927 Belgium large, "the Leugenboom gun" breech detail pictured
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=67679&item=2278387988&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=67679&item=2278387988&rd=1>

ww1 gum card of German Bombardment gun
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=37896&item=6125820478&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=37896&item=6125820478&rd=1>

usa ww1 artillery ammo park book 1919 what a truck on the cover (oct25)
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=13976&item=2278430044&rd=1<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=13976&item=2278430044&rd=1>

[railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Re: Voegel turntable

tompeters30907
 

They would usually try and survey for the best possible location to
fire from to hit a specific target, its essentially using methods of
fire and fire control well established for railguns in WWI.
My question is though, exactly how much firing did the railguns
actually do in this battle. I have to wonder if there wasn't simply
an assumption being made after the fact, that because the railguns
were captured around that area that they were actually being used in
that area, that assumption might not be correct.
The 36th infantry accounts state they took railroad gun fire on the
23rd August. Not exactly iron bound, but a possibility.

thanks,

Tom

[railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Re: Voegel turntable

lru29
 

They would usually try and survey for the best possible location to
fire from to hit a specific target, its essentially using methods of
fire and fire control well established for railguns in WWI.
My question is though, exactly how much firing did the railguns
actually do in this battle. I have to wonder if there wasn't simply
an assumption being made after the fact, that because the railguns
were captured around that area that they were actually being used in
that area, that assumption might not be correct.

--- In railwaygun@..., Tom and Lisa P <gionpeters@c...>
wrote:
Time in and out of action for a Voegel turntable was really an
irrelevant factor since they were largely used only in long term
static firing positions such as the Atlantic Wall and the siege of
Leningrad, where there wasn't much urgency to get them setup
really
quickly. In historical context, the Germans had used far, far more
complex and labor and material intensive firing platforms for
railguns and other heavy guns in the First World War, compared to
them the Voegel was labor cheap and easy to handle, which is why
the
Germans were fond of it in WWII.
Its beginning to sound like that perhapts in Montelimar, no
turntables were used, in which case, the Germans had to use curves
in
the track to target a location ? At best, wouldnt that be a
essentially random chance to be able to hit a target location or
not ?

thanks,

Tom

Re: Voegel turntable

lru29
 

There is some conflict of sources then, because other sources state
that the Kelley Mount,as the Mount 155mm Firing Platform, T6E1, and
later adopted as 155mm Gun Platform, M1, as it was popularly called,
did reach both Army units and Marine Defense Battalions in the
Pacific by late in the war(although photos of Marine 155mm guns I
have seen don't show it in use). The unit cost for it in WWII was
supposedly $4,964.00.

For members who aren't familar with the mount, there is a nice photo
of a 155mm M1 on one at:

http://www.strategyplanet.com/panzergeneral/ww2/Weapons/towed_artille
ry/usa/pictures/155mm_Gun_M1/155mm_gun_m2_on_m1_fpm1_001.jpg




--- In railwaygun@..., "Gordon Angus Mackinlay"
<gam47@b...> wrote:
Lee wrote : "The moble Panama mount never did see much use, its
use was
mostly in
the Pacific by units such as the Marine Defense Battalions. And
compared to the heavy cumbersome naval 7", 5" and 3" mounts that
they had had to deal with at the beginning of the war, the mobile
mount was rather easy to deal with in the long run."

If you read :
UPDEGRAPH Charles L. Junior. US Marine Corps Special Units of
World War II.
Marine Corps Historical Reference Pamphlet, Historical Division,
HQ USMC,
Washington DC, 1972. SC, photos, 105p. (reprinted on a number of
occassions).

The section on Marine Defense Battalions states that they never
used the US
CAC Mobile Panama Mount as it was far too heavy and complex, and
improvisation of coast defence mounts were made.

As I stated in my initial message, the Panama mount was in two
variants for
the M1917 and the M1 155mm guns. In the early 1950's, proponents
of the
then defunct CAC won approval for the National Guard on the West
Coast to
have M1 155mm battalions assigned to coast defence. Since the
guns would
not fit onto the M1917 mounts, well over 900 new mounts were built
(each two
gun battery having a average cost of $450K at 1950 prices). In
1954
commonsense pervailed and the scheme was shelved, with the NG
battalions
assigned to the Field Army. A old friend of mine, after
graduation from
West Point and assignment to the Corps of Engineers in 1959, was
assigned
the task of maintaining these 450 odd battery positions and their
infrastucture, even though they had absolutely no role in time of
war!!!
The cost of maintaining them was more than it cost to maintain a
armoured
brigade in Germany!

Yours,
G/.

Voegel turntable

Gordon Angus Mackinlay
 

Lee wrote : "The moble Panama mount never did see much use, its use was
mostly in
the Pacific by units such as the Marine Defense Battalions. And
compared to the heavy cumbersome naval 7", 5" and 3" mounts that
they had had to deal with at the beginning of the war, the mobile
mount was rather easy to deal with in the long run."

If you read :
UPDEGRAPH Charles L. Junior. US Marine Corps Special Units of World War II.
Marine Corps Historical Reference Pamphlet, Historical Division, HQ USMC,
Washington DC, 1972. SC, photos, 105p. (reprinted on a number of
occassions).

The section on Marine Defense Battalions states that they never used the US
CAC Mobile Panama Mount as it was far too heavy and complex, and
improvisation of coast defence mounts were made.

As I stated in my initial message, the Panama mount was in two variants for
the M1917 and the M1 155mm guns. In the early 1950's, proponents of the
then defunct CAC won approval for the National Guard on the West Coast to
have M1 155mm battalions assigned to coast defence. Since the guns would
not fit onto the M1917 mounts, well over 900 new mounts were built (each two
gun battery having a average cost of $450K at 1950 prices). In 1954
commonsense pervailed and the scheme was shelved, with the NG battalions
assigned to the Field Army. A old friend of mine, after graduation from
West Point and assignment to the Corps of Engineers in 1959, was assigned
the task of maintaining these 450 odd battery positions and their
infrastucture, even though they had absolutely no role in time of war!!!
The cost of maintaining them was more than it cost to maintain a armoured
brigade in Germany!

Yours,
G/.

[railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Re: Voegel turntable

tompeters30907
 

Time in and out of action for a Voegel turntable was really an
irrelevant factor since they were largely used only in long term
static firing positions such as the Atlantic Wall and the siege of
Leningrad, where there wasn't much urgency to get them setup really
quickly. In historical context, the Germans had used far, far more
complex and labor and material intensive firing platforms for
railguns and other heavy guns in the First World War, compared to
them the Voegel was labor cheap and easy to handle, which is why the
Germans were fond of it in WWII.
Its beginning to sound like that perhapts in Montelimar, no
turntables were used, in which case, the Germans had to use curves in
the track to target a location ? At best, wouldnt that be a
essentially random chance to be able to hit a target location or not ?

thanks,

Tom

Re: [railwayguns, armoured trains and Military Railways] Voegel turntable

tompeters30907
 

The gentleman wrote : "Does anyone know how long it typically took to set up
a Voegel
turntable use for German Railroad guns ?"

Its rather like asking how long is a piece of string!, as I wrote in a
previous posting, the Voegel turntable was a complex piece of ineffective
equipment. Many variables must be taken into consideration.

Firstly, this was not a piece of equipment designed for mobile warfare, it
was designed for use in fairly static locations, from which it was not
required to be move on a regular basis.

As with any engineering task, its only as good as its workforce. The German
Pioneer troops did not have specialised units for this task, so any form of
engineering unit would be allocated the task. So its installation would be
a case of trial and error.

Whilst I have seen a training film showing its installation, I have never
actually read a handbook of instruction.

Making an educated guess I would say it would need a pioneer troops platoon
(ie field engineers) tasked, some 45 men to level the ground, place ballast
down, install drainage, lay the turntable, and run a branch line onto the
table. Since they would have to be using hand tools and simple lifting
devices, and allowing that all component pieces fitted together in the
correct manner (ie. had not been damaged in previous use), ground structure
was perfect, and Mr Murphy did not turn up! Twenty to thirty hours would
be a reasonable estimate, of course then the gun and carriage would have to
be run across each setting of the table to bed in the table components. So
add another five to ten hours on. In total, between twenty five and forty
hours, in a European summer with long periods of daylight, three to four
days.

This is in the case of a weapon capable of 360degree fire, if you just
wanted to put the turntable down for a training illustration ie. not to be
fired, and the gun just static, ten hours (plus) approximate would be
realistic. Also you must remember that these turntables were not mass
produced, but, individually manufactured items (unlike say the components of
the Bailey Bridge).

Yours,
G/.
G/., thanks for the info. I realize there is a lot of latitude in set up time, but I am trying to get to a best guess.

I have been researching the battle of Montelimar (France 1944), and there are accounts of the RR guns being fired, so I am assuming they used the turntable.

thanks,

Tom

Re: Voegel turntable

lru29
 

Time in and out of action for a Voegel turntable was really an
irrelevant factor since they were largely used only in long term
static firing positions such as the Atlantic Wall and the siege of
Leningrad, where there wasn't much urgency to get them setup really
quickly. In historical context, the Germans had used far, far more
complex and labor and material intensive firing platforms for
railguns and other heavy guns in the First World War, compared to
them the Voegel was labor cheap and easy to handle, which is why the
Germans were fond of it in WWII.
As for the Panama Mounts, the majority of the ones used were the
concrete type, which were already built and in position, you simply
wheeled the 155mm GPF or later 155mm M1 up onto the firing platform.
The moble Panama mount never did see much use, its use was mostly in
the Pacific by units such as the Marine Defense Battalions. And
compared to the heavy cumbersome naval 7", 5" and 3" mounts that
they had had to deal with at the beginning of the war, the mobile
mount was rather easy to deal with in the long run.

--- In railwaygun@..., "Gordon Angus Mackinlay"
<gam47@b...> wrote:
The gentleman wrote : "Does anyone know how long it typically took
to set up
a Voegel
turntable use for German Railroad guns ?"

Its rather like asking how long is a piece of string!, as I wrote
in a
previous posting, the Voegel turntable was a complex piece of
ineffective
equipment. Many variables must be taken into consideration.

Firstly, this was not a piece of equipment designed for mobile
warfare, it
was designed for use in fairly static locations, from which it was
not
required to be move on a regular basis.

As with any engineering task, its only as good as its workforce.
The German
Pioneer troops did not have specialised units for this task, so
any form of
engineering unit would be allocated the task. So its installation
would be
a case of trial and error.

Whilst I have seen a training film showing its installation, I
have never
actually read a handbook of instruction.

Making an educated guess I would say it would need a pioneer
troops platoon
(ie field engineers) tasked, some 45 men to level the ground,
place ballast
down, install drainage, lay the turntable, and run a branch line
onto the
table. Since they would have to be using hand tools and simple
lifting
devices, and allowing that all component pieces fitted together in
the
correct manner (ie. had not been damaged in previous use), ground
structure
was perfect, and Mr Murphy did not turn up! Twenty to thirty
hours would
be a reasonable estimate, of course then the gun and carriage
would have to
be run across each setting of the table to bed in the table
components. So
add another five to ten hours on. In total, between twenty five
and forty
hours, in a European summer with long periods of daylight, three
to four
days.

This is in the case of a weapon capable of 360degree fire, if you
just
wanted to put the turntable down for a training illustration ie.
not to be
fired, and the gun just static, ten hours (plus) approximate would
be
realistic. Also you must remember that these turntables were not
mass
produced, but, individually manufactured items (unlike say the
components of
the Bailey Bridge).

You could equate it with the US Army Coast Defence Corps Panama
mount for
the 155mm gun (two variants, for the M1917 and the M1) - these in
the main
were static gun positions and the gun came to the position, There
was
however, a mobile Panama mount, this massive and complex
(basically a piece
of junk) steel device would according to the handbook take some
forty hours
to assemble (and if the gun had been fired from it, a unknown
amount of time
to disassemble).

When supplied to the Royal Australian Artillery in WWII, the M1917
155mm gun
(which was a very efficient weapon) was issued to semi-mobile
coast defence
batteries (of two guns each), they needing mobile Panama mounts.
Whilst a
couple of such arrived in 1942, the RAA coast defence personnel
put their
think caps on and came up with a much more effective mount (using
less
steel, and cheaper to manufacture in bulk). This was a very
impressive
device, so much so that when examined by US CAC officers (and
those from the
USMC Defense Battalions), they requested the same from the US. To
no avail,
I am always totally bewildered by the US CAC. It took the best
graduating
officers from West Point, all with engineering degrees (and science
degrees), but, was on the outbreak of WWII a truly inefficient arm
of
service. The various volumes of The US Army in World War II (the
Green
Books) are extremely critical of the corps in all aspects!

The Australian use of the 155mm and their Panama mount is
described in KIDD
Reg, NEAL Ray. The 'Letter' Batteries the history of the 'letter'
batteries
in world war II. Self published, Sydney, 1998. HB, xiv, 415p.,
photos, maps,
drawings, index.
A fascinating military and technical history.

Yours,
G/.

Voegel turntable

Gordon Angus Mackinlay
 

The gentleman wrote : "Does anyone know how long it typically took to set up
a Voegel
turntable use for German Railroad guns ?"

Its rather like asking how long is a piece of string!, as I wrote in a
previous posting, the Voegel turntable was a complex piece of ineffective
equipment. Many variables must be taken into consideration.

Firstly, this was not a piece of equipment designed for mobile warfare, it
was designed for use in fairly static locations, from which it was not
required to be move on a regular basis.

As with any engineering task, its only as good as its workforce. The German
Pioneer troops did not have specialised units for this task, so any form of
engineering unit would be allocated the task. So its installation would be
a case of trial and error.

Whilst I have seen a training film showing its installation, I have never
actually read a handbook of instruction.

Making an educated guess I would say it would need a pioneer troops platoon
(ie field engineers) tasked, some 45 men to level the ground, place ballast
down, install drainage, lay the turntable, and run a branch line onto the
table. Since they would have to be using hand tools and simple lifting
devices, and allowing that all component pieces fitted together in the
correct manner (ie. had not been damaged in previous use), ground structure
was perfect, and Mr Murphy did not turn up! Twenty to thirty hours would
be a reasonable estimate, of course then the gun and carriage would have to
be run across each setting of the table to bed in the table components. So
add another five to ten hours on. In total, between twenty five and forty
hours, in a European summer with long periods of daylight, three to four
days.

This is in the case of a weapon capable of 360degree fire, if you just
wanted to put the turntable down for a training illustration ie. not to be
fired, and the gun just static, ten hours (plus) approximate would be
realistic. Also you must remember that these turntables were not mass
produced, but, individually manufactured items (unlike say the components of
the Bailey Bridge).

You could equate it with the US Army Coast Defence Corps Panama mount for
the 155mm gun (two variants, for the M1917 and the M1) - these in the main
were static gun positions and the gun came to the position, There was
however, a mobile Panama mount, this massive and complex (basically a piece
of junk) steel device would according to the handbook take some forty hours
to assemble (and if the gun had been fired from it, a unknown amount of time
to disassemble).

When supplied to the Royal Australian Artillery in WWII, the M1917 155mm gun
(which was a very efficient weapon) was issued to semi-mobile coast defence
batteries (of two guns each), they needing mobile Panama mounts. Whilst a
couple of such arrived in 1942, the RAA coast defence personnel put their
think caps on and came up with a much more effective mount (using less
steel, and cheaper to manufacture in bulk). This was a very impressive
device, so much so that when examined by US CAC officers (and those from the
USMC Defense Battalions), they requested the same from the US. To no avail,
I am always totally bewildered by the US CAC. It took the best graduating
officers from West Point, all with engineering degrees (and science
degrees), but, was on the outbreak of WWII a truly inefficient arm of
service. The various volumes of The US Army in World War II (the Green
Books) are extremely critical of the corps in all aspects!

The Australian use of the 155mm and their Panama mount is described in KIDD
Reg, NEAL Ray. The 'Letter' Batteries the history of the 'letter' batteries
in world war II. Self published, Sydney, 1998. HB, xiv, 415p., photos, maps,
drawings, index.
A fascinating military and technical history.

Yours,
G/.

Voegel turntable

tompeters30907
 

Does anyone know how long it typically took to set up a Voegel
turntable use for German Railroad guns ?

thanks,

Tom

sample images to the wrong adress

marcel
 

Sorry guys,

some sample images intended for Christian went to the wrong adress.
In case any of you likes to get the 12inch factory photo's, just let me know by mail
and I will send them .
Sorry for the inconvenience.

regards,
Marcel




sample of 38cm Siegfried manual pages

marcel
 

British 12inch original factory photo

marcel
 

One of the many british railgun photo's I have.
This one is of a series of 4, inside the factory.

Marcel

K5 Leopold drawing

marcel
 

As promised a sample of one of the other Krupp drawings.
They all are more detailed than the Dora ones.
This sample shows only a detail from the K5 drawing. In the top you see
some of the
numbers corresponding with other technical drawings.

More to follow.

regards,

Marcel